Pace University to Host Colorful LEGO League Tournament

Twenty-five teams of children, ages 9-14, from New York State and New Hampshire schools, Girl Scout troops and neighborhoods will demonstrate competing ways of building and programming a robot using LEGO sets that address how the health, biodiversity, and productivity of the world’s oceans can be sustained for present and future generations.

Contacts:

Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

or Bernice Houle, Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, Pace University, 914-773-3592, bhoule@pace.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY

February 6, 2006

PACE UNIVERSITY TO HOST 25 TEAMS FROM LOCAL SCHOOLS

IN COLORFUL LEGO LEAGUE TOURNAMENT

This year’s challenge – “Ocean Odyssey”

WHAT: Twenty-five teams of children, ages 9-14, from New York State and New Hampshire schools, Girl Scout troops and neighborhoods will demonstrate competing ways of building and programming a robot using LEGO sets that address how the health, biodiversity, and productivity of the world’s oceans can be sustained for present and future generations.

WHEN: Sunday, February 12, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Opening ceremonies at 12:15 p.m.

WHERE: Pace University, Pleasantville Campus, Goldstein Fitness Center

Media admission by press pass. This event is free and open to the public.

For more information or to volunteer, contact Bernice J. Houle, (914) 773-3592, bhoule@pace.edu .

WHO: Twenty-four teams from NY and one team from NH will compete in the FIRST LEGO League. Eleven teams from NY will compete in the Jr. FIRST LEGO League. At least one all-girl team will compete, including a team formed by the Girl Scout Council of Westchester/Putnam.

The tournament is run entirely by volunteers, including Pace students, staff and faculty. Pace students will serve as referees. Judges are from major corporations in the area, including IBM, T.J. Watson Research Center, Apple Computing, and Evionyx.

The FIRST Organization, founded by inventor Dean Kamen, creator of the Segway Human Transporter, has teamed up with the LEGO Company to create FIRST LEGO League. Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems will host the Lower Hudson FIRST LEGO League Tournament, an annual event that over the last three years has encouraged children to use their imagination, work with LEGO sets, and learn about science and technology in a fun and exciting way. Each year, the tournament has a different internationally announced challenge. This year’s is “Ocean Odyssey.”

Teams will present robotics technology solutions they have researched to perform missions like deploying a submarine, servicing a pipeline, releasing a dolphin, and cleaning up a cargo shipping accident. In addition to the tournament missions, the teams will be judged on robot design and programming, a 10-minute research presentation, and demonstrated teamwork.

This year, the Lower Hudson Tournament is also sponsoring Jr. FIRST LEGO League for 6-9 year olds. Eleven teams from New York State have each been building a model depicting newly-discovered marine life (plant or animal), and a motorized submarine, water vehicle or scuba diver to explore their models and those of others. At the tournament, the teams will connect their base plate to other plates to create a huge underwater scene.

Web sites:

FIRST Organization http://www.usfirst.org/jrobtcs/flego.htm

CSIS at Pace http://csis.pace.edu

Pioneer Pace Law Environmental Program to mark 30th anniversary with John P. Cahill speech, panels

Pace Law School helped create the field of environmental law 30 years ago when environmental subjects were not regularly taught in law schools and most law firms did not have environmental law practices.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Contact:
Jennifer Riekert, Pace Law School (914) 422-4128, jriekert@law.pace.edu
Tom Schuyler, M Booth & Associates (212) 593-3223, toms@mbooth.com

PIONEER PACE LAW SCHOOL ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAM
TO MARK 30TH ANNIVERSARY

Distinguished alumnus John P. Cahill to assess accomplishments and future of environmental law

Pace program was one of first in nation, helped shape the field

WHITE PLAINS, NY, September 25, 2007 – Pace Law School helped create the field of environmental law 30 years ago when environmental subjects were not regularly taught in law schools and most law firms did not have environmental law practices.

Now, when both are now mainstream, the school is celebrating its environmental program’s 30th anniversary with two days of reflections on the history and prospects of the field its professors and graduates have shaped. The school is regularly ranked among the top three law schools in the U.S. in environmental law.

Calls to future action also will be part of the anniversary program, which is being keynoted by one of the school’s stellar graduates, John P. Cahill (JD ‘85), former chief of staff and secretary to New York Governor George Pataki.

The event is open to the media with pre-reservation, to alumni, and to interested lawyers and policymakers. It takes place at Pace’s White Plains, N.Y., campus Friday and Saturday, October 19 and 20.

“Graduates of the environmental law program have made outstanding contributions to promoting and protecting the environmental standards,” wrote Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton in a congratulatory letter.

Pioneer in the wilderness of saving the wilderness (and other ecosystems)

Pace Law School’s Environmental Law Program was among the first in the nation when it was founded in 1978 by Nicholas A. Robinson, then a recent graduate of Columbia Law School, now an internationally-recognized leader in the field.

Currently, the program’s most prominent environmental alumnus is Robert F. Kennedy Jr. (SJD ‘87), who is a professor and co-director of the school’s Environmental Litigation Clinic. Early graduates, Robinson says, include “Christopher Blanc, who went on to establish the first environmental crimes unit in the Brooklyn District Attorney’s Office, and Marla Rubin, who became the leading scholarly commentator in New York State on professional responsibility in the practice of environmental law.”

Pace’s environmental law alumni, including those presenting at the anniversary, have been educated by some of the nation’s most outstanding environmental lawyers including Robinson; Richard L. Ottinger, dean emeritus of the Law School and a former member of the U.S. House of Representatives; Ann Powers, former vice president and general counsel of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Jeffrey G. Miller, former head of the EPA’s enforcement program; and Karl Coplan, co-Director of the Pace school’s Environmental Litigation Clinic.

Pace was the only environmental law program to start with an international specialization. It was the first U.S. law school admitted to membership in the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN), the oldest and largest international organization of governments, scientists and professionals working on conservation.

Summit conference, Law review, national moot court competition

Last year, the program was host to hundreds of the world’s best-known environmentalists who gathered at Pace Law School for one of the year’s largest and most important environmental summits, held under the auspices of the IUCN’s Academy of Environmental Law. With approximately 1,000 alumni, the environmental law program now attracts nearly one-third of each year’s entering class and sponsors a program of training and exchanges focused on environmental issues in Brazil, international internships, the Pace Environmental Law Review, the National Environmental Moot Court Competition, the Pace Energy Project that researches the environmental costs of electricity and promotes alternative energy sources, and the Environmental Litigation Clinic, which has helped win a number of landmark suits to protect the Hudson River and other natural resources. Reaching out across oceans and war zones, the widely-emulated program has offered distance learning opportunities for students in places from Gaza to Singapore.

“The multifaceted and successful careers of Pace Las alumni in many environmental fields are a true reflection of Pace’s long-term vision, dynamic leadership and committed faculty and staff,” wrote New York Governor Eliot Spitzer in a letter congratulating the Las School on the anniversary.

Schedule Highlights
Anniversary panels and discussions will provide fresh legal views of issues that have been shaping recent international stories, from deadly pollution unleashed by rapid industrial development in emerging nations to punishing storms and floods.

Friday, October 19: John P. Cahill delivers Kerlin Distinguished Lecture in Environmental Law

The anniversary celebration will launch Friday evening, October 19, at 5PM when Cahill reflects on his experiences in Albany and outlines future environmental law issues that need attention in New York State and the nation. His talk, the annual Gilbert and Sarah Kerlin Distinguished Lecture in Environmental Law, is titled “Environmental Law in New York State: The Past as Prologue to the Future.”

Saturday, October 20

Sessions starting in early afternoon presented by Pace Law alumni will cover emerging topics including ethics, climate change, ethics, local land use issues, corporate responsibility, suits brought by citizens, and insurance.

The Legal Implications of Climate Change: The Future of Renewable Energy in the U.S.

Plenary session at 1:00 PM: “The Legal Implications of Climate Change: The Future of Renewable Energy in the United States.” Participating are Christopher Rizzo, an associate at Carter, Ledyard & Milburn LLC; Victor M. Tafur, Staff Attorney at Hudson Riverkeeper; Karl Rabago of AES Corporation; and Patricia Mastrianni, an attorney in the Division of Environmental Enforcement at the New York Department of Environmental Conservation. The session will explore how legal practices are changing to accommodate climate disruptions from greenhouse gasses to unavoidable natural events, and how these disruptions are changing areas like how insurance rates are set, how real estate development is designed, and how environmental impact statements are written. Mastrianni is in charge of rewriting the New York State rules for environmental impact statements, all of which will henceforth have to evaluate issues of climate change.

Other notable Saturday sessions, again featuring pace Law’s environmental alumni are:

• “The Future of Citizen Litigation in the Environmental Field,” focusing on cutting-edge issues in citizen suits brought under federal environmental statutes. The session will be conducted by Daniel E. Estrin, a supervising attorney in the Pace Environmental Law Clinic; Jeffrey Odefey, a counsel to the Waterkeeper Alliance; and Janice Dean, an Assistant Attorney General in the Environmental Protection Bureau of the New York State Attorney General’s Office.

• “Global Aspects of Environmental Law Practice,” examining a spectrum of issues and led by John Garrison of the United States Agency for International Development, Marco Olsen, provost of the University of Belize, and Marc Yaggi, an attorney with the Waterkeeper Alliance.

• “Biofuels and the Promise of Sustainability: The Brazil Experience,” exploring major legal, environmental and policy issues facing the United States as it seeks to enhance energy security and increase its use of biofuels (as Brazil has). Participants include Marla Weider, an attorney with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Romulo S.R. Sampaio, a Brazilian lawyer pursuing his S.J.D in Environmental Law at Pace Law School, and C. Nicole Simmons, of the Law Office of Howard Davis.

Founded in 1976, Pace University School of Law has nearly 6,500 alumnae throughout the country and the world. It offers full- and part-time day and evening JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus. The School also offers the Master of Laws in Environmental Law and in Comparative Legal Studies and an SJD in environmental law. The School of Law is part of a comprehensive, independent, and diversified University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu.

Learn to Reap Environmental and Economic Benefits of “Brownfields”

How to reap the environmental and economic benefits of “brownfields” on the waterfronts of New York and New Jersey will be presented at an all-day conference at the downtown New York City campus of Pace University April 13.

The following news release was issued by an organization holding a conference at Pace’s downtown campus next week.
– Pace Public Information

For Immediate Release

Contact
Lori Karole Shook
(773) 714-0407 x13
lorikaroles@brownfieldnews.com

Waterfront & Brownfield Redevelopment in NY and NJ
to be Addressed at National Brownfield Association Conference at Pace University April 13

Chicago, March 29, 2005 – How to reap the environmental and economic benefits of “brownfields” on the waterfronts of New York and New Jersey will be presented at an all-day conference at the downtown New York City campus of Pace University April 13.

The Waterfront Redevelopment and Deal Flow Conference is being presented by the National Brownfield Association (NBA), a non-profit educational organization based in Chicago, which now has ten chapters in the US and Canada, including those in both New Jersey and New York. The organization promotes the responsible redevelopment of brownfields, which typically are abandoned or underutilized industrial or commercial properties where redevelopment is hampered due to the real or perceived presence of environmental hazards.

Putting these properties back into productive use provides both environmental and economic benefits — it creates jobs, restores local economies and cleans up impacted soils and groundwater.

The conference will focus on the redevelopment of brownfields that are located along the waterfront in New York and New Jersey. The redevelopment of this waterfront is an important issue for the growth and development of the region and brownfield properties can often be the only land available.

Providing keynote addresses are Kathy Callahan, Acting Region 2 Administrator, US EPA (invited) and Marcia Bystryn, Executive Director, New York League of Conservation Voters. Invited speakers include Mayor Michael Bloomberg, City of New York, and Mayor Philip Amicone, City of Yonkers. There will be updates from the NJ Department of Environmental Protection by Joe Seebode, Assistant Commissioner for Site Remediation and Waste Management and NYS Department of Environmental Conservation by Dale A. Desnoyers, Director of the Division of Environmental Remediation.

The day will conclude with an optional brownfield boat tour, networking reception and deal flow exhibition. The target audience is property owners, developers, investors, service professionals and government representatives. Press are welcome to attend – media admission is by press pass. For more information, visit the NBA website at www.brownfieldassociation.org or contact the NBA at (773) 714-0407 or nbaevent@brownfieldnews.com.

Leading Environmental Consortium in Hudson Valley Appoints First Director

The Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities today appointed its first director, Michelle Land, J.D., coordinator of the Pace Academy for the Environment (PAE).

Contact:
Rosemary Mercedes, Manager of Public Information
Pace University, 212-346-1637, Cell: 914-424-1637 rmercedes@pace.edu

The Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities today appointed its first director, Michelle Land, J.D., coordinator of the Pace Academy for the Environment (PAE).

Land will lead 34 higher education institutions in an ambitious interdisciplinary program aimed at training future environmental leaders and “shaping the future of the regional and global environment,” according to the Consortium’s adopted mission. This marks the first time the region’s colleges and universities have joined together on environmental issues.

“Only higher education can offer, in one place, the array of skills that environmental decision-making requires,” said Land. “The expertise the Consortium offers is comprehensive, from the social and natural sciences to art and economics, and everything in between. Harnessing those resources for students and the public good is a natural mission for colleges and universities.”

“Michelle Land’s deep knowledge of environmental issues and her leadership skills make her a natural for moving forward the coalition’s groundbreaking environmental and education efforts,” said John Cronin, director of the PAE and the nation’s first Riverkeeper.

Land earned a Juris Doctor and certificate in environmental law from Pace University School of Law in 2002, where she was Editor-in-Chief of the Pace Environmental Law Review. In 2000, while still a student, she was part of the team from Pace Law School’s Environmental Law Clinic that successfully argued the landmark Esopus Creek case before the U.S. Court of Appeals, Second Circuit (Catskill Mountains Chapter of Trout Unlimited et. al. vs. NYC DEP), which resulted in a $5.7 million penalty against the City of New York for discharging highly turbid water from the Shandanken tunnel without the required Clear Water Act permit. (The precedent setting case is on appeal for the penalty amount.)

For the last two years, Land has been program coordinator for PAE, one of the environmental programs that have made Pace University well known for environmental studies. (Its law school is one of the nation’s top three environmental law schools, as ranked by US News & World Report.) The PAE is dedicated to fostering policies, practices and ideas that sustain a mutually enhancing relationship between nature and society.

Land also is an adjunct assistant professor at Pace. She teaches environmental law, policy and the integration of nature and culture in both the M.S. in Environmental Science and undergraduate environmental studies programs.

As a wildlife biologist at the World Bird Sanctuary in Missouri, Land directed field research producing wildlife survey reports for corporate contracts. The focus of her work also included environmental education programs and rehabilitation, propagation and reintroduction of birds of prey.

She earned a Bachelor of Science degree, with honors, in Wildlife Biology from the University of Guelph, Ontario. Land also was a research associate at Pace’s Land Use Law Center, where she created a model local law for protecting wildlife and wildlife habitat. It was published as a chapter of a resource guide for local municipal officials.

Formed under the leadership of PAE, the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities promotes collaboration by its member campuses to increase the scope and impact of their environmental teaching and research. http://www.environmentalconsortium.org/

The Consortium’s current members are Bard College; Barnard College; Columbia University; CUNY – Queens College; Dominican College; Dutchess Community College; Fordham University; Iona College; Manhattan College; Manhattanville College; Marist College; Marymount College of Fordham University; Mount Saint Mary College; the College of Mount Saint Vincent; The College of New Rochelle; Pace University; Polytechnic University; Ramapo College of New Jersey; Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; The Sage Colleges; The College of Saint Rose; Saint Thomas Aquinas College; Sarah Lawrence College; Sienna College; the State University of New York campuses at New Paltz, Purchase, Stony Brook and Albany; the SUNY community colleges of Westchester, Columbia-Greene, Rockland, and Ulster County; Union College and Vassar College.

A private university in the New York Metropolitan area, Pace has a growing national reputation for offering students opportunity, teaching and learning based on research, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. Pace has seven campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. Approximately 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu

New Coalition to Announce Coordinated Agenda for Environmental Education and Public Service

College students will soon have the opportunity to take “classes” by kayak when an innovative “River Summer Semester” launches on the Hudson River.

Contact
Christopher T. Cory, Director of Public Information, Pace University
212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu
Michele Land, Pace Academy for the Environment
914-773-3738 or mland@pace.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY
Editors: Sessions are closed to the public, open to reporters/producers.

Consortium leaders will issue a statement at 2:00 PM Saturday, October 30.
The statement can be emailed in midafternoon that day to interested desks and reporters. Please let us know if you want it.
It also will be posted on the coalition’s website, www.EnvironmentalConsortium.org.

Trading classrooms for kayaks?
NEW COALITION OF 33 HUDSON VALLEY COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES
TO ANNOUNCE COORDINATED AGENDA
FOR ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC SERVICE

Collaborative event will be “most important environmental/academic conference
ever held in the region” and set national model

Pleasantville, NY, October 26, 2004 – College students will soon have the opportunity to take “classes” by kayak when an innovative “River Summer Semester” launches on the Hudson River.

A group of colleges and universities that are collaborating to incubate the project will refine the curriculum in a conference Friday and Saturday, October 29-30, in Poughkeepsie at Marist College.

The group is the new Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities. Formed in February, it now includes 33 of the valley’s 60 colleges and universities. Their representatives will be planning new ways to improve the environment through cooperative teaching, research and service.

Consortium members include institutions close to the Hudson’s headwaters like Rensselaer Polytechnic in Troy, those near where the river mixes with sea water like Columbia, eight units of the State University of New York, small private colleges like Vassar and religious schools like Fordham.

Undergraduate research. The meeting will be the “most important environmental/academic conference ever held in the region,” said John Cronin, who directs Pace University’s Academy for the Environment and was the nation’s first Riverkeeper. In the last two years the Pace Academy has lead the creation of the new coalition and continues to play the key organizational role, under the direction of Michelle Land, a graduate of Pace Law School.

Presentations and “posters” by participants will provide an overview of undergraduate environmental programs already in place throughout the Valley. National and statewide perspective will come from experts at Oklahoma State University, Williams College, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

Field stations and mentors. The “River Summer Semester” being crafted will be an interdisciplinary, intercampus combination of field work, class work, and work in communities. As students make their way down the Hudson from its headwaters in the Adirondacks to Manhattan, they will travel by foot, train and kayak, changing locations each week.

Other planned multi-campus courses and research projects will use the Hudson Valley as “an extended laboratory and classroom,” Cronin says. By joining resources, schools can accomplish more than any single institution. For example, the Consortium envisions a shared research vessel and field stations. Students will learn by sharing professors from other institutions than their own .

Pataki connection. Already Pace, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Columbia and the New York State Rivers and Estuaries Center on the Hudson are partners on “Riverscope,” a $1 million continuous, real-time monitoring system for the Hudson. A coalition website, www.environmentalconsortium.org , is helping professors and administrators exchange ideas.

Speakers at the consortium’s founding conference in February included Governor George E. Pataki, who announced the formation of an independent but related Higher Education Advisory Council on the Hudson headed by Pace President David A. Caputo. The group pledged cooperation with the new Rivers and Estuaries Center, for which Cronin wears a second hat as Managing Director.

Campuses are the ideal candidates. “Higher education must become more engaged in the environment,” Cronin insists.

“Colleges and universities are the only institutions with the dual purposes of being multi-disciplinary and serving society. They have the critical and intellectual capacity to marshal the knowledge and skills that environmental issues and environmental education require.”

The group hopes to set a model for other regions. “We believe the outcomes will have wide-ranging effects on environmental agendas for many college and universities,” Cronin says.

He adds: “The Hudson River Valley is an environmental bellwether. Environmental activities here predated Earth Day in 1970, and the Hudson has been the locus of pioneering case law and urban and rural environmental victories. Pace and other regional institutions are in the midst of an environmental culture of national and global significance.”

Membership. The current members of the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges & Universities are Bard College; Barnard College; Columbia University; CUNY – Queens College; Dominican College; Fordham University; Iona College; Manhattan College; Manhattanville College; Marist College; Marymount College of Fordham University; Mount Saint Mary College; the College of Mount Saint Vincent; The College of New Rochelle; Pace University; Polytechnic University; Ramapo College of New Jersey; Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; The Sage Colleges; The College of Saint Rose; Saint Thomas Aquinas College; Sarah Lawrence College; Sienna College; the State University of New York campuses at New Paltz, Purchase, Stony Brook and Albany; the SUNY community colleges of Westchester, Columbia-Greene, Rockland, and Ulster County; Union College and Vassar College.

The Pace Academy’s mission deepens a commitment to environmental studies that the university has made since the 1980s. The School of Law’s environmental law program, for instance, including the Environmental Litigation Clinic, founded by Cronin and now co-directed by Robert F. Kennedy Jr. is ranked third-best in the nation by U.S. News & World Report.

As a private metropolitan university, Pace has a growing national reputation for offering students opportunity, teaching and learning based on research, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. It is one of the ten founders of Project Pericles, developing education that encourages lifelong participation in democratic processes. Pace has seven campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. Approximately 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu.

Civil Society, Environmental Responsibility, and Sustainable Development in the U.S. and Brazil

Pace University will host a two-day conference, “Civil Society, Environmental Responsibility, and Sustainable Development in the United States and Brazil,” including prominent individuals drawn from academia, non-profits, and the corporate sector in both the U.S. and Brazil. The conference will focus on efforts in the U.S. and Brazil to develop reasonable policies aimed at environmental responsibility and sustainable development. Special consideration will be given to the roles that civil society actors are playing in shaping policies, practices, and fundamental legal and social structures in each country and in the larger international arena.

June 7, 2004

Contact: Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY

Pace University conference: “Civil Society, Environmental Responsibility, and Sustainable Development in the United States and Brazil,” Thursday, June 10 and Friday, June 11

Keynote speakers: Antonio Benjamin, Founder of Lawyers for a Green Planet; Kenneth Maxwell, Council on Foreign Relations; John Mizroch, President, World Environment Center; and Christopher Ward, Commissioner, NYC Department of Environmental Protection

WHAT: Pace University will host a two-day conference, “Civil Society, Environmental Responsibility, and Sustainable Development in the United States and Brazil,” including prominent individuals drawn from academia, non-profits, and the corporate sector in both the U.S. and Brazil. The conference will focus on efforts in the U.S. and Brazil to develop reasonable policies aimed at environmental responsibility and sustainable development. Special consideration will be given to the roles that civil society actors are playing in shaping policies, practices, and fundamental legal and social structures in each country and in the larger international arena.

WHO: Antonio Benjamin, Founder of Lawyers for a Green Planet; Kenneth Maxwell, Council on Foreign Relations; John Mizroch, President, World Environment Center; and Christopher Ward, Commissioner, NYC Department of Environmental Protection will be the keynote speakers. Presenters include Roger Bason, President, Marine and River Energy Systems (MARES) International, Ltd.; Jose Claudio de Araujo, Mayor of Paraty, Brazil; Sergio Trindade, President, SE2T International, Ltd. and former Assistant Secretary-General of the United Nations; and Patricia Wood, Founder and Executive Director, Grassroots Environmental Education.

WHEN: Thursday, June 10, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. (reception 5:30 to 7 p.m.) and Friday, June 11, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

WHERE: Pace University, 157 William Street, New York City

The conference agenda including the full list of presenters and topics of discussion is available at http://www.wti.pace.edu/brazilconference/BrazilConf04Agenda.pdf .

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university committed to opportunity, teaching and learning, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. It has seven campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. More than 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu

Higher Education Takes on the Environment

February 26, 2004 – Twenty-five colleges, including Marymount College of Fordham University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Columbia University, Vassar College, Bard College, Sarah Lawrence College and Pace University, will announce the official formation of Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges & Universities. The consortium is dedicated to improving the environment of the Hudson River Valley and will hold its first conference, February 27-28, Friday and Saturday in Tarrytown. The consortium was created in conjunction with Pace University’s Academy for the Environment, headed by the first Hudson Riverkeeper, John Cronin.

Contact:
Mary Horgan, Pace University, 914-923-2798, cell: 914-424-3845, mhorgan@pace.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY

HIGHER EDUCATION TAKES ON THE ENVIRONMENT

CHALLENGES OF THE HUDSON RIVER VALLEY TO BE EXPLORED AT CONFERENCE ON FUTURE

WHEN: February 27-28, Friday and Saturday

WHERE: Dolce Tarrytown House, East Sunnyside Lane, Tarrytown, NY

WHO:
Governor George E. Pataki
Congresswoman Nita Lowey
Dr. A. Karim Ahmed, Director, International Programs, Secretary- Treasurer of National Council for Science and the Environment
John Cronin, Director of the Pace Academy for the Environment

PLEASANTVILLE, NY — February 26, 2004 – Twenty-five colleges, including Marymount College of Fordham University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Columbia University, Vassar College, Bard College, Sarah Lawrence College and Pace University, will announce the official formation of Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges & Universities. The consortium is dedicated to improving the environment of the Hudson River Valley and will hold its first conference, February 27-28, Friday and Saturday in Tarrytown. The consortium was created in conjunction with Pace University’s Academy for the Environment, headed by the first Hudson Riverkeeper, John Cronin.

Council of Higher Education Leaders. Governor Pataki plans to announce the creation of a Council of Higher Education Leaders to help guide the Governor’s Rivers and Estuaries Center in best serving the needs of colleges and universities while fostering enlightened environmental policy.

The Center which will break ground in Beacon, NY this spring, was housed at Pace during its planning and development stages. David A. Caputo, President of Pace, has agreed to chair the new council.

“Higher education must become more engaged in the environment,” says Cronin. “Colleges and universities are the only institutions with the dual purposes of being multi-disciplinary and serving society, so they are the ideal candidates to marshal the knowledge and skills to deal with the complex issues of dealing with the environment. This coalition, and the interest in the Hudson by our political leaders, is an extremely encouraging sign.”

Media are welcome to attend the conference. Please register with Michelle Land at 914-473-0950.

Pace University to Host Environmental University Day for High School Students

Pace University will host nearly 300 high school students from Sleepy Hollow High School, John Jay High School, Woodlands High School, Hastings High School, Suffern High School Horace Greeley High School, Byram Hills High School, Brewster High School, Chester High School, Tuckahoe High School and Roosevelt High School for the annual Environmental University Day, October 22.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Mary E. Horgan, (914) 923-2798, mhorgan@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY TO HOST ENVIRONMENTAL UNIVERSITY DAY
FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

Protect Wetlands – Is it the Law?
Falconry exhibition

PLEASANTVILLE, N. Y. – October 17, 2002 – Pace University will host nearly 300 high school students from Sleepy Hollow High School, John Jay High School, Woodlands High School, Hastings High School, Suffern High School Horace Greeley High School, Byram Hills High School, Brewster High School, Chester High School, Tuckahoe High School and Roosevelt High School for the annual Environmental University Day, October 22.

Held annually since 2000 and drawing on Pace’s internationally-known programs in environmental studies and law the half-day program from 8:30 am to 1:00 pm is designed especially for high school students wishing to explore environmental issues and concerns that affect their daily lives, the lives of their families and communities, and who wish to take an active role in the future of the environment.

Presentations will be made by some of Pace’s best-known and popular faculty members, including John Cronin, the first Hudson Riverkeeper, Robert Chapman, coordinator and professor of environmental studies and Lee Paddock, director of Environmental Legal studies, who will pose the question: Protect Wetlands – Is it the Law?

Hands-on field studies led by Pace professors will be held outdoors throughout the campus. Topics include: The Aesthetics of Water, What are Female Frogs Like, The Aquatic Food Web, Wetlands: No Net Loss, The Web of Life, and Stream Insect Identity Search. Students will also witness a “Birds of Prey” demonstration by Master Falconer James Eyring.

When: Wednesday, October 22, 8:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.

Where: Gottesman room of the Kessel Campus Center, on the Pleasantville campus.
(see attached agenda for additional details and sites)

For registration details and more information on Environmental University Day contact Angelo Spillo, director of the Environmental Center in Pleasantville, (914) 773-3789 or aspillo@pace.edu

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart Airport in New Windsor. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School

“ENVIRONMENTAL UNIVERSITY 2003”
PACE UNIVERSITY, PLEASANTVILLE CAMPUS
OCTOBER 22

PROTECT WETLANDS – IS IT THE LAW?

8:30-8:50
REGISTRATION/REFRESHMENTS – Gottesman Room.

8:55-9:05
INTRODUCTIONS – Gottesman Room
John Cronin-Director, Pace Academy for the Environment
Dr. Richard Schlesinger-Chair, Department of Biological Sciences and
Director, Program in Environmental Sciences.
Angelo Spillo-Director, Pace University Environmental Center

9:10-9:35
PROTECT WETLANDS – IS IT THE LAW?
Professor Lee Paddock-Director of Environmental Legal Studies at Pace
University School of Law – Gottesman Room

9:40-10:25
“DO WE NEED THE PUBLIC TRUST DOCTRINE?” A Panel Presentation mediated by Dr. Robert Chapman-Coordinator of Environmental Studies – Lienhard Lecture Hall
Panelists:
Gus Karam – Professor of Economics and Environmental Studies
Michelle Land – Law and Environmental Studies

10:35-11:30 FIELD STUDY

The Aesthetics of Water ……….……………….. Prof. Flank (Choate Pond)
What Female Frogs Like?………………………. Prof. Schwartz (D108 Lab)
The Aquatic Food Web….……………..…………Prof. Pawlowski (Pond Rd.)
Wetlands: No Net Loss? …………………….….. Prof. C. Hoegler (Pond Rd.)
The Web of Life..…………..…….……………..… Prof. C. F. Hoegler (D110 LAB)
Stream Insect Identity Search………..………… Prof. M. Minnis (D201 LAB)

11:35-12:05 LUNCH – Gottesman Room

12:15-12:50 BIRDS OF PREY – Choate Lawn
James Eyring-Assistant Director, Pace Environmental Center

12:55-1:00 CONCLUSION

Sustainable Design Competition for Lower Manhattan to be Launched at Pace University Sept 4

On September 4, Green Ground Zero will launch the “Green Ground Zero Sustainable Design Competition” at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts on Pace University’s downtown campus. The competition is part of an ongoing effort to promote environmentally sophisticated urbanism in Lower Manhattan.

Contacts:
Erik Stowers, Green Ground Zero,
212.243.2664 or erik@greengroundzero.org
Chris Cory, Public Information, Pace University
212-346-1117, ccory@pace.edu

For immediate release

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN COMPETITION
FOR LOWER MANHATTAN
TO BE LAUNCHED AT PACE UNIVERSITY SEPT. 4.

Pioneering “green” designer William McDonough will give keynote speech,
introduced by Randolph Croxton, chair of 9/11 memorial jury.

“[William McDonough’s work] is grounded in a unified philosophy that-in demonstrable and practical ways-is changing the design of the world.”
–Time magazine

New York, August 20, 2003– On September 4, Green Ground Zero will launch the “Green Ground Zero Sustainable Design Competition” at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts on Pace University’s downtown campus. The competition is part of an ongoing effort to promote environmentally sophisticated urbanism in Lower Manhattan.

The presentations will begin at 6:30 pm at the Schimmel Center at the corner of Spruce and Gold streets, across from City Hall. The auditorium opens at 5:45; refreshments will be served. Attendees must RSVP to neil@greengroundzero.org.

The famed “green” designer William McDonough will give the evening’s keynote speech. McDonough is internationally known as and one of the primary exponents and shapers of what he and his partners call “The Next Industrial Revolution.” He will be introduced by Randolph Croxton, another leader in environmentally sensitive architecture, who is the chair of the jury for the 9/11 memorial competition.

The event is sponsored by the Center for Downtown New York (CDNY), part of a University that is known for environmental research and education in both New York City and Westchester County.

Architecture to greenery. The competition encourages applicants from every field and background to elaborate visions of a sustainable Lower Manhattan. Submissions will deal with aspects of sustainability ranging from architecture and transportation to greenery and energy usage for all of Lower Manhattan with a special focus on the area surrounding the World Trade Center site.

The competition’s aim is to capture the public’s imagination with innovative proposals and thereby initiate a lively debate about the environmental future of Lower Manhattan. The competition will also provide an opportunity to showcase the work of the many groups that have already addressed ecological, health, and quality of life aspects of downtown redevelopment.

The Green Ground Zero Sustainable Design Competition is organized by New York Climate Rescue and Democratic Leadership for the Twenty-First Century. Green Ground Zero is a nonpartisan organization whose partners include CDNY, the Natural Resources Defense Council, the American Institute of Architects, the Green House Network, Earth Pledge, Pop Sustainability and Metropolis magazine. Details of the competition and launch event are posted on the Green Ground Zero website at http://www.greengroundzero.org.

Those seeking more information should contact Marc Brammer, Event Director, 646-237-0217, marc@greengroundzero.org; Neil Chambers, Competition Director, 646-424-4068, neil@greengroundzero.org; or Erik Stowers, Executive Director, 212.243.2664, erik@greengroundzero.org, or visit the website, www.greengroundzero.org

CDNY was created by David A. Caputo, President of Pace University, to serve the lower Manhattan community as an academic, civic, and research leadership partner in the revitalization effort.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Pleasantville, Briarcliff and White Plains, NY and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport in New Windsor, NY. More than 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu.

Expo set to show post-blackout energy alternatives

An all-inclusive, “how to do it” fair and conference demonstrating smart, clean energy solutions will take place Friday and Saturday, September 12 and 13, at Bear Mountain Inn and State Park.

For immediate release.
Photo/TV assignment editors: Please note visual opportunities below

Contact:
Dorice Madronero, Event Coordinator
Pace University Energy Project
Phone: 914/422-4415 (home 845-368-3414),Fax: 914/422-4180
E-Mail: dmadronero@law.pace.edu
Website: http://www.rechargeexpo.com

Blackout alternatives?
SMART, CLEAN ENERGY IDEAS
FOR TOWNS, BUSINESSES, HOMES, KIDS
TO BE FEATURED IN ENERGY FAIR
AT BEAR MOUNTAIN SEPT. 12-13

“Market transformation” event is supported
by energy agencies, companies and advocates
from Sharp Electronics to US Department of Energy

White Plains, NY, August 20 —Talk about relevance to recent news.

An all-inclusive, “how to do it” fair and conference demonstrating smart, clean energy solutions will take place Friday and Saturday, September 12 and 13, at Bear Mountain Inn and State Park.

Exhibitors and presenters at the “ReCharge” energy expo will feature cutting-edge technologies and services like fuel cells, photovoltaic (PV) products, hybrid vehicles, geothermal designs and lighting solutions from energy-use audits to LED flashlights.

Demonstrations include a fuel cell unit the size of a refrigerator that can power a house or a small store, a six-foot wind turbine and a solar hot tub.

Energy efficiency, renewable energy products and innovations will be featured for businesses, residences, municipalities, institutions and kids. Partner and supporting organizations will talk about technologies, financial incentives and opportunities that support a market transformation toward greater energy efficiency, environmentally sustainable building practices and use of renewable energy.

Public officials, businesses and energy entrepreneurs will attend Friday sessions. Saturday’s program includes demonstrations for homeowners and families.

Blue-chip sponsors. The event is being presented by the Energy Project at Pace University’s law school, ranked third in the nation for environmental law, and co-hosted by the Palisades Interstate Park Commission (PIPC).

Participants and endorsers include a blue-chip roster of companies, government agencies and advocacy groups. They range from Sharp Electronics, Inc. and Paul Miller Toyota to the New York State Energy Research Development Authority (NYSERDA), the New York Power Authority (NYPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the New York State Public Service Commission (NYSPSC), and the Rockland County Solid Waste Management Authority (RCSWMA).

“It is evident now more than ever that we must move toward a more sustainable energy future. This event offers a wonderful opportunity for everyone to learn how,” said Carol Ash, Executive Director of the PIPC. “PIPC is thrilled to be hosting this event and we look forward to hosting many more.”

Added Fred Zalcman, Executive Director of Pace Energy Project: “Energy choices influence energy costs, reliability, security, the environment and public health. The vision of this expo and conference is an outgrowth of our advocacy work to support clean energy alternatives that are available here and now.”

Peter Smith, Acting President of NYSERDA, will make opening remarks at Friday’s conference. NYSERDA administers the New York Energy $martSM program which is designed to help businesses and residents in the state reduce their energy costs, as well as protect the environment and strengthen the state’s economy. After Mr. Smith’s opening remarks an extensive panel of leading industry experts will guide participants through that they can take toward a more sustainable energy future.

Smith said: “It is more critical than ever that people are aware of the kinds of energy efficiency and renewable energy programs available to help them save energy and reduce their energy costs. Governor Pataki and NYSERDA support these programs to protect our environment, increase economic development, and ensure a secure energy future.”

Buildings, energy loads, purchasing. Commercial and municipal tracks are being offered on topics that include: Global Environmental Leadership: Showing the Way to a Sustainable Energy Future Through Corporate Policies and Products; Energy Savings Opportunities for Existing Commercial & Institutional Buildings; Controlling Electricity Loads: Strategies for Demand Reduction; The Power of Choice: Green Purchasing Options; Municipalities as Leaders: NYS executive order 111 and the Challenge to Local Municipal Governments.

Municipal officials who have successfully installed programs to buy solar energy or used other policy tools will be “role models” for other municipalities interested in energy efficiency and conservation. A panel of energy entrepreneurs will explain new methods businesses can use to reduce costs and save energy.

At Saturday’s ongoing workshops and displays, attendees can learn from industry professionals, governmental agencies and community advocacy groups and get questions answered. Topics that day include: solar energy, wind energy, clean energy credits (“green tags”), Energy Star appliances, Energy $mart Communities, and much more.

Activities, art projects and music provided by the RCSWMA Education Center will teach young people about simple sustainable energy solutions within their reach.

Those interested in more information can visit the website, www.rechargeexpo.com, or contact Dorice Madronero at the Pace Energy Project, phone 914/422-4415 or E-Mail dmadronero@law.pace.edu.

The Pace University Energy Project has been a primary provider of legal advocacy, coordination, technical and policy support, education and outreach to a broad range of sustainable energy stakeholders since 1987.

The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority’s (NYSERDA) New York Energy $martSM program is designed to lower electricity costs by encouraging energy efficiency as the State’s electric utilities move to competition. The programs are available to all electric distribution customers (residential, commercial, institutional and industrial) of Central Hudson, Con Edison, NYSEG, Niagara Mohawk, Orange and Rockland, and Rochester Gas and Electric.

All New York Energy $martSM programs are funded by a System Benefits Charge (SBC) paid by electric distribution customers of participating utilities. NYSERDA, a public benefit corporation established by law in 1975, administers SBC funds and programs under an agreement with the Public Service Commission.