Pace Ranked one of the Five Safest Colleges and Universities in New York City

Pace is one of the five safest colleges and Universities in New York City, according to a survey by the Daily Beast website that was covered in the New York Daily News.

Pace is one of the five safest colleges and universities in New York City, according to a survey by the Daily Beast website that was covered in the New York Daily News and the World Journal and on NY1 and WNBC TV.

Find the criteria and the Daily Beast article here:

http://www.thedailybeast.com/blogs-and-stories/2010-09-14/50-safest-colleges/?cid=topic:featured2

Read about Pace’s ranking in this New York Daily News article.

http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/2010/09/16/2010-09-16_5_campuses_in_city_among_safest_in_us.html

Caputo Selected as Leader in Combating Student Substance Abuse

As alcohol, other drug abuse, and incidents of violence continue to plague college and university campuses, a new group of leaders has joined the Presidents Leadership Group of the Center for College Health and Safety (CCHS), a seven-year-old abuse-prevention institution funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACTS
Helen Stubbs, Center for College Health and Safety,
617-618-2366, hstubbs@edc.org
or
Christopher T. Cory, Director of Public Information, Pace University
212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT DAVID A. CAPUTO SELECTED TO SERVE AS NATIONAL LEADER
IN COMBATING STUDENT SUBSTANCE ABUSE

Newton, Mass. and New York, NY, August 26, 2004 — As alcohol, other drug abuse, and incidents of violence continue to plague college and university campuses, a new group of leaders has joined the Presidents Leadership Group of the Center for College Health and Safety (CCHS), a seven-year-old abuse-prevention institution funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Pace University President David A. Caputo is one of six new members announced today, all of whom are committed to making student substance abuse prevention a priority on their campuses. Caputo’s addition brings the presidential group to a total involving 50 campuses in 28 states.

The expansion of the PLG marks the continued CCHS commitment to highlighting and promoting the critical role of presidential leadership in collegiate alcohol and other drug prevention.

New PLG members are chosen based on their previous leadership efforts and plans for future initiatives. Applicants must submit personal statements and letters of support from individuals in their institutions and surrounding communities demonstrating their clear commitment to this issue and their readiness to continue serving as leaders.

As President, Caputo has worked with local law enforcement organizations, sponsored and participated in a wellness program, and appointed a new campus-wide taskforce charged with developing a comprehensive action plan that deals with prevention, education, and treatment. He said, “By joining the Presidents Leadership Group, I look forward to becoming even more involved in the effort to foster student health.”

Caputo joined a group of six new members:

Institution President State
Humboldt State University Rollin Richmond CA
Pace University David A. Caputo NY
Sul Ross State University R. Vic Morgan TX
SUNY Cortland Erik J. Bitterbaum NY
The University of Vermont Daniel Mark Fogel VT
University of New Hampshire Ann Weaver Hart NH

“Presidents are in a unique position to create a positive impact on their campus and community environments regarding issues of student alcohol and other drug use,” stated William DeJong, director of the Center for College Health and Safety. “The Presidents Leadership Group has proven to be an effective vehicle to promote the positive efforts of college and university presidents to address these issues.”

The following presidents and chancellors were previously named to the PLG:

Institution President/Chancellor State
Alvernia College Laurence W. Mazzeno PA
Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania Jessica Kozloff PA
California State University, Bakersfield Tomas A. Arciniega (retired) CA
California State University, Fresno John Welty CA
California State University System Charles B. Reed CA
Central Washington University Jerilyn McIntyre WA
Clarkson College J. W. Upright NE
Coker College B. James Dawson SC
College of Santa Fe Linda Hanson NM
Edgewood College James Ebben WI
Frederick Community College Patricia Stanley MD
Illinois College Axel Steuer IL
Lehigh University Gregory Farrington PA
Miami-Dade Community College, MCC Kathie S. Sigler (retired) FL
North Idaho College Michael Burke ID
Northwest Missouri State University Dean L. Hubbard MO
Prairie View A & M University Charles Hines (retired) TX
Raritan Valley Community College G. Jeremiah Ryan NJ
San Antonio College Robert E. Zeigler TX
San Diego Community College District Augustine Gallego CA
Southeast Missouri State University Kenneth W. Dobbins MO
Southeastern Louisiana University Randy Moffett LA
SUNY, Potsdam John Fallon NY
University at Albany, SUNY Karen Hitchcock (retired) NY
University of Bridgeport Neil Salonen CT
University of California, Santa Barbara Henry Yang CA
University of Delaware David Roselle DE
University of Iowa David J. Skorton IA
University of Kentucky Lee Todd KY
University of Miami Donna Shalala FL
University of Michigan Mary Sue Coleman MI
University of Missouri, Rolla Gary Thomas MO
University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg Frank Cassell PA
University of Puget Sound Susan Pierce (retired) WA
University of Rhode Island Robert Carothers RI
University of San Diego Alice Hayes (retired) CA
University of Virginia John T. Casteen, III VA
University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire Donald J. Mash WI
University of Wyoming William Kirwas MD
Vanderbilt University Gordon Gee TN
Weber State University Paul Thompson (retired) UT
Western Washington University Karen Morse WA

The PLG was formed in 1997. That year, with six members, the PLG published an alcohol prevention report urging college presidents to become active leaders on this issue on their campuses and in their surrounding communities. Copies of the report, Be Vocal, Be Visible, Be Visionary: Recommendations for College and University Presidents on Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention can be obtained by visiting the Center for College Health and Safety’s Web site at www2.edc.org/cchs/plg/products.html.

The Center for College Health and Safety is a part of the Health and Human Development division of Education Development Center, Inc., an internationally known educational research and development organization located in Newton, Mass. CCHS assists colleges and universities in developing, implementing and evaluating prevention policies and programs that address a broad range of health and safety issues at institutions of higher education. The Center also conducts research to expand current knowledge about effective strategies to promote health and prevent alcohol, tobacco, drug use, violence, injuries, and high-risk sexual activity.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university committed to opportunity, teaching and learning based on research, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. It is one of the ten founders of Project Pericles, developing education that encourages lifelong participation in democratic processes. Pace has seven campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. More than 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. Www.pace.edu.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, based in Princeton, N.J., is the nation’s largest philanthropy devoted exclusively to health and health care. It concentrates its grantmaking in four goal areas: to assure that all Americans have access to quality health care at reasonable cost; to improve the quality of care and support for people with chronic health conditions; to promote healthy communities and lifestyles; and to reduce the personal, social and economic harm caused by substance abuse – tobacco, alcohol and illicit drugs.

Additional information is at the CCHS Web site at http://www2.edc.org/cchs/ or available by contacting CCHS via telephone (617-618-2366) or email (cchs@edc.org).