NEWS RELEASE: Pace University Hosts Regional Finals of Competition in Knowledge of Chinese Language and Culture for Prizes of Trips to Beijing

On Saturday, April 23, from 10:00AM to 4:00PM in the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts at Pace University’s downtown Manhattan campus, approximately 25 non-Chinese contestants will try to impress Chinese judges with knowledge of the world’s most-spoken language and its culture.

2nd Annual Chinese Bridge East USA Proficiency Competition for Foreign College Students; Celebrating Chinese Culture and Language Education

Saturday, April 23, 2011, 10 AM-4 PM, Pace University Schimmel Center for the Arts, 1 Pace Plaza, New York, NY

Media Contact:

Cara Cea, Pace Public Information, 914-773-3312, cell 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

NEW YORK, NY, April 21, 2011 – On Saturday, April 23, from 10:00AM to 4:00PM in the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts at Pace University’s downtown Manhattan campus, approximately 25 non-Chinese contestants will try to impress Chinese judges with knowledge of the world’s most-spoken language and its culture.

They will give speeches in Chinese, perform Chinese songs and dances, demonstrate paper cuts, calligraphy, and martial arts, and answer questions China – past and present.

The winners will get a chance to compete against contestants from around the world in a final round this summer in Beijing, all expenses paid, where they could win scholarships to study in China for a semester.

The event is free and open to the public. The auditorium is located at 3 Spruce Street, just east of City Hall. Please contact alurio@pace.edu or call 212-346-1686 for free tickets.

Media admission by press pass.

The competition is the 10th annual “Chinese Bridge,” officially known as the Greater New York Chinese Proficiency Competition for Foreign College Students. It is hosted by the Confucius Institute at Pace University and sponsored by Hanban, the nonprofit organization organized by the Chinese government to spread knowledge of Chinese language and culture around the world.

Saturday’s competitors have risen to the top of an original field of approximately 85 contestants from preliminary rounds held earlier this month at New York University and Ohio State. The initial entrants came from over 13 countries including the US, England, Germany, Spain, Korea and Japan. They are studying at 32 universities ranging from Penn State and Princeton to the University of Akron and SUNY Binghamton.

Roughly a third of the regional finalists will be chosen for the final round.

Opened in 2009, the Confucius Institute at Pace University is the first university-based Confucius Institute in New York City and one of 60 in the US and nearly 300 around the world created by China to spread knowledge of Chinese language and culture.

Confucius Open House
April 29, 2011, 12:00-4:00PM, Student Union, 1 Pace Plaza, NYC Campus

Including tours of the Confucius Institute, a hands-on demonstration of calligraphy with world renowned expert Dr. Bin Zhou, a full breathing and body Qi Gong workout with master Xueming Bao, a presentation about our Chinese Classes, refreshments, and more.

About the Pace Confucius Institute

The competitions are among the first events arranged by the Confucius Institute at Pace. It expects to inaugurate Chinese language classes for both students and professional groups; encourage interdisciplinary scholarship on China through collaborate research, conferences and public lectures; develop innovative teaching and learning techniques and institutional exchanges, integrate study of China into Pace University’s liberal arts and professional curricula, and sponsor seminars for professionals in business, education, film and theater.

Its budget is contributed in equal shares by Pace, Hanban, and the Phoenix Publishing and Media Group, one of China’s largest media conglomerates. PPMG has sent executives to Pace’s graduate publishing program since 2007.

About Pace University

For 105 years Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

NEWS RELEASE: China’s Oprah? Bestselling adapter of Confucius for stressed-out moderns to speak at Pace University Wednesday, Oct. 20

On Wednesday, October 20, Yu, the woman whose “Confucius from the Heart: Ancient Wisdom for Today’s World” has become a worldwide phenomenon, will speak on Confucius in downtown Manhattan at 6:30 PM, at the student union of Pace University’s campus just east of City Hall (corner of Spruce St. and Park Row). Her talk is free and open to the public. A day later, a second celebrated Chinese scholar, the expert on Chinese literature and art Liu Mengxi, will speak at Columbia Teachers College, exploring the distinct patterns of modernization in Europe, the US, and China. His talk, also free and open to the public, is at the Zankel Building, Room 125, 525 West 120th Street, on Thursday, October 21 at 6:30 pm.

Liu Mengxi

Scholar of Chinese literature and art to speak on European, US, Chinese modernization at Columbia Teachers College Thursday, Oct. 21

Both events, co sponsored with China Institute, signal increasing activity by Pace University’s recently-established Confucius Institute

NEW YORK, NY, October 12, 2010 — If Oprah Winfrey gave self-help lectures adapted from the U.S. Constitution and made them a book, could she sell 11 million copies around the world in four years?

That’s just what the Chinese TV personality and professor Yu Dan recently did with the wisdom of Confucius, whose ideas underpinned Chinese government and culture for thousands of years but were rejected by the country’s modern revolution.

On Wednesday, October 20, Yu, the woman whose “Confucius from the Heart: Ancient Wisdom for Today’s World” has become a worldwide phenomenon,  will speak on Confucius in downtown Manhattan at 6:30 PM, at the student union of Pace University’s campus just east of City Hall (corner of Spruce St. and Park Row). Her talk is free and open to the public.

A day later, a second celebrated Chinese scholar, the expert on Chinese literature and art Liu Mengxi, will speak at Columbia Teachers College, exploring the distinct patterns of modernization in Europe, the US, and China. His talk, also free and open to the public, is at the Zankel Building, Room 125, 525 West 120th Street, on Thursday, October 21 at 6:30 pm.

The two events are co-sponsored by Pace’s Confucius Institute, which this fall has begun teaching Chinese language and culture to Pace students, Wall Streeters, and others, and by the city’s China Institute.

Advance reservations for both can be made at ccampbell@pace.edu or 212-346-1880. Media are welcome at both; admission by press pass.

Inspiration and self-help

In 2006, Yu, a mediagenic professor of communications who is vice dean of Beijing Normal University, got time on nationwide TV in China during a national holiday period for a series of lectures about Confucius, based on his famous “Analects.”

In an inspirational self-help mode, Yu adapted Confucius for stressed-out moderns, weaving his 2,500-year-old sayings together with her own experiences.

The lectures made her a household name and soon became a book that turned into one of China’s all-time best sellers. It beat out the country’s other top seller, the Harry Potter series, according to a Los Angeles Times report. Sales hit five million legally and according to the New York Times reached six million more in pirated editions.”Confucius from the Heart” now has been translated into more than 25 languages. (It was published in the US in 2009 by Atria Books, a division of Simon and Schuster.)

Yu and Liu will be in New York after participating in the Second U.S. – China Cultural Forum at the University of California-Berkeley October 15 and 16. The forum is co-sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities, and Berkeley’s Center for Chinese Studies.

A third way to modernize?

Liu directs the Institute of Chinese Culture of the Chinese National Academy of Arts, where he also is a research fellow. He has compiled 35 volumes of classic works in Chinese culture and is founder and chief editor of the magazine Chinese Culture.

His October 21 talk will outline national modernization patterns, first of Europe and then of the U.S., and explore whether China is pursuing a third way. His lecture is titled “Agree to Disagree: On Chinese and American Cultural Modes.”

Liu’s presentation will be preceded by seven musicians from Nanjing Normal University performing such classic Chinese music as “Moon’s Reflection on the Second Spring,” “Purple Bamboo Tune,” and “The Scent of Jasmine Flower.”

50 Chinese phrases for business travel

The Pace Confucius Institute this fall inaugurated Chinese language classes for students and professional groups, starting with an early-morning (7:30 AM), month-long set of hour-long classes on 50 of the most useful phrases for business travel in China, and a one-month series of one-hour lunchtime classes in basic conversation.

The Institute also is offering custom courses conducted off campus at businesses and institutions, which one witty consumer of New York City’s ubiquitous Chinese “take out” food has called “Chinese take-in.”

Founded in 2009, the Pace Institute is the only Confucius institute in the New York metropolitan area associated with a University. Its seal is below, a traditional-style stamp saying “Confucius Institute Pace University” in “small-seal” script. It was created for the Institute by Beijing calligrapher Quiming Sun.

About Pace University

For 103 years, Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter | Flickr | YouTube. Follow Pace students on Twitter:  NYC | PLV

Contacts

Christopher Cory, media relations, Pace University, 212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

Weihua Niu, PhD, Director, Pace University Confucius Institute, 212-346-1815, wniu@pace.edu

Pace University to Establish New York City’s Only University-Based Confucius Institute

On Tuesday, May 5, Pace University will establish the first university-based Confucius Institute in New York City. On Pace’s downtown Manhattan campus, the Institute will begin activities with a day-long public symposium on contemporary Confucianism and global education. The Institute will serve both Pace’s New York City and Westchester campuses and their communities.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contacts Chris Cory, Pace University, 212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu Cao Ding, Confucius Institute Headquarters, Hanban, Beijing, China Tel. from US: 010-5859-5940, caodinghanban@gmail.com

PHOTO EDITORS: We can supply digital photos of the ribbon-cutting, the symposium, and a Chinese seal image.

Pace University to establish New York City’s only university-based Confucius Institute

One of two new institutes in New York State that will be inaugurated May 3 and 5 as part of rapid worldwide growth

“Confucianism and global education” to be explored at day-long public symposium May 5

New York, NY, April 28, 2009 – On Tuesday, May 5, Pace University will establish the first university-based Confucius Institute in New York City. On Pace’s downtown Manhattan campus, the Institute will begin activities with a day-long public symposium on contemporary Confucianism and global education. The Institute will serve both Pace’s New York City and Westchester campuses and their communities.

The announcement was made by Geoffrey L. Brackett, the University’s provost. “We are proud to launch the Confucius Institute at Pace University, which will draw on Pace’s pedagogical, scholarly and professional expertise as a unique educational enterprise centering on Chinese culture and the world’s most-spoken language,” Brackett said.

“This has been a highly-collaborative and energizing endeavor, driven by our excellent faculty and guided by the Dean of Dyson College, Nira Herrmann,” he added. “It is unique in its interdisciplinary focus and involves both undergraduate and graduate programs. It will be a great additional resource for our students, faculty, the whole Pace community and the metropolitan region.”

Growth at Alfred and Stony Brook; upcoming Chicago conference. The unveiling of a plaque and the symposium at Pace are part of a three-day sequence in New York State – and elsewhere — that betokens a rapid world-wide expansion of Confucius Institutes (CIs).

A new Institute will be formally inaugurated at Alfred University in Alfred, NY, on May 3. An Institute at the State University of New York at Stony Brook opened April 13.

A conference of faculty members and administrators from CIs in the US, Canada and Mexico takes place at the Mariott Miracle Mile hotel in Chicago May 1 and 2.

The Pace institute http://www.pace.edu/pace/confucius/ will bring the number of such Institutes to four in New York State and to 58 in the US, according to Hanban (“Office of Chinese Language”), China’s non-governmental organization for teaching Chinese as a foreign language. (The city’s first CI opened three years ago at the China Institute on East 65th Street.)

Hanban says it is aiming for 500 Confucius Institutes around the world by 2010.

The institutes’ growth reflects both encouragement by China and increased global interest in the country, symbolized by US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s decision to make China a destination of her first trip abroad.

Commercial publishing partner. The Pace institute is believed to be the only one with a commercial partner. Phoenix Publishing and Media Group (PPMG), one of China’s largest media conglomerates, is joining Pace and Hanban in contributing equal shares of the first year budget of $300,000.

PPMG has sent executives to Pace’s graduate publishing program since 2007. It and Pace will use the institute as a pedagogical laboratory for developing PPMG’s Chinese-language textbooks for foreigners.

Both PPMG and Hanban are donating Chinese reference books, textbooks and software. Hanban also is arranging for two visiting teachers of Chinese from a Chinese university.

“Our partnership with PPMG and Hanban is unique — no other Confucius Institute has such an arrangement,” according to Provost Brackett. “This is an outgrowth of our superior MS in Publishing program, which has deep collaborative ties with China and a significant presence there. It indicates the strength of Pace’s ability to educate for the professions in the international arena.”

In addition to being the only US institute with a business partner and the first university-based institute in New York City, the Pace institute is the only one of the three new New York institutes to be inaugurated with a scholarly symposium. Pace officials also think it may be unusual in its integration with an East Asian Studies program, several of whose professors are on the institute’s faculty.

Participants and schedule. On March 5 media are invited to an invitation-only ceremony unveiling a plaque, at 10:00 AM in Pace’s building at 41 Park Row, just east of City Hall Park. Public ceremonies start at 10:30 in Pace’s main building next door at 1 Pace Plaza, in the Multipurpose Room. The symposium begins at 11:30.

Participating will be Pace’s president, Stephen J. Friedman; Brackett; the dean of Pace’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Nira Herrmann; and officials from PPMG and the Chinese consulate in New York. Also present will be the Pace institute’s director, Weihua Niu, a professor of psychology, and Joseph Lee and Ronald Frank, the professors who co-direct the University’s East Asian Studies program.

“Why a Confucius Institute?” The symposium will be lead by notable experts.

• 11:30 AM: “Why a Confucius Institute?” by Wm. Theodore de Bary, Columbia University’s John Mitchell Mason Professor and a former provost, a renowned Confucian specialist. His most recent book on religious and intellectual traditions of East Asia is Nobility and Civility: Asian Ideals of Leadership and the Common Good.

• 1:15 PM: “Images of Confucius, Past and Present,” by Deborah Sommer, chair of the religion department at Gettysburg College, a specialist in Chinese religions and intellectual history. (Confucius’s 2,560th birthday is August 28.)

• 3:00 PM: Panel on cross-cultural teaching and learning moderated by Xiaolei Wang, professor of psychology at Pace and author of the recently-published “Mother Tongue, Father Tongue, Country Tongue: Growing up with Three Languages.” Presentations on “Understanding and Improving Students’ Learning: A Dialogue between Confucian and Socratic Approaches” by Jinfa Cai, of the department of mathematics education at the University of Delaware, and on “Culture, Brain and Learning: Recent Evidence from Imaging Research,” by Chuansheng Chen, a psychologist at the University of California at Irvine.

• 3:00 PM: “Chinese students in the 19th century United States” and their present-day legacies. by Edward Rhoads, an emeritus professor of history at the University of Texas at Austin.

An invitation-only final banquet will present performances by China Theater Works of an excerpt from a Chinese opera, and by majors in Pace’s fast-growing Musical Theater program of excerpts from Western musicals.

Travel and summer programs. The Pace institute also plans to promote:

• Education for professional groups;

• Interdisciplinary scholarship on China through collaborative research, conferences, seminars, and public lectures;

• Innovative teaching and learning techniques, international travel experiences, summer programs, and institutional exchanges; and integration of the study of China into the University’s liberal arts and professional curricula.

Its first classes, this summer, will provide a Chinese Studies track for the high school students who come to Pace’s Summer Scholars program for a two-week immersion in college courses and New York City life. In the future, the Institute plans seminars for professionals in business, education, probably film and theater, and public film festivals.

Pace and China. Approximately 275 Chinese international students and China-born US citizens attend Pace; alumni in China now number more than 50. Chinese language courses and exchanges of professors and students with China go back to the early 1980’s.

The University has at least 13 other agreements and affiliations with Chinese institutions. Students visit China regularly in field-study courses, and Pace professors, 25 of whom have scholarly or professional experience in China, collaborate with Chinese colleagues on research and training projects in areas from clean energy to trade law, nursing, accounting, and attitudes toward the elderly.

For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu