World renowned business expert and bestselling author Rosabeth Moss Kanter to speak at Pace

World renowned business expert, Harvard University professor, and bestselling author Rosabeth Moss Kanter will visit Pace University to discuss her new book: SuperCorp: How Vanguard Companies Create Innovation, Profits, Growth, and Social Good, a manifesto for leadership of sustainable enterprises.

September 24, 2009 MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact: Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

ROSABETH MOSS KANTER, WORLD RENOWNED BUSINESS THINKER, TO SPEAK AT PACE UNIVERSITY ON SUSTAINABLE ENTERPRISES

WHO and WHAT: World renowned business expert, Harvard University professor, and bestselling author Rosabeth Moss Kanter will visit Pace University to discuss her new book: SuperCorp: How Vanguard Companies Create Innovation, Profits, Growth, and Social Good, a manifesto for leadership of sustainable enterprises. The event is coordinated by the Business Honors Program of Pace’s Lubin School of Business.

WHEN: Wednesday September 30, from 2-4pm

WHERE: Pace University, One Pace Plaza, Lecture Hall South, Downtown New York City campus (just East of City Hall).

Background: Named one of the “50 most powerful women” and “50 most influential business thinkers” in the world, Kanter’s message is relevant for the global recession and beyond: how companies can use their power not only for profits but for social good. She says this replaces a failed model of capitalism that brought the financial crisis with a new model for conducting business in the public interest. Vanguard companies have a strong sense of values and social purpose at the heart of the enterprise, wanting it to endure and mean something beyond current transactions. She says they have proven that virtue brings rewards by out-performing their peers during the recession. She shows how they do it in insider stories from IBM, Procter & Gamble, Publicis Groupe (the French advertising-marketing behemoth that just moved up to the #3 position in the world), and many others. The book is optimistic — arguing that there is a better way to operate that creates innovation and is good for employees and communities – but it also takes a hard look at the dark side of global capitalism before describing how to develop better leaders. About Pace. For 103 years Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, it has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Jammin’ for a Smart Planet

Eight of 10 students want universities to revamp traditional learning environments while over 90 percent want to join or start a Green Advocacy group at their campus. 64 percent of students believe that the world has a chance to reverse carbon emissions by 2025, and 60 percent believe that education and efficient transportation offer the best hope for sustainability of our cities.

PACE STUDENTS HELP THINK UP A ‘SMART PLANET’ IN ONLINE JAM WITH IBM AND THE WORLD

The release below describes the collaborative participation of Pace University classes in Computer Science and Environmental Science during a three-day, on-line, global jam session (AKA ‘crowd sourcing’) that produced interesting findings about worldwide student attitudes. Taylor Vogt, a Pace political science major, was one of 20 students among the nearly 2000 participants to earn a merit award for “insightful and innovative contributions to the Jam discussion on how technology and business can help build a smarter planet in areas such as energy, traffic, water, education and healthcare.”

The release was sent today by IBM.

Media contact: Tim Willeford IBM 914-766-3389 twilleford@us.ibm.com

Students See into the Future during IBM Jam; Faculty and Students from 40 Countries Collaborate with IBM to Build a Smarter Planet

IBM to Launch Facebook Student Mentoring Program, Unveils New Faculty Awards for Leading Jam Contributors

ARMONK, N.Y. – July 29, 2009: Eight of 10 students want universities to revamp traditional learning environments while over 90 percent want to join or start a Green Advocacy group at their campus. 64 percent of students believe that the world has a chance to reverse carbon emissions by 2025, and 60 percent believe that education and efficient transportation offer the best hope for sustainability of our cities.

These are just a few of the findings of a remarkable crowdsourcing process held by IBM (NYSE: IBM) called the Smarter Planet University Jam.

Nearly 2,000 students from more than 200 universities from 40 countries around the world took part in the Jam, showing that students around the world are eagerly seeking opportunities to work together with industry to create a Smarter Planet, and they are extremely optimistic about the future.

“The Smarter Planet University Jam was the first time that so many university-aged students came together in an online forum to brainstorm ideas to better our world,” said Jai Menon, vice president of technical strategy and university programs, IBM.

“Students are confident that their future will be a smarter place – a world where they will drive cars that get 100 miles per gallon, learn in virtual classrooms connected with students across the globe, and where they can run their businesses on a secure, energy-efficient and interconnected grid. They are boldly challenging the industry to transform that vision into their reality, and IBM is committed to meeting that challenge.”

In view of the Jam’s findings, following IBM’s announcement in June of a remote mentoring program for university students by IBM employees in India, IBM plans to expand remote mentoring worldwide after refinement of the pilot program in India.

IBM also announced plans to launch an online employee/student mentoring program on Facebook.

Jam Results

“Jammers” contributed hundreds of progressive insights during the massive crowdsourcing session, brainstorming on topics including the skills students need to be competitive in the globally integrated economy; environmental protection, water management and conservation; fostering pollution-free and inexpensive energy; and providing advanced healthcare as the world’s population continues to grow rapidly, especially in developing nations.

IBM’s report highlights the results of the Jam, which pointed to the positive outlook that students have about how they can affect the future as well as confirmed their incredible thoughts on education, going green, and other ideas to build a smarter planet.

Skills for a Globally Integrated Economy

Jammers foresaw the need to create a new model of university education around smarter campuses, which are interconnected, enriched and fed by on-the-ground knowledge being developed over social networks. Universities would incorporate broader use of virtual environments and videoconferencing to enhance learning, interaction, networking and communication.

In a poll conducted during the Jam, 82 percent of those polled believed that “virtual worlds” are a great place to learn these future skills.

Jammers also discussed that success in the services-based global economy requires academia, government, and industry to work together to create “T-shaped” people with deep knowledge in one discipline and broader knowledge in other areas. To meet this need, IBM has pioneered an interdisciplinary curriculum called Service Science, Management and Engineering (SSME), and is currently working with 250 universities around the globe.

Jammers identified project-based teams – across geographical, disciplinary and institutional boundaries – as the preferred model for this interdisciplinary education, ensuring a mix of business, technical and liberal arts knowledge for the development of richer, more innovative solutions.

Green and Beyond

The report also showed that this generation is definitely going green. Faculty and student jam participants contributed over 100 examples and ideas of how their universities are, or could be, “going green”, including:

• Using deterrents like expensive campus parking to encourage walking, extra charges for plastic bags in all campus shops, and setting weekly printing limits.

• Solar powered and LEED-certified campus buildings, and electric campus vehicles, to promote smart energy use.

Other Jam Highlights

Other highlights from the Smarter Planet University Jam emerged from the following areas:

• Smart Water Management: Jammers discussed the need to change the cost structure of water usage and to make policy changes to address the current lack of incentives to save water.

• Smarter Healthcare: Great discussions focused in on personalized health via mobile devices, which could be equipped with specialized diagnostic tools useful in chronic diseases management, specifically mentioned in the context of improving healthcare in developing countries.

• Smart Grid: Jammers saw the need for incentives for the private sector to innovate “in the open” and share via open source technology when appropriate, yet still be able to generate profits. Jam participants also voiced the need to create secure, attack resistant networks.

• Smart Cities: Jammers highlighted the potential use of Online Gaming, Augmented Reality, and 3D Worlds for involving citizens in planning the future of their cities. They agreed that virtual reality enables faster and cheaper assessment of ideas about Smart Cities than with real implementation.

Jammers contributed other insights around creating Smarter Transportation systems – including vehicles running from solar, electric, and other alternate energy sources including manual human leg power – and Smart Evacuation Systems.

Several universities held Jam sessions during class or hosted special events on campus.

Pace University combined Computer Science and Environmental Studies classes to jam together on its campus in Pleasantville, New York. “The Smarter Planet University Jam was one of the most exciting and innovative experiences I have ever been a part of. IBM is setting the standard for the corporate world to start learning from the people that depend on them,” said Taylor Vogt, a student majoring in political science at Pace University. “This kind of free-flowing forum is extremely vital to the sustainability movement, where far too often good ideas are never shared or worse, never listened to. I was proud to be a part of this experience.”

Both university faculty and administration were actively involved in the Jam. “The IBM Smarter Planet University Jam provided an excellent forum for our students and faculty to explore using technology to drive smart growth and innovation with people around the world,” said Dr. Yi Deng, director and professor, School of Computer Science, Florida International University. “I am happy to see IBM once again take the lead in combining business with social responsibility.”

Faculty Awards and Student Recognition

Two faculty members stood out as Jammers with unusual perception and ability to think forward. The top faculty contributor was Dr. Ismail Ari, assistant professor of electrical engineering at Ozyegin University in Instanbul, Turkey. Dr. Ari will receive an IBM Faculty Award to seed collaborative research with IBM in Smarter Planet topic areas of mutual interest. Some of his notable contributions included metrics for smart cities, the use of augmented reality to involve citizens in city planning, and development of smart evacuation systems.

A second IBM Faculty Award for research in Services Science, Management and Engineering (SSME) went to Ravi Nemana, executive director of SSME of the Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS) at the University of California, Berkeley. Professor Nemana contributed key ideas and insights, including discussion on smarter healthcare for emerging regions and ideas for mobile applications that integrate social networks to help individuals manage their healthcare.

IBM also recognized 20 students for their insightful and innovative contributions to the Jam. The full report, including the list of top student contributors from around the globe, and podcast interviews with Jai Menon and the Faculty Award winners, is available at www.ibm.com/university/smartplanet_jam.

In addition, a blog with a deeper view from Jai Menon is available at www.asmarterplanet.com. More information about IBM’s Smarter Planet Education and university efforts is available at www.ibm.com/press/smarterplaneteducation or www.ibm.com/press/university.

Pace Law Energy and Climate Center Director Among First in NY to Use Zero Emission Car for Research

As executive director of Pace Law School’s Energy and Climate Center, White Plains’ James Van Nostrand is used to leading the way when it comes to the environment, but today he became a pioneer of a different sort as he is one of the first customers in the New York metropolitan area to take delivery of the fully electric, zero emissions MINI E—as part of a year-long field study.

Pace Law School 78 North Broadway White Plains, NY 10603

Rubenstein Communications, Inc – Public Relations Contact: Gladwyn Lopez – 212-843-9231; glopez@rubenstein.com Robin Wagge – 212-843-8006; rwagge@rubenstein.com Regina Pappalardo – 914-422-4268; rpappalardo@law.pace.edu

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

PACE LAW SCHOOL ENERGY AND CLIMATE CENTER EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR AMONG FIRST CUSTOMERS IN NEW YORK METROPOLITAN AREA TO TAKE DELIVERY OF FULLY ELECTRIC, ZERO EMISSIONS MINI E VEHICLE

Vehicle Use to be Incorporated into Research Project Studying the Implications of Widespread Deployment of Electric Plug-in Vehicles in New York State

WHITE PLAINS, NY – JUNE 16, 2009 — As executive director of Pace Law School’s Energy and Climate Center, White Plains’ James Van Nostrand is used to leading the way when it comes to the environment, but today he became a pioneer of a different sort as he is one of the first customers in the New York metropolitan area to take delivery of the fully electric, zero emissions MINI E—as part of a year-long field study.

Van Nostrand is one of several hundred eager participants chosen by MINI to begin the field study, which will see 450 MINI Es deployed in the New York and New Jersey metropolitan area, and Los Angeles with additional vehicles being tested in Berlin and Munich, Germany, and London, England.

Always the dedicated scholar, Van Nostrand will conduct his own study and plans to utilize his time with the MINI E to research the planning and regulatory implications of widespread deployment of plug-in electric vehicles in New York. “I am pleased to have been chosen by MINI to participate in this pioneering field study and everyone at Pace is excited as well,” said Van Nostrand. “On the automaker side MINI is doing its part to make sure that sustainable, environment-friendly vehicles become a reality. It is now up to legislators and regulators to do what is necessary to make sure that proper utility pricing is in place to accommodate the demands that will be placed on the electric system by these types of vehicles when they are ready for mass production.”

For his MINI E, Van Nostrand and his team have created magnetic signs for the doors with the Climate Center’s new logo and will treat it as their “staff car.” “Our MINI E research project is designed to help shape future New York State energy policy and bring us one step closer to a future of zero emissions vehicles,” said Van Nostrand. “Widespread use of electric vehicles makes sense only if they are recharged in the middle of the night, when power is cheap and plentiful. But electric customers need to have the right price signals – such as through time-of-use rates – to know the time of day when electricity use makes the most sense. New York State law currently prohibits utilities from requiring time-of-use rates for their residential customers, and customers therefore do not have the information to make wise choices about when to use electricity.” According to Van Nostrand, “electric bills will go up for everyone if electric car owners recharge their vehicles during the ‘peak’ times of the day – in the late afternoon – rather than waiting until the ‘off-peak’ periods.”

The 450 U.S. vehicles will be leased to customers like Van Nostrand, who applied online at MINIUSA.com to be part of the one-year field study, and a portion will also be used as fleet vehicles. The fleet vehicles will be dedicated to full-time extensive and intense daily use in certain fleets, such as the NYC Street Condition Observation Unit (SCOUT) and those that are being provided to the city of Los Angeles. As part of their participation in the field study, Van Nostrand and the others chosen will provide ongoing real world use feedback to MINI on their experiences with the zero-emission electric cars. More than twice the number of people applied as there are cars available in the U.S.

The MINI E can travel around 100 miles on a single charge depending on driving style and conditions, while providing the agility and handling of a MINI Cooper. It is powered by a 150 kilowatt electric motor with the equivalent of 201 hp. The energy supply comes from a high-performance rechargeable lithium-ion battery. The vehicle, which debuted at the Los Angeles Auto Show in November 2008, can accelerate from 0 to 62 mph in 8.5 seconds and has an electronically limited top speed of 95 mph. MINI will install a special wall box into each MINI E customer’s garage that can fully recharge a completely drained battery in just two-and-a-half hours.

Founded in 1987 by Dean Emeritus Richard L. Ottinger, a former member of Congress, the Pace Energy and Climate Center (formerly the Pace Energy Project) plays a leading role in a national coalition of environmental and consumer advocates who are working to create win-win energy policy solutions for America’s economy and environment: to reduce the environmental impact associated with the production and use of energy by promoting clean, efficient and renewable energy alternatives and addressing the barriers to implementation of clean energy technologies.

Founded in 1976, Pace University School of Law has nearly 6,700 alumni throughout the country and the world. It offers full- and part-time day and evening JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus. With its Environmental Law program consistently ranked among the top three in the nation (US News & World Report), the School also offers the Master of Laws in Environmental Law, Real Estate Law and in Comparative Legal Studies and an SJD in Environmental Law. Pace was the first law school in the country to offer a course of study focused on climate change law, which is included as a specialty “track” as part of its Master of Laws in Environmental Law. The School of Law is part of a comprehensive, independent and diversified University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County www.law.pace.edu

Pace Energy and Climate Center Receives $1.25 Million in Grants to Conduct Studies

The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) has announced that a team led by the Energy and Climate Center at Pace Law School will perform a $750,000 study to develop a state “roadmap” to increased use of biofuels.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Jennifer Riekert (914) 422-4128 jriekert@law.pace.edu

Pace Energy and Climate Center Chosen to Prepare State “Roadmap” for Renewable Fuels

Pace-Led Team on Tight Deadline Includes Researchers from Cornell, SUNY, and Leading Energy and Environmental Consulting Firms

WHITE PLAINS, NY – The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) has announced that a team led by the Energy and Climate Center at Pace Law School will perform a $750,000 study to develop a state “roadmap” to increased use of biofuels.

Intended to help guide state policy on renewable fuels, the roadmap was one of several recommendations from Governor David A Paterson’s Renewable Energy Task Force report issued in February, 2008. The project will include a study of sources of sustainable biomass feedstocks, the raw materials for biofuels.

It also will look at impacts that increased use of renewable fuels might have on economic development, energy supplies and diversity, the environment, and public health.

The roadmap is to be completed during the fourth quarter of 2009.

Agriculture and woody biomass. To conduct the study, the Pace Energy and Climate Center has assembled a team of the leading authorities on biofuels throughout the Northeast, including researchers from Cornell University and the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, and from consulting firms on energy and environmental issues such as Energetics, Energy and Environmental Research Associates, and Antares Group. The coalition known as Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management as well as Cornell Cooperative Extension branches throughout New York State are also members of the Pace-led team.

The team includes experts in agriculture and woody biomass feedstock production, biofuel production processes, biofuel industry economics, economic development, environmental assessment, public outreach and participation, and related public policy development.

Biomass-based liquid fuels, or biofuels, potentially can play a large role in reducing the state’s emissions of greenhouse gases, which are a leading contributor to global warming.

Three state agencies – NYSERDA, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, and the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets – will oversee development of the renewable fuels roadmap.

Using agricultural and industrial capacity. James Van Nostrand, the energy and environmental lawyer who is executive director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center, said: “In the State of New York we are challenged to move away from reliance on fossil fuels to fulfill our energy needs. At the same time, we have a tremendous opportunity to use New York’s significant agricultural and industrial capacity to develop conventional and non-conventional, or advanced, biofuels for sale in-state and throughout the Northeast.”

He added, “The economic development potential is huge.”

The project team will be led by Zywia Wojnar, program manager of Science and Policy Partnerships at the Pace Energy and Climate Center, who has an extensive science and management background, including several years in private industry where she acquired broad-based expertise in diverse environmental areas.

Markets for biofuels. The 2007 federal Energy Independence and Security Act, enacted in December 2007, established a national Renewable Fuels Standard of 15 billion gallons of conventional biofuels and 21 billion gallons of advanced biofuels by 2022.

“This could ensure large markets for biofuels well into the future,” Wojnar stated. “The biofuels roadmap will provide valuable guidance for New York policymakers to determine our role in fulfilling this national energy policy to reduce both our dependence on foreign oil and the emission of harmful greenhouse gases.”

Also on the project management team from the Pace Energy and Climate Center is Sam Swanson, Senior Policy Advisor. Swanson has over twenty years of experience in energy and environmental regulation, including several years in a senior policy position at the New York Public Service Commission on energy research and development issues.

Environmental law leadership. The Energy and Climate Center is an integral part of Pace Law School’s environmental law program, which regularly is ranked by U.S. News & World Report as one of the nation’s top environmental law programs. For over 20 years, the Energy and Climate Center has been a leading multi-disciplinary organization in the areas of environmental research and policy on energy issues in New York and throughout the Northeast, while training law students in these areas.

Founded in 1976, Pace University School of Law has nearly 6,700 alumni throughout the country and the world. It offers full- and part-time day and evening JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus. The School also offers the Master of Laws in Environmental Law, Real Estate Law and in Comparative Legal Studies and an SJD in environmental law. The School of Law is part of a comprehensive, independent, and diversified University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu

Do investments in a green economy equal jobs, a cleaner environment, and improved national security?

Jamie Van Nostrand, executive director of the Energy and Climate Center at Pace Law School, is available to help analyze any of approximately 16 line items in the stimulus bill that cover energy, including smart grid technology the laws regulating smart grids, ethanol and why so many plants are closing.

Contact: Jennifer Riekert, (914) 422-4128, jriekert@law.pace.edu

NEWS SOURCE

Topic: Do investments in a green economy equal jobs, a cleaner environment, and improved national security?

Jamie Van Nostrand, executive director of the Energy and Climate Center at Pace Law School, is available to help analyze any of approximately 16 line items in the stimulus bill that cover energy, including smart grid technology the laws regulating smart grids, ethanol and why so many plants are closing.

Currently leading an expert team from the Pace Energy and Climate Center to develop a state “roadmap” to increase use of biofuels, he is a leading expert on integrating transportation and energy policies to reduce greenhouse gasses, energy efficiency, renewable energy policy, and climate change. He is on the New York City Energy Policy Task Force, the advisory board regarding the use of auction proceeds from the Northeast Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), the CHP Working Group of the Governor’s Renewable Energy Task Force, and the NY State Bar Association Global Warming Task Force. He teaches energy law at Pace Law School.

Contact Van Nostrand at 914-422-4082 (office); 914-830-8055 (cell); jvannostrand@law.pace.edu

“What remains to be seen is whether the President has the political will to follow through on implementing his energy and climate agenda in the face of tough economic times,”said Van Nostrand. “He clearly understands the urgency of the climate change issue and the need to act quickly to start reducing greenhouse gas emissions. He has appointed respected, credentialed experts, such as Dr. Steven Chu at the Department of Energy, to the important energy and environmental positions. Having an individual in the White House in charge of climate issues indicates an understanding of the need for a climate solution that integrates both transportation and energy to achieve meaningful reductions in greenhouse gases.”

In his 22-year career in private practice, Van Nostrand represented energy clients in state regulatory proceedings in eight western states, as well as proceedings before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Before that he spent five years with the New York Public Service Commission. In 2007 he was recognized by the Energy Bar Association as its “State Regulatory Practitioner of the Year,” and has been included for the last several years on “The Best Lawyers in America.”

The Pace Energy and Climate Center is an integral part of Pace Law School’s environmental law program, which is consistently ranked among the nation’s top three programs in environmental law.

Founded in 1976, Pace University School of Law has nearly 6,700 alumni throughout the country and the world. It offers full- and part-time day and evening JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus and offers the Master of Laws degree in Environmental Law, Real Estate Law and Comparative Legal Studies, and a Doctor of Laws in environmental law. The School of Law is part of Pace University, a comprehensive, independent, and diversified university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu

Pace is First to Convert Fleet to Extended Performance Oil Filter as Part of Sustainable Initiatives

SOMS Technologies LLC, a provider of engine oil filtration products, today announced that Pace University is using the microGreen™ extended performance oil filter in its entire fleet of campus vehicles. By installing SOMS’ microGreen oil filters, the University’s vehicles now operate up to 24,000 miles without an oil change, saving an estimated 650 gallons of motor oil and over 30% in oil-related maintenance costs within a 12 to 18 month period.

For Immediate Release

Pace University Converts Campus Fleet to SOMS Technologies’ microGreen Extended Performance Oil Filter

Saves 650 gallons of oil and over 30% in oil-related maintenance costs

Valhalla, New York – December 16, 2008 – SOMS Technologies LLC, a provider of engine oil filtration products, today announced that Pace University is using the microGreen™ extended performance oil filter in its entire fleet of campus vehicles. By installing SOMS’ microGreen oil filters, the University’s vehicles now operate up to 24,000 miles without an oil change, saving an estimated 650 gallons of motor oil and over 30% in oil-related maintenance costs within a 12 to 18 month period.

Pace University is currently installing the microGreen filter on its entire fleet of approximately 60 vehicles, including cars, vans and buses. Pace was part of the initial fleet testing program for the microGreen filter and the results validated the filter’s patented technology, which extends the life of engine oil through advanced filtration. During the testing period, oil samples from several vehicles were thoroughly analyzed by an independent laboratory for particulate contamination, wear metals, viscosity and overall chemistry every 3,000 miles. The test results revealed that the filter maintained oil cleanliness and oil quality over 24,000 miles without depleting the additives.

“With over 35 years of experience in maintenance repair, I was fascinated when I first heard about the microGreen filter. The filter technology is a huge leap in oil maintenance, yet is contained in a standard spin-on canister so it is easy to install and use. I was interested enough to initiate testing on a few vehicles, and at each testing interval, the laboratory reports clearly showed the product was truly remarkable,” said Andrew Mendola, shift supervisor for Pace University’s Department of Transportation. “Pace University has a clear mission of becoming environmentally-friendly, and the microGreen filter is helping us reach that goal. We will cut the amount of filters we dispose of in half and reduce our oil disposal by over 70% – all this while reducing our oil and filter maintenance costs.”

Pace University’s fleet of vehicles are used by university employees for internal departments and student shuttle services between campuses or to student activities. As the first university to implement the microGreen filter, this deployment underscores the university’s commitment to preserving the environment through sustainable practices.

“Pace University is paving the way for universities, and other fleets, to adopt environmentally-friendly practices while reducing maintenance costs, and we are excited to be a part of this initiative,” said Miles Flamenbaum, CEO of SOMS Technologies. “SOMS developed the microGreen filter to provide an eco-friendly, cost-saving alternative to vehicle maintenance and we are fulfilling this mission through fleets such as Pace University.”

The microGreen oil filter launched in October 2008 and is compatible with vehicles equipped with a traditional spin-on oil filter canister. It is now sold through authorized distributors across the U.S. and online at www.microgreenfilter.com.

About SOMS Technologies LLC

SOMS (Spin-On Microfilter System™) Technologies has pioneered the most significant breakthrough in engine oil filtration technology since the early 1970s. Developed by SOMS, the microGreen™ Extended Performance Oil Filter significantly reduces maintenance costs for both individual vehicles and fleets, and protects our environment by eliminating hazardous waste and decreasing dependence on natural resources. The microGreen oil filter combines 2 filters in 1, providing a clean technology that dramatically improves filtration efficiency, allowing vehicles to operate up to 8 times the standard change interval without changing the engine oil. The microGreen oil filter has recently been introduced to the market and has been overwhelmingly accepted by leading national and local fleets. The microGreen filter is protected by 2 U.S. patents and has additional U.S. and international patents pending. The company is headquartered in Valhalla, New York. For more information, please visit http://www.microgreenfilter.com.

Press Contact: Brianna Schweitzer Vantage Communications for SOMS Technologies 813 531 7149 bschweitzer@pr-vantage.com

For Immediate Release

Pace University Converts Campus Fleet to SOMS Technologies’ microGreen Extended Performance Oil Filter

Saves 650 gallons of oil and over 30% in oil-related maintenance costs

Valhalla, New York – December 16, 2008 – SOMS Technologies LLC, a provider of engine oil filtration products, today announced that Pace University is using the microGreen™ extended performance oil filter in its entire fleet of campus vehicles. By installing SOMS’ microGreen oil filters, the University’s vehicles now operate up to 24,000 miles without an oil change, saving an estimated 650 gallons of motor oil and over 30% in oil-related maintenance costs within a 12 to 18 month period.

Pace University is currently installing the microGreen filter on its entire fleet of approximately 60 vehicles, including cars, vans and buses. Pace was part of the initial fleet testing program for the microGreen filter and the results validated the filter’s patented technology, which extends the life of engine oil through advanced filtration. During the testing period, oil samples from several vehicles were thoroughly analyzed by an independent laboratory for particulate contamination, wear metals, viscosity and overall chemistry every 3,000 miles. The test results revealed that the filter maintained oil cleanliness and oil quality over 24,000 miles without depleting the additives.

“With over 35 years of experience in maintenance repair, I was fascinated when I first heard about the microGreen filter. The filter technology is a huge leap in oil maintenance, yet is contained in a standard spin-on canister so it is easy to install and use. I was interested enough to initiate testing on a few vehicles, and at each testing interval, the laboratory reports clearly showed the product was truly remarkable,” said Andrew Mendola, shift supervisor for Pace University’s Department of Transportation. “Pace University has a clear mission of becoming environmentally-friendly, and the microGreen filter is helping us reach that goal. We will cut the amount of filters we dispose of in half and reduce our oil disposal by over 70% – all this while reducing our oil and filter maintenance costs.”

Pace University’s fleet of vehicles are used by university employees for internal departments and student shuttle services between campuses or to student activities. As the first university to implement the microGreen filter, this deployment underscores the university’s commitment to preserving the environment through sustainable practices.

“Pace University is paving the way for universities, and other fleets, to adopt environmentally-friendly practices while reducing maintenance costs, and we are excited to be a part of this initiative,” said Miles Flamenbaum, CEO of SOMS Technologies. “SOMS developed the microGreen filter to provide an eco-friendly, cost-saving alternative to vehicle maintenance and we are fulfilling this mission through fleets such as Pace University.”

The microGreen oil filter launched in October 2008 and is compatible with vehicles equipped with a traditional spin-on oil filter canister. It is now sold through authorized distributors across the U.S. and online at www.microgreenfilter.com.

About SOMS Technologies LLC

SOMS (Spin-On Microfilter System™) Technologies has pioneered the most significant breakthrough in engine oil filtration technology since the early 1970s. Developed by SOMS, the microGreen™ Extended Performance Oil Filter significantly reduces maintenance costs for both individual vehicles and fleets, and protects our environment by eliminating hazardous waste and decreasing dependence on natural resources. The microGreen oil filter combines 2 filters in 1, providing a clean technology that dramatically improves filtration efficiency, allowing vehicles to operate up to 8 times the standard change interval without changing the engine oil. The microGreen oil filter has recently been introduced to the market and has been overwhelmingly accepted by leading national and local fleets. The microGreen filter is protected by 2 U.S. patents and has additional U.S. and international patents pending. The company is headquartered in Valhalla, New York. For more information, please visit http://www.microgreenfilter.com.

Press Contact: Brianna Schweitzer Vantage Communications for SOMS Technologies 813 531 7149 bschweitzer@pr-vantage.com

Pace Accepts Bloomberg Challenge, Announces First Climate Change Track in Environmental Law Masters

Pace University today accepted Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg’s Challenge for reducing its emissions of greenhouse gasses by 30 percent in the next ten years. At the same time, the University, which is widely recognized for its environmental activities, announced that it has joined the Climate Initiative of former President Bill Clinton, and that it is launching the nation’s first climate change track in a Masters of Environmental Law curriculum.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Cara Halstead Cea, 914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.eduGreen university gets three ways greener

PACE UNIVERSITY ACCEPTS BLOOMBERG CHALLENGE TO REDUCE CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS 30% BY 2018, JOINS CLINTON CLIMATE INITIATIVE, ANNOUNCES NATION’S FIRST MASTERS OF ENVIRONMENTAL LAW CLIMATE CHANGE TRACK

NEW YORK, NY, October 23, 2008 – Pace University today accepted Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg’s Challenge for reducing its emissions of greenhouse gasses by 30 percent in the next ten years. At the same time, the University, which is widely recognized for its environmental activities, announced that it has joined the Climate Initiative of former President Bill Clinton, and that it is launching the nation’s first climate change track in a Masters of Environmental Law curriculum.

“As a university known as a national leader in environmental research, policy advocacy and environmental law, we at Pace are committed to being a 2030 Challenge Partner,” said Pace president Stephen J. Friedman. “We thank Mayor Bloomberg for giving us the opportunity to participate in this aggressive plan for reducing carbon emissions, providing us concrete goals on which to focus existing sustainability initiatives.”

Pace’s Challenge commitment spans all campuses of the university, including its New York City campuses downtown and in midtown as well as those in Westchester – White Plains, Pleasantville and Briarcliff.

Friedman added: “Institutions of higher education have a responsibility to lead on challenging issues like climate change.”

Clinton Initiative. Pace’s environmental activity will be further enhanced through its participation in the Clinton Climate Initiative (CCI). This program helps implement large scale energy saving building retrofits, in part through relationships with private sector energy service companies, manufacturers, and financial institutions. CCI projects help lower project costs while lowering energy bills and achieving greenhouse gas reductions, and without using capital budgets or increasing operating expenses. CCI leverages the buying potential of organizations to achieve favorable pricing on energy-efficient and clean energy products and technologies.

Climate change law degree. The announcement of the nation’s first Masters of Environmental Law (LLM) with a concentrated track focused on climate change law came from the Pace Law School, in White Plains, which will launch the new track in the spring semester of 2009. For many years, the school’s environmental law program has been consistently ranked among the nation’s top three. The new concentration will provide students the opportunity to focus their studies on cutting-edge climate topics, including eco-markets and trading, climate and insurance, disaster management, and coastal adaptive management. The climate change concentration complements innovative work being done at the Law School’s Energy & Climate Center, formerly the Pace Energy Project. The Center has a 21-year history of training sustainable energy advocates and is known for expertise in the social and environmental costs and benefits of electricity and fuel production alternatives, including their impact on climate change. As a member of New York City’s Energy Policy Task Force, the Center will be actively working with municipal officials to tackle the Mayor’s Challenge.

Accelerated deadline. The Bloomberg challenge commitment to reductions by the year 2018 is 12 years more aggressive than the goal of New York City’s “PlaNYC,” a set of recommendations announced in April 2007. That document calls for reducing citywide greenhouse gas emissions 30 percent by 2030.

“We are indeed excited to participate in the Mayoral Challenge,” said William McGrath, Senior Vice President for Administration at Pace. “We look forward to sharing project ideas and energy management best practices with our colleagues at other universities and institutions through the seminars and programs.”

Pace will begin addressing the goals in the Challenge by taking an inventory of greenhouse gas emissions and then will implement additional projects to improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions. These projects will complement existing initiatives that have come about in part due to a longstanding consciousness of environmental issues and the efforts of a university-wide sustainability committee that has been at work since August.

Recent greening. In the last few years, Pace has concentrated efforts to improve sustainable practices in areas like energy efficiency, water conservation, recycling and reducing waste. A few of them include:

• Replacing 10,000 light bulbs and 600 ballasts in 2007. As a result, Pace uses a third less energy for lighting these areas.

• Piloted SOMS Technologies’ LLC microGreen™ filters on Pace’s fleet vans. The filters have been shown to keep oil cleaner, extending its life by 21,000 miles and saving Pace (and the environment) 650 gallons of oil in a 12 to 18 month period.

• A recent commitment by Pace Law School to become the second school to participate in the “Law Office Climate Challenge,” an initiative created by the American Bar Association’s Section of Environment, Energy & Resources and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to promote environmental sustainability.

• A student-run vegetable community garden at the Law School.

Pace spearheaded and continues to serve as host institution for the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities, now comprising 50 institutions. For more on Pace’s sustainability initiatives, visit www.pace.edu/sustainability.

“These are exciting and challenging times,” said McGrath. “We see the Mayoral Challenge as a catalyst for our participation in other programs to help secure a sustainable environment for future generations.”

Professional education. For 102 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality professional education resting on a firm base of liberal learning, amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling more than 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Experts to Discuss Environmental Implications of Nuclear Energy at Pace Law School Oct 24

On Friday, October 24, a special day-long Pace Law School Environmental Law Review Colloquium, “40 Years and Counting: Re-licensing the First Generation of Nuclear Power Plants,” will assemble national experts to consider the environmental and legal issues related to the early plants. One focus will be on the relicensing applications pending with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and what decisions on them mean to the building of future plants.

Contact: Jennifer Riekert, (914) 422-4128, jriekert@law.pace.edu FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Nuclear Power – Should Licenses be Renewed on 40-year-old Power Plants?

Experts Will Discuss Environmental Implications of Nuclear Energy at October 24 Pace Environmental Law Colloquium

WHITE PLAINS, NY – Both U.S. presidential candidates have brought nuclear power back into the spotlight. With its promise of zero-emissions technology, nuclear power seems a viable solution at a time when concern over greenhouse-gas emissions makes alternatives like coal dirty words. So why are nuclear power plants receiving such opposition?

According to a recent Harris Poll, only 49% of Americans support building more nuclear power plants, with safety and nuclear waste disposal the top concerns.

On Friday, October 24, a special day-long Pace Law School Environmental Law Review Colloquium, “40 Years and Counting: Relicensing the First Generation of Nuclear Power Plants,” will assemble national experts to consider the environmental and legal issues related to the early plants. One focus will be on the relicensing applications pending with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and what decisions on them mean to the building of future plants.

The colloquium will be held Friday, October 24, from 8:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. in the Robert B. Fleming Moot Courtroom at Pace Law School, 78 North Broadway in White Plains. The event is free and open to the public. Media admission by press pass. Registration is required. Contact Abigail Jones at (914) 422-4116 or ajones2@law.pace.edu to register.

Participants: Anthony Z. Roisman Esq., keynote speaker. Managing partner of the National Legal Scholars Law Firm, P.C., he has been involved in the litigation of environmental, radiation, and toxic tort issues before the state and federal courts and agencies since 1969. He has been lead counsel or co-lead counsel in several landmark environmental cases and has extensive experience in litigating claims for injury from exposure to toxic substances.

Roisman will speak at 3:45 p.m. on October 24. He will discuss the regulatory framework for relicensing nuclear power plants, plant aging management issues, general design issues, site criteria, NEPA requirements, safety and evacuation planning, accident liability and insurance, spent fuel issues, decommissioning, community participation in the relicensing process, and judicial challenges to the relicensing process.

Panel presentations will take place at 9:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. and will include:

Tamar J. Cerafici, Esq., of Counsel, Ballard, Spahr, Andrews & Ingersoll, a leading expert in the “nuclear renaissance” since 2001. She is one of a handful of lawyers who has run the gamut of new nuclear reactor licensing in the United States. In addition to her nuclear experience, she has taught and practiced environmental law for nearly 20 years.

Brendan K. Collins, Esq., also of Ballard, Spahr, Andrews & Ingersoll, a partner in the Litigation Department and is a member of the firm’s Environmental and Climate Change Groups. Collins has represented electric power producers in connection with tritium contamination and cooling water discharges. He has been recognized for his knowledge of and work in environmental law, particularly toxic tort and permitting litigation.

Diane Curran, Esq., a partner at Harmon, Curran, Spielberg, & Eisenberg, LLP, is a nationally recognized expert on nuclear safety and security regulation. She represents citizen groups, state and local governments, and individuals in nuclear facility licensing and enforcement cases before the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and in judicial appeals to the federal court system. She currently represents Riverkeeper, Inc., in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s license renewal proceeding for the Indian Point nuclear power plant.

Maureen T. Koetz, Esq., a partner at Koetz and Duncan LLC, a private consulting firm specializing in strategic asset sustainment, global energy/environmental policy, and related communications in public and private sector enterprise. An expert in global sustainability practices, climate change, and environmental finance, Koetz has negotiated portions of the Kyoto Protocol, participated in regulatory negotiations for credit trading and environmental equity programs in both the U.S. and the E.U., and pioneered the development of sustainable operating platforms for the millions of acres of military installations used jointly by the military services.

Phillip Musegaas, Esq., the policy director and a staff attorney at Riverkeeper, Inc., joined Riverkeeper as a policy analyst and staff attorney following graduation from Pace Law School, where he worked as a legal intern in the Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic on cases involving the Clean Water Act and the Atomic Energy Act. He is currently lead counsel for Riverkeeper’s legal challenge to the relicensing of the Indian Point nuclear power plant, located on the Hudson River, 25 miles north of New York City.

Jamie Van Nostrand, executive director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center, has been an expert in environmental and natural resources law for more than two decades. In his 22-year career in private practice, Van Nostrand represented energy clients in state regulatory proceedings in eight western states, as well as proceedings before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. His practice emphasized electricity and gas regulation, utility mergers and acquisitions, telecommunications, and administrative law.

Richard Webster, Esq., is currently the legal director of the Eastern Environmental Law Center (EELC), New Jersey’s only public interest environmental law firm. Through the EELC, he represents citizens’ groups in matters including the review in the Second Circuit of a decision by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to limit review of safety issues before relicensing of nuclear power plants, and the relicensing proceeding for the Oyster Creek nuclear power plant.

Founded in 1976, Pace University School of Law has nearly 6,500 alumni throughout the country and the world and is consistently ranked among the nation’s top three programs in environmental law. It offers full- and part-time day and evening JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus and offers the Master of Laws degree in Environmental Law, Real Estate Law and Comparative Legal Studies, and a Doctor of Laws in environmental law. The School of Law is part of Pace University, a comprehensive, independent, and diversified university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu

Pace University Leases Space in New and Innovative New York City Residence Hall

Pace University is adding a residence hall on the Upper East Side of Manhattan to accommodate 175 students this fall. “1760 Third Avenue,” as the residence is called, is more than just a “dorm” thanks to creative renovations, environmentally friendly installations and technological innovations included in a major make-over completed by the lessor, Educational Housing Services (EHS), Inc.

Media contact: Bill Caldwell, Pace, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu Faye Bean, EHS, 212-977-9099 x 320, fbean@studenthousing.org

NOTE: Photos of room interiors are at http://www.studenthousing.org/residence/1760-3rd-avenue-residence

Pace University student residents may be available for interviews.

PACE UNIVERSITY LEASES SPACE IN NEW AND INNOVATIVE NEW YORK CITY STUDENT RESIDENCE HALL

Uptown High Rise to House Pace Upperclass, Graduate and Transfer Students

NEW YORK, NY, September 24, 2008 – Pace University is adding a residence hall on the Upper East Side of Manhattan to accommodate 175 students this fall. “1760 Third Avenue,” as the residence is called, is more than just a “dorm” thanks to creative renovations, environmentally friendly installations and technological innovations included in a major make-over completed by the lessor, Educational Housing Services (EHS), Inc.

Pace upperclass, graduate students, and transfer students will be among more than 1,000 student residents from several major New York City institutions of higher education who will live in the EHS 1760 Third Avenue residence. EHS says the 19-story high rise sets a new standard for contemporary college students living in New York City. In the past year, full time undergraduate enrollment at Pace’s New York City campus increased 5 per cent and the demand for Pace student housing in New York City increased 10 per cent, making it necessary to expand the University’s student accommodations.

“The coolest place to live and learn,” 1760 Third Avenue is the newest Educational Housing Services residence and offers students the latest in state-of-the art, “green” living.

Low flow toilets, environmentally friendly flooring and furniture are part of the building’s eco-friendly lifestyle. Amenities such as designer furnishings, flat-screen TV/DVD players, cable TV, high-speed Internet, air conditioning, private baths and refrigerators and microwaves in every room, a 3,500 square-foot fitness facility, laundry facilities that text students when their clothes are ready, a game room, comfortable student lounges, and a multi-media room, are all part of the 1760 Third Avenue experience. As with all EHS residences, the building is fully-staffed and provides 24-hour on-site security.

The residence is convenient to mass transit, retail, and is just minutes from Museum Mile, Central Park, and the East River Esplanade. Pace students are provided with a monthly MetroCard for travel on MTA subways, buses, and trains. Accommodations in the building this fall average about $7,100 per student for the semester. Under its agreement with EHS, Pace is leasing the 1760 Third Avenue residence for nine months.

“We’re delighted that Pace, a long-time EHS student housing partner, is joining us in our newest and most desirable student residence, 1760 Third Avenue,” said EHS president, George Scott. “The building provides an aesthetically rich and environmentally thoughtful environment with all the most sought-after amenities that Pace students are sure to love.”

About Pace University. For 102 years Pace University has provided high quality professional education resting on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling more than 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

About Educational Housing Services (EHS). Educational Housing Services, a not for profit organization founded in 1987, is New York City’s leading provider of safe, affordable, privatized housing for students. EHS currently provides over 3,500 beds in nine locations in Manhattan and Brooklyn. The residences provide first-class amenities including 24-hour security, designer furnishings and free high-speed internet access as well as in-house activities and events. Residents represent virtually every academic institution in New York City as well as institutions outside the NYC area. www.studenthousing.org.

Brazilian Governor to Speak about Climate Change and Sustainable Development, April 30 at Pace Law

Marcelo De Carvalho Miranda, Governor of Tocantins, Brazil, will speak about “Climate Change and Sustainable Development Politics” on Wednesday, April 30, at 11:00 a.m. in Classroom 101 on the Pace Law School campus, 78 North Broadway, White Plains, NY.

MEDIA ALERT

Contact: Jennifer Riekert
(914) 422-4128, jriekert@law.pace.edu

Cara Halstead Cea
(914) 906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu

Release: Immediate

Brazilian Governor to Speak about “Climate Change and Sustainable Development Politics” on April 30 at Pace Law School

WHITE PLAINS, NY (April 28, 2008) – Marcelo De Carvalho Miranda, Governor of Tocantins, Brazil, will speak about “Climate Change and Sustainable Development Politics” on Wednesday, April 30, at 11:00 a.m. in Classroom 101 on the Pace Law School campus, 78 North Broadway, White Plains, NY.

WHO: Marcelo De Carvalho Miranda, Governor of the Brazilian State of Tocantins

WHAT: Environmental Lecture: “Climate Change and Sustainable Development Politics”

WHEN: Wednesday, April 30 at 11:00 a.m.

WHERE: Classroom 101, Pace Law School, 78 North Broadway, White Plains, NY.

Governor Marcelo De Carvalho Miranda is coming to Pace Law School while he is in New York on a special mission to participate in “Brazil: 27 Countries, 01 Nation.” He will be joined by a partner from Menezes e Lopes Advogados, the Brazilian law firm that worked with Pace Law School to produce a report for a biofuels conference last summer.

Founded in 1976, Pace University School of Law has nearly 6,500 alumni throughout the country and the world. It offers full- and part-time day and evening JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus. The School also offers the Master of Laws in Environmental Law, Real Estate Law and in Comparative Legal Studies and an SJD in environmental law. The School of Law is part of a comprehensive, independent, and diversified University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu.