NEWS RELEASE: Pace University researchers recognized for development of first new drug for “sleeping sickness” in 30 years

There are no fundraising walks for Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT or “sleeping sickness”) but a drug for this “orphan disease” has gone to clinical trial thanks in part to professor emeritus Cyrus Bacchi, PhD, and Nigel Yarlett, PhD, chair of chemistry and physical sciences in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences at Pace University.

Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative Project of the Year 2011 Award given to Pace professors

NEW YORK, NY, March 12, 2012 – There are no fundraising walks for Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT or “sleeping sickness”) but a drug for this “orphan disease” has gone to clinical trial thanks in part to biology professor emeritus Cyrus Bacchi, PhD, and chemistry professor Nigel Yarlett, PhD, and their undergraduate students in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences at Pace University.

The professors’ work out of Haskins Laboratories at Pace has been awarded the Project of the Year 2011 Award by the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) for their role in the development of the first new drug to go to clinical trial and the first new treatment for sleeping sickness since 1980. The award was given jointly to Scynexis Inc. of Research Triangle Park, NC, which synthesized the compounds, and Pace University which did initial testing in vivo. Several Pace chemistry and biology students assisted in animal testing of the drug, providing them with hands-on experience in drug development from the bench to in vivo studies. Haskins Labs identified 15 compounds that may work in humans.

Bacchi and Yarlett have devoted their careers to neglected diseases. The research of Haskins Labs on compounds to treat sleeping sickness was written about in The New York Times in 1985 and 2008. In one article the disease was called “fearsome but nearly forgotten because its victims are poor and obscure.” In another article one drug, eflornithine, the trademark name for DFMO discovered in 1980 at Pace, is mentioned saying it is a “miracle” the drug is available. The drug is still used as a first line clinical treatment for sleeping sickness.

About 150,000 people contract sleeping sickness each year, but 50 million people in 36 countries live in areas where they are at risk. During recent epidemics in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Angola, and Southern Sudan, prevalence has been as high as 50 percent. In some communities with high prevalence, the death rate from African sleeping sickness has exceeded that of HIV/AIDS. Nevertheless, there is no profit in it. Without outside funding and incentives, drug companies are not interested in developing treatments for such orphan diseases.

 

With funding from DNDi, which receives support from the Gates Foundation, the drug has been able to go to clinical trials.  One quarter of a million dollars a year is going to support this research at Pace.

The researchers have identified a new series of compounds which are effective in curing mice and are now being tested on larger mammals. Phase I clinical toxicity studies are beginning on humans in France on one compound, SCYX7158. Volunteers who are not infected take the drug to see if humans can tolerate it and are monitored closely for side effects. If these studies are successful, this compound will go to Phase II clinical trials later this year in African villages with infected inhabitants who are cut off from most medical access.

“For the people living in these villages, this sort of sickness is just a way of life,” said Yarlett.

“Sleeping sickness” has been called by The New York Times “too benign a nickname” for human African trypanosomiasis, which is caused by a protozoan. The disease is characterized by two distinct stages, early stage or blood stream infection and late stage disease of the central nervous system.  When the brain is affected, victims hallucinate and their behavior becomes erratic and sometimes violent. Victims may chase people with machetes, throw themselves into latrines and scream with pain at the touch of water. Near the end of the disease, they lapse into a state of listlessness followed by coma and death.

The Haskins Laboratories, which have been at Pace since 1970, have a long legacy of researching possible cures for diseases that are out of the public spotlight. “We work on things that aren’t stylish—not in vogue. And consequentially, things that aren’t typically funded to a great extent,” said Yarlett.

“Drugs were developed between 1920 and 1950 to treat sleeping sickness, but some of these drugs had an arsenic base and were toxic,” Yarlett said. “For about 10% of those being treated with these drugs, death occurred more quickly than it would have if they hadn’t been treated. These are the first new drugs developed to treat sleeping sickness in 30 years. We’re very excited.”

Workers at Haskins Labs are also developing a first line of treatment for a more global issue—cryptosporidiosis, a waterborne illness that causes chronic diarrhea. Its major impact has been among those with weakened immune systems, including those who are HIV positive, receiving cancer treatments, or those that have undergone organ transplants.

“Cryptosporidosis is one of the major causes of death in HIV positive people and currently there is nothing available to treat it,” Yarlett said.

Read the press release from DNDi here.

About Haskins Labs

The Haskins Laboratories was founded in 1935 at General Electrical and Union College by four young and innovative scientists, one of whom became its namesake, Caryl Haskins, a physicist and geneticist. In 1970 it split into two divisions, the Microbiology Division, under Seymour Hutner (one of the original scientists) affiliated with Pace University, and the Speech Recognition and Cognition Division affiliated with Yale University. It is funded by a number of sources, including the National Institutes of Health (in collaboration with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas), Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi), and Genzyme Corp and works in collaboration with pharmaceutical companies Scynexis and Anacor.

For more information about the work being done at the Haskins Laboratories, click here.

About Pace University

For 105 years Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact:

Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

NEWS RELEASE: “Pace University and Hitachi America, Ltd. Encourage Educators To Take A Technological “Leap” Forward on February 29, 2012”

On Leap Day 2012, The Helene & Grant Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Pace University and Hitachi America, Ltd. are teaming up to offer a free program to encourage educators to “leap” into the technological future and explore innovations such as the use of avatars in the classroom.

Pace University and Hitachi America, Ltd. Encourage Educators To Take

A Technological “Leap” Forward on February 29, 2012

– -Hosting Free Program on the Role of Technology in Education–

(Tarrytown, NY) February 24, 2012 – Hitachi America, Ltd., a subsidiary of Hitachi, Ltd. (NYSE: HIT/TSE: 6501) located in Tarrytown, NY, and Pace University’s Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship are co-sponsoring a free, full-morning education program for nonprofit and education organizations focused on the role of technology in education and helping students reach their full potential.

This year’s program is entitled “Inspired Education: Learning, Teaching and Technology.” The program will explore the impact of technology on education, how it has altered the way we teach and the way the students learn. The use of avatars in the role of virtual students is just one technological innovation that will be discussed. Pace University is one of only 10 universities nationwide to use the TeachLivE avatar lab technology, which immerses future teachers in a simulated classroom where they practice making real-time decisions in response to the dynamic features of classroom learning.  Similar to the way pilots use simulators to hone their skills, the avatars help future teachers practice managing a classroom and students with various personalities and challenges before being in a live classroom. The forum will also explore how technology has both narrowed and widened the gap between affluent and low income students and how it is being employed to help some students with special needs. Panelists include a professor from Pace who is actively involved in the TeachLivE avatar lab, a curriculum consultant, the administrator for a school that works specifically with dyslexic children and the executive director of an education non-profit organization in Yonkers.

 The program will take place at Pace University’s Graduate Center located in downtown White Plains, NY and will run from 10:00 am – 12:00 pm on Wednesday, February 29, 2012. The campus is located at 1 Martine Avenue. Registration and a light breakfast will begin at 9:00 am and the panel discussion will begin at 10:00 am. Media admission by press pass.

Panelists include:

The program is free, but advance registration is required due to limited seating. Attendance is limited to members of nonprofit organizations. Participants can register online at:

Pace University/Hitachi America, Ltd. Nonprofit Forum Registration

This is the fourth year that Hitachi America, Ltd. has spearheaded this program and the third year that Pace University’s Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship has served as a co-sponsor.

The Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship was created in 2005 to serve the nonprofit community and Pace University. The Center provides scholarly research, academic programs, advisory services and roundtable discussions to encourage excellence and enhance managerial leadership skills of professionals within the nonprofit sector.

“Educational programs that encourage thoughtful exploration of issues surrounding nonprofit effectiveness and efficiency are at the core of our mission at the Wilson Center,” said Rebecca Tekula, PhD, the Center’s Executive Director. “We are proud to once again work with Hitachi America, Ltd. on what promises to be an enlightening discussion for the nonprofit, education and student communities.”

“We are excited to be sponsoring this educational program that will engage participants in a discussion about the role of technology in education,” said Lauren Raguzin, Director of Community Relations for Hitachi America, Ltd. “I am appreciative of our continued partnership with The Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Pace University in putting this program together.”

About Hitachi America

Hitachi America, Ltd., headquartered in Tarrytown, New York, a subsidiary of Hitachi, Ltd., and its subsidiary companies, offers a broad range of electronics, power and industrial equipment and services, automotive products and consumer electronics with operations throughout the Americas. For more information, visit www.hitachi-america.us. For information on other Hitachi Group companies in the United States, please visit www.hitachi.us.

Hitachi, Ltd., (NYSE: HIT / TSE: 6501), headquartered in Tokyo, Japan, is a leading global electronics company with approximately 360,000 employees worldwide. Fiscal 2010 (ended March 31, 2011) consolidated revenues totaled 9,315 billion yen ($112.2 billion). Hitachi will focus more than ever on the Social Innovation Business, which includes information and telecommunication systems, power systems, environmental, industrial and transportation systems, and social and urban systems, as well as the sophisticated materials and key devices that support them. For more information on Hitachi, please visit Hitachi’s website at www.hitachi.com.  

About the Wilson Center
The Helene and Grant Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship is an institute of Pace University aiming to serve students and nonprofit organizations by encouraging more effective and efficient nonprofit management practices through research, colloquia and continuing education programs. The Center was launched with a $5 million gift from Helene and Grant Wilson, entrepreneurs and philanthropists whose involvement with nonprofits has convinced them that entrepreneurial management can help these organizations increase their impact.

About Pace University

For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

Visit us on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter:  NYC | PLV

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Contacts: 
Lauren Raguzin
Hitachi America, Ltd. 
(914)333-2986 
Lauren.Raguzin@hal.hitachi.com

In The Empire: “Pace University’s Entrepreneurship Lab Will Train People To Think Differently”

A startup blog covers the opening of Pace’s new startup Entrepreuneurship Lab. How appropriate.

This is the seed blog for InTheEmpire, a Streetwise Media site specifically for NYC, set to officially launch this March.
 
February 17, 2012
 
 

Pace University officially opened the doors to its Entrepreneurship Lab (aka, E-Lab) last night, and there to cut the ribbon was Professor Bruce Bachenheimer, who was named the lab’s first director.

“It takes innovation and entrepreneurship to develop things that are meaningful,” Bachenheimer tells us over the phone.

The big picture strategy of the E-Lab is not necessarily to incubate companies or create startups, but it’s to spur entrepreneurial and innovative thoughts and actions.

“We don’t measure our metrics by how many students launch businesses,” Bachenheimer says. “It’s the ability to come up with new and creative solutions to problems, and the ability to add value in a unique and innovative way.”

To spur innovation, Bachenheimer and his E-Lab will provide students with workspace for creative thinking, in addition to access to workshops, guest speakers, roundtable discussions, and networking events involving members of the entrepreneurial community.

“If you’re looking at very good innovators, they have to be young enough so that their minds are not so rigid in the way things are and the way things should be,” says Bachenheimer. “But they also need to have enough knowledge, skills, and abilities to find and solve problems.”

To mold a mind into innovative shape, college students need an “experiential education.” People at that young of an age need to be able to expand their horizons and question the norm, or, to borrow a line from Steve Jobs, you need to “stay hungry, stay foolish” to truly innovate.

“You need to train people to think differently, and if there are specific skills they don’t have, let them know how to get those resources,” Bachenheimer says. “Hopefully, the Entrepreneurship Lab is one of them.”

(Image, from left: Neil Braun, Bruce Bachenheimer, Harold Levy)

Crain’s New York Business: “Pace University launches entrepreneur lab”

Following the lead of schools like New York University and Columbia University, a group at Pace University has created a space for the school’s budding entrepreneurs to call home.

Downtown business school creates a space to foster entrepreneurialism among its students

By Emily Laermer
February 15, 2012
 
Following the lead of schools like New York University and Columbia University, a group at Pace University has created a space for the school’s budding entrepreneurs to call home. 
 
The lab, located on the third floor of 163 William St., will open Thursday. It was the brainchild of Neil Braun, the dean of the university’s Lubin School of Business. However, it will be available for use by all Pace students, not just those from the business school, he said. 
 
“It’s about more than starting companies. Entrepreneurship, to me, is a mindset, a way of thinking and interdisciplinary doing,” said Mr. Braun, adding that the lab will be open to students in all of Pace’s specialized schools, which include programs for computer sciences, business, education and health professions, as well as an arts and science program.
 
Before becoming dean of Lubin 18 months ago, Mr. Braun was the president of NBC Television Network and CEO and chairman of Viacom Entertainment.
 
Mr. Braun would not disclose the financials of the lab, but he noted that funding will come from the university. He said the university “reallocated funds that were used for other things that outlived their utility,” adding that he expects future successes from the lab will justify the cost.
 
The lab will include space for students to conference with investors, a studio for them to work and a large meeting room for speakers. Bruce Bachenheimer, the director of the lab and a professor at Lubin, says he plans to reach out to some of the thousand-plus Pace-area alums who self identify as entrepreneurs to be potential guests.
 
“This will be very student focused,” Mr. Bachenheimer said. “It’s important for me to see how the students are using the lab and what is providing them with the most value.”
 
In fact, Mr. Bachenheimer says he has seen an increase in student interest in entrepreneurship in recent years. He blames this on the economy and the high unemployment rate. Students see creating their own companies as a safer route.
 
“They also want to make something meaningful and create something,” he said.
 
Part of the inspiration for this lab stemmed from competitions at other schools like Stanford University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Locally, New York University launched its Innovation Venture Fund in 2010. This group offers seed money for startups built at the university. In November, the organization helped organize an Entrepreneurs Festival for its students.
 
NYU also partnered with Columbia University to organize hackNY, an group that aims to connect tech-minded students with startups. Columbia has its own lab, Columbia Technology Ventures, which launches about a dozen startups per year.
 
Pace will be hosting a ribbon-cutting event Thursday evening at the lab to mark its official launch. In addition to members of the Pace community, speakers for the reception include Gurbaksh Chahal, the founder, chairman and CEO of online advertising network RadiumOne, and Robert Walsh, the commissioner at the city’s Department of Small Business Services.

Back Stage: A New College Program Trains Dancers to Work in Popular Entertainment

In September, Pace University, in Lower Manhattan, kicked off a new degree program: a Bachelor of Arts in theater arts with a specialized track in commercial dance. (Photo credit: Danicah Waldo).

In September, Pace University, in Lower Manhattan, kicked off a new degree program: a Bachelor of Arts in theater arts with a specialized track in commercial dance.

The program is featured in an article in Back Stage. Read more here:

A New College Program Trains Dancers to Work in Popular Entertainment.

NEWS RELEASE: Peace and Justice Studies Program Launched on International Day of Peace

Pace University announced today the launch of a Peace and Justice Studies minor in New York City, beginning this fall. (Left: Program head Professor Emily Welty, Ph.D.)

NOTE TO EDITORS: Classes have started and can be visited on request. Welty and Malone are available for interviews.

UN GENERAL ASSEMBLY MEETING DATE TO BE MARKED BY LAUNCH OF PEACE AND JUSTICE STUDIES PROGRAM AT PACE UNIVERSITY IN NEW YORK CITY

Offering is latest in trend of 200 similar efforts on US campuses

Practical courses will train for professional work in non-profit organizations, humanitarian and international aid, mediation, negotiation, diplomacy, economic development, and poverty reduction

NEW YORK, NY, September 21, 2011 – Pace University announced today the launch of a Peace and Justice Studies minor in New York City, beginning this fall.

In offering a Peace and Justice Studies minor in New York City, Pace joins over 200 colleges and universities offering similar programs, including Pace’s Pleasantville campus which has had a Peace and Justice program since 2007.

Students in Peace and Justice programs go on to professional careers in the growing areas of non-profit organizations, humanitarian and international aid work, mediation, negotiation, diplomacy, economic development, and poverty reduction.

The underlying philosophy at Pace is that attaining global peace and social justice is intertwined with such concrete matters as economic, social-political, and environmental sustainability.The Pace program examines peace-building, social justice, conflict resolution, sustainability, and humanitarian activities.

Marking the UN General Assembly

The launch date of September 21 was chosen because it is the International Day of Peace, established by a United Nations Resolution in 1981, which coincides with the opening of the UN General Assembly. The day is celebrated internationally as a way to recognize and reflect on the state of peace and conflict, and to encourage exploration of how to participate in practical peacemaking.

The program on the New York City campus is directed by political scientist Emily Welty, Ph.D. Welty studied at the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London in the Study of Religions where she focused on faith-based approaches to peace-building and development work in East Africa.  Welty has worked in a variety of cross-cultural and politically unstable contexts including Uganda, Kenya, Northern Ireland, Israel/Palestine, Cuba, Haiti, South Africa, and Sudan. Her research specialty is in the religious dimensions of conflict and peacemaking.

The 15-credit program has a required introductory course but is flexible, allowing students to combine it with other courses suited to their interests. It is housed in the Political Science Department.

Christopher Malone, Ph.D., Chair of the Pace Department of Political Science in New York City, said: “It is fitting that we launch Peace and Justice Studies today. And I am thrilled to have the program housed in Political Science.”

Students interested in the Peace and Justice Studies minor should contact Welty (ewelty@pace.edu) for more information.

About Pace University

For 105 years, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Contact:

Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

New York Post: “Dancing For Dollars”

A New York Post online editorial knocked the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation’s $1 million grant to Pace University for rehabilitation dance space – and grants to the Paul Taylor and Battery dance companies – as not germane to rebuilding lower Manhattan.

Read the complete editorial from the New York Post here: http://www.nypost.com/p/news/opinion/editorials/dancing_for_dollars_89Ec3zn7zoUZUaeU7IuchJ

 

DNAinfo.com: Downtown Nonprofits Get $17M in Grants

Pace will receive $1 million to expand dance rehearsal space.

From DNAinfo.com:
“Dozens of Downtown nonprofits will receive $17 million in post-9/11 recovery grants, the Lower Manhattan Development Corp. recently announced.”
Pace will receive $1 million to expand dance rehearsal space.

Read more: http://www.dnainfo.com/20110907/downtown/downtown-nonprofits-get-17m-grants#ixzz1XT4CqcLm

NEWS RELEASE: Pace Football Partners with Lustgartem Foundations for Pancreatic Cancer Research; Proceeds from Oct. 29 Bentley Game to Benefit Charity

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. – The Pace University Football Team is proud to announce their affiliation with The Lustgarten Foundation for Pancreatic Cancer Research.

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. – The Pace University Football Team is proud to announce their affiliation with The Lustgarten Foundation for Pancreatic Cancer Research.

Pace Football and The Lustgarten Foundation will work together to advance the scientific and medical research related to the diagnosis, treatment, cure and prevention of pancreatic cancer by heightening public awareness of pancreatic cancer and providing informational support for pancreatic cancer patients and their families and friends.  Pace Head Football Coach Chris Dapolito commented, “The Pace Football program is honored to partner with the Lustgarten Foundation. We are aware of the excellent work they have been doing and we are excited about being a part of their team.”

Marc Lustgarten, a graduate of Pace University, inspired the establishment of The Lustgarten Foundation for Pancreatic Cancer Research in 1999.  A Cablevision Vice Chairman and Chairman of Madison Square Garden, he died at age 52 following a struggle with pancreatic cancer. Lustgarten joined Cablevision in 1975 as assistant general counsel and quickly became instrumental in helping transform what was then solely a Long Island cable television system into a broad-based entertainment and sports colossus.

The Setters will take on Bentley University on October 29 at 1 pm where a portion of the ticket-sale proceeds will go to benefit The Lustgarten Foundation.  Representatives from the Foundation will be in attendance, accepting donations for pancreatic cancer research and giving out purple bracelets throughout the game. They will also provide the athletes with metal pins and bracelets prior to the game.

On April 1, 2012, Pace Football will participate in The Lustgarten Foundation’s Third Annual Westchester Pancreatic Cancer Research Walk, in Rye, New York.  The Foundation also hosts several other annual fundraising events that include the Grand Gourmet, the Marc Lustgarten Memorial Golf Outing and the Holiday Rock & Roll Bash.  For further information, go to www.lustgarten.org

About Pace Athletics: Pace University is an NCAA Division II member of the Northeast-10 Conference with 20 varsity sports teams. The Pace Athletics Department had 51% of its athletes in the Spring 2011 semester post a 3.0 GPA or higher to earn Northeast-10 Commissioner’s Honor Roll status. Six student athletes had a perfect 4.0 GPA for the semester as Pace ranked seventh out of 16 institutions in the NE-10.

About Pace University: For 105 years, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

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The Village Voice: Online Education’s Net Worth

“At Pace University, students can choose from nearly 600 online offerings; more than half of Pace students have taken an online course, compared to about a quarter of college students nationwide. Undergraduates can currently satisfy all their liberal arts requirements—60 credits, or half their degree hours—with online courses. A decade ago, Pace started an online degree program expressly for telecommunications workers, but this fall, the school will offer its first online bachelors’ programs for the general public, in business and computer science.”

The Village Voice explores options in online learning for college students in the August 10 article, “Online Education’s Net Worth.”

From the article:

At Pace University, students can choose from nearly 600 online offerings; more than half of Pace students have taken an online course, compared to about a quarter of college students nationwide. Undergraduates can currently satisfy all their liberal arts requirements—60 credits, or half their degree hours—with online courses. A decade ago, Pace started an online degree program expressly for telecommunications workers, but this fall, the school will offer its first online bachelors’ programs for the general public, in business and computer science.

“We were starting to get inquiries from former Pace students who wanted to finish their degrees, and we decided to help them,” explains Christine Shakespeare, special advisor for strategic initiatives. To be accepted into either degree program, students must have already completed 56 credit hours at an accredited institution and maintained a GPA of at least 2.5.

The online degrees cost much less per credit hour than Pace’s traditional degree programs: $535 per credit as opposed to $937 per credit for a part-time student. (Full-time undergraduates pay a flat $16,328 for 12 to 18 credits.) “The price is competitive with what the online institutions are offering,” Shakespeare says. “We have the resources and the history of a traditional nonprofit institution, so we’d like to attract the students who have been turning to the online schools with some dubious results.”

Worse than face-to-face?

Pace’s measured approach to awarding online degrees is typical, as universities are attracted by the promises of lower costs and larger audiences but struggle with the paucity of research into whether students learn as well in an online setting.

Read the full article here:

Online Educations Net Worth – Page 1 – News – New York – Village Voice.