Pace University creates digital art gallery in downtown Manhattan

Pace University is creating a gallery of digital art in downtown Manhattan. Located across from City Hall, just west of the South Street Seaport and just south of TriBeCa, the space will be New York City’s first university gallery dedicated to showing digital art from both inside and outside the campus community.

Contact: Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University
212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

For immediate use
BRIEF BIOGRAPHIES of the gallery directors are attached.
DIGITAL IMAGES from the “Digital Downtown” exhibition are available
on request via e-mail as 300 ppi TIFFs or JPEGs.

Pace University creates digital art gallery in downtown Manhattan

First exhibition to highlight evocative city experiences,
demonstrate range of digital media technologies

New attraction near City Hall

New York, April 16, 2003 — Pace University is creating a gallery of digital art in downtown Manhattan. Located across from City Hall, just west of the South Street Seaport and just south of TriBeCa, the space will be New York City’s first university gallery dedicated to showing digital art from both inside and outside the campus community.

The new Pace Digital Gallery is at 163 William Street between Fulton and Ann Streets. It opens Friday, April 25 with the exhibition, “Digital Downtown.” The show brings together works with Downtown themes that have been created over the last ten years in a range of contemporary technologies ranging from prints and videos to CD-ROMs, DVDs and web pages with which viewers can interact. The space will be open Wednesday through Saturday from 10 to 5 and by appointment.

A reception for “Digital Downtown” will be held April 25th from 6 to 8 pm. Media are invited but must RSVP to Juliet Martin at 212-346-1352 or jmartin@pace.edu. More information is at www.pace.edu/digitalgallery.

“The Pace Digital Gallery is a significant addition to the lively arts we provide to both our students and the city,” said Pace President David A. Caputo. “We want it to promote the educational aspects of art within our ever-growing digital society.”

The gallery adds to the post-9/11 revitalization of downtown Manhattan, in which Pace previously has participated by becoming the permanent home of Tony Randall’s National Actors Theatre and by creating the Center for Downtown New York, which has brought together more than 15 conferences on aspects of rebuilding the neighborhood.

The gallery also reflects a surge of student interest at Pace in digital art (the university recently hired two digital artists as professors). It is part of a “renaissance of new media and digital art now occurring in New York,” in the description of Bruce Wands, the School of Visual Arts professor who directs the annual international exhibition of new-media art known as the New York Digital Salon.

Underlying City Rhythms.

“Digital Downtown” will display evocative work by the artists Alexander Heilner, Russet Lederman, Hidekazu Minami, Annette Weintraub, Robert Wright, Amy Youngs and Jody Zellen. The exhibition is an informal retrospective of the Digital Salon, since the Pace curators have chosen works with a downtown theme from previous Salons.

“Underlying rhythms of the city — crowd movement, dreams of glory, ambient sound and memories of place — recur throughout the exhibition,” according to Jillian McDonald, a digital artist and Pace professor of art who is co-curator of the Pace Digital Gallery.

Her co-curator and fellow art professor, Juliet Martin, added: “The computer can often be seen as a cold and heartless machine. I see one of the prime objectives of this gallery being to expose students and the community to the grace and beauty that can be contained in digital art. We hope this will be accomplished with challenging and provocative exhibits that explore where computer science and art come together.”

The Gallery’s third co-founder is Francis T. Marchese, a professor of computer science at Pace who is founder and director of the University’s Center for Advanced Media (CAM), a part of the School of Computer Science and Information Systems (CSIS). The Pace Digital Gallery is an initiative of CAM, of which Martin and McDonald are members.

Marchese noted that “the convergence of art and programming has created demand for people who combine technical and artistic expertise, even if not all of them make careers in fine art. We want the gallery to be a nexus for the latest ideas in all these fields.”

The “Digital Downtown” exhibition is a component of the New York Digital Salon’s 10th season, which runs from April 22 to May 25 and is centered on a separate exhibition in the World Financial Center’s Courtyard Gallery, 220 Vesey Street. Pace is one of several co-sponsors of the Salon. As part of the Salon, the University is hosting a panel discussion with the artists in its Multipurpose Room on Tuesday, May 6 at 7 p.m. and a presentation of computer animation and digital video in its Schimmel Center for the Arts on Monday, May 12 at 7 p.m. Both are at 1 Pace Plaza, on Park Row across from City Hall.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, N.Y., and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart International Airport in New Windsor, N. Y. More than 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing, and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu

Pace University Digital Gallery

Biographies of Co-Directors
Juliet Martin
Juliet Martin has a BA in Visual Arts from Brown University and a MFA in Computer Art from the School of Visual Arts. She has received recognition for her work in venues including Unknown/Infinity in New York City (sponsored by the Chinese Information & Cultural Center), the European Media Art Festival in Berlin, in the National Innovation Centre in Sydney and SIGGRAPH. She is an assistant professor of computer art at Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences.

She is also a digital artist, programmer, video artist and writer. Since being exposed to the computer as an art medium, her work has embraced the collaboration, conversation, and cooperation inherent in digitally based projects. Her work primarily addresses how internal human relationships have changed due to societal preconceptions. This is currently manifesting itself in the form of a series of projects based around a purple nymph who explores these human issues.

Website:
www.julietmartin.com

Jillian Mcdonald
Jillian Mcdonald is a Canadian performance and media artist transplanted in New York. Her web projects include Things are Okay and Home Like No Place which have been produced in residency at Trinity Square Video in Toronto and La Chambre Blanche Gallery in Québec City. These projects have been shown at La Biennale de Montreal, and on Kanonmedia (Vienna), Emmedia (Calgary), Hive projects (Toronto), Rhizome (New York), DIAN (Germany), The Irish Museum of Modern Art’s Net.Art Open, and S@lon (Mexico). Ivy League is part of StudioXX’s Montreal Virtual Garden project; and Advice Lounge was launched with Videographe and Vitamin B at FCMM in Montreal in October. She has recently received a Canada Council for the Arts Grant for Media Arts.

Her videos have been screened recently in VideominutoPopTV in Firenze Italy; Little Sins, at White Box NYC; The Arizona State Gallery Film Festival; Truckfood and Unpacked, two exhibitions about food in NYC moving trucks and meatlockers; Straylight, an online exhibition from Dublin; Video Marathon and Park It! at Art in General in NYC; and American Sandwich at Star 67 Gallery in Brooklyn. Live in Infamy, an animation, was part of Transmedia’2002, a site-specific program for a Toronto LED board this fall.

Mcdonald has an ongoing body of performance work titled In the Public Eye. To date, seven performance projects have been installed in thirteen cities: including Ready to Play, a sidewalk game performance in Ottawa and Queens, NY; Tailor Made, a tailoring performance in Montréal and Toronto; Shampoo, a hair-washing performance for hair salons in Winnipeg and Toronto; Borrowed Objects in New York City and Ottawa; and Houseplant, a houseplant adoption service in New York. Some of her favorite people are strangers.

Mcdonald is an assistant professor of computer art at Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences and is co-curator of No Live Girls, a 60-artist video project for peepbooths at the Lusty Lady in San Francisco, Seattle, and New York.

Website:
www.jillianmcdonald.net
Francis T. Marchese
Francis T. Marchese, Ph.D., is Professor of Computer Science at Pace University’s School of Computer Science and Information Systems, where he teaches courses in computer graphics, data visualization, human-computer interaction and software engineering. He is founder and Director of Pace’s Center for Advanced Media (CAM), the goal of which is to develop computer-oriented, human-centered systems that help people solve problems by transforming the way they experience the world and the way they collaborate within it. Dr. Marchese’s current research focuses on developing collaborative virtual reality and video conferencing systems, and the application of symmetry to user interface design. He has published widely in science, technology, and art; and is editor of the conference proceedings entitled Understanding Images published by Springer-Verlag. Dr. Marchese has been twice awarded Pace’s School of Computer Science and Information Systems’ Excellence in Research Award, received the Kenan Award for Teaching Excellence, and been nominated for the Carnegie Foundation Teacher of the Year Award. He holds a doctorate in quantum chemistry from the University of Cincinnati and was a National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Hunter College of CUNY specializing in the statistical mechanics of biomolecular systems.

Websites:
CAM: csis.pace.edu/~cam
Faculty: csis.pace.edu/~marchese
Digital Gallery: www.pace.edu/DigitalGallery

19th Annual Chinese New Year Extravaganza: Year of the Sheep 4701

The “19th Annual Chinese New Year Extravaganza: Year of the Sheep 4701” will be presented by Pace University’s School of Education, along with A.R.T.S., Inc., Chinese-American Planning Council; Lower East Side/Chinatown AmeriCorps; Pace Education Alliance; Pace Office of Multicultural Affairs; United Chinese Student Association; and Asian Culture/Filipino Society.

January 30, 2003

Contact: Bill Caldwell, Pace University, (212) 346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY

WHAT: “19th Annual Chinese New Year Extravaganza: Year of the Sheep 4701,” presented by Pace University’s School of Education, along with A.R.T.S., Inc., Chinese-American Planning Council; Lower East Side/Chinatown AmeriCorps; Pace Education Alliance; Pace Office of Multicultural Affairs; United Chinese Student Association; and Asian Culture/Filipino Society.

WHO: Ninety local school children from Chinatown in downtown New York will participate in this performance, featuring a Children’s Dance Extravaganza with traditional Chinese dances to celebrate the Year of the Sheep 4701. More than six hundred local school children and educators from New York City schools will come to watch the celebration. A Children’s Art Exhibit will be on display, featuring original artwork inspired by the Year of the Sheep.

WHEN: Children’s Dance Extravaganza will be held on Wednesday, February 5, 12:00 – 1:30 PM. Art exhibit will be on display from February 3 – 7. Gallery hours are Monday, February 3, 10 AM – 5:30 PM; Tuesday, February 4, 10 AM – 5:30 PM; Wednesday, February 5, 10 AM – 4 PM ; Thursday, February 6, 10 AM -5:30 PM; and Friday, February 7, 10 AM -3 PM.

WHERE: Pace University, The Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts Theater (located on Spruce Street between Gold Street and Park Row), One Pace Plaza, New York, NY. Art exhibit will be on display in the Fingesten Gallery at One Pace Plaza.

For more information, contact Margaret Dowling at 212-346-1444 or chinesenewyear@hotmail.com .