60-Minute Entrepreneurship Tool-Building Workshop for Women Set for October 23

Pace University, in partnership with Make Mine A Million $ Business, presents a special session to help women entrepreneurs cross the million-dollar threshold: Business Tool-Building in 60 Minutes

Contact: Samuella Becker
Pace University Public Information
(212) 346-1637; sbecker2@pace.edu

MEDIA ALERT
Pace University, in partnership with Make Mine A Million $ Business, presents a special session to help women entrepreneurs cross the million-dollar threshold:

BUSINESS TOOL- BUILDING in 60 MINUTES

WHAT: A fast-paced, practical hour for fledgling women entrepreneurs, with faculty from Pace’s Lubin School of Business and its Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. Schedule below. Research-based advice will comprise work-life balance and human resources practices, cash control, roadblocks to growth, search engine optimization, internet marketing and website design. The professional education offered by these schools recently helped propel three of their students to the top ranks of entrepreneurs chosen by Business Week and Fortune Small Business.

WHEN AND WHERE
Tuesday, October 23, 2007
10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. (Doors open at 10:00 AM for registration)
Pace University
1 Pace Plaza (east of City Hall)
Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts
Media admission by press pass.

URL Link: page.cfm?doc_id=28375 (or see below)

BACKGROUND:
The session is part of a day-long event in which women business owners from around the country are coming to Pace University’ s downtown New York campus to compete for money, marketing, mentoring and technology that will help them build million-dollar enterprises.

Twenty finalists will go head-to-head in the afternoon, competing for ten awards packages to support their growth. The Make Mine a Million $ Business program (www.makemineamillion.org), launched by the nonprofit organization Count Me In for Women’s Economic Independence and its founding partner OPEN from American Express®, is designed to help post-start-up, women-owned businesses exceed $1 million in revenues.

Thousands of women have launched their own businesses. However, only 3% of women-owned businesses have annual revenues that exceed one million dollars.

Morning attendees will get advice from the faculty members who recently taught Vitaly Feldman ’06, and Alexander Koretsky ’04, among Business Week’s “25 Best Entrepreneurs Under 25” and William Phelps ’08, a finalist in the Fortune Small Business 5th Annual Business Plan Competition.

SCHEDULE for the morning session:

“Business Tool-Building in 60 Minutes”

Welcoming Remarks – 10:30 AM
Joseph R. Baczko
Dean of the Lubin School of Business, Pace University

Joseph R. Baczko is Dean of the Lubin School of Business at Pace University. Before becoming dean, Mr. Baczko held senior leadership positions with a number of high growth international companies—he was Chairman and CEO of Frank’s Nurseries & Crafts, president and COO of Blockbuster Entertainment Corp., founding President of Toys R Us International, and CEO of Max Factor-Europe. Mr. Baczko is a graduate of the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University and earned an MBA from Harvard University. He is a former officer in the US Marine Corps and served in Vietnam.

Juggling Acts
Corinne Post, PhD, Assistant Professor of Management

Corinne Post, Ph.D, specializes in work-family linkages, cross-cultural and career issues. One of her current projects centers on the management of diversity for innovation. Dr. Post received her Ph.D. in Organization Management from Rutgers University. Recent publications have appeared in Administrative Science Quarterly, Journal of Applied Psychology, and Journal of Family and Economic Issues.

The Top Ten Human Resources Mistakes Not to Make
Melissa S. Cardon, PhD, Assistant Professor of Management

Melissa S. Cardon (PhD, Columbia University) focuses on unleashing human potential within entrepreneurial firms, including HR practices that maximize employee potential and the emotional and relational aspects of entrepreneurs that help optimize their behavior and performance. Recent publications have appeared in Human Resource Management and the Journal of Business Venturing.

Cash Control
Susanne O’Callaghan, PhD, Professor of Accounting

Susanne O’Callaghan, PhD, is an expert on how to manage and control the life blood of any organization, large or small, especially those that are growing. She received her PhD in Accounting from the University of Cincinnati. Research interests include Neural Networks, Internal Controls and Behavioral Aspects of Accounting.

Breaking through the Roadblocks to Growth:
Strategies to Help Entrepreneurs Reach the Next Level
Bruce Bachenheimer, Clinical Professor of Management
Director of Entrepreneurship
Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship Faculty Fellow

Bruce Bachenheimer is on the board of the MIT Enterprise Forum of NYC and serves as a consultant to the NYC Department of Small Business Services and iQ Venture Partners. Bruce founded Annapolis Maritime Corp. and co-founded StockCentral Australia. He is also a Judge for the 2007 New York Make Mine a Million $ Business event.

Search Engine Optimization Demystified
Jonathan Hill, DPS
Assistant Dean, Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems

Jonathan Hill is the Assistant Dean for Special Programs and Projects at the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace University. With expertise in leveraging technology to build business, enable creativity and enhance learning, Dr. Hill has worked for both academic and private sector organizations.

Internet Marketing Toolbox
James Gabberty, PhD, Associate Professor of Information Systems

James Gabberty worked as an IT practitioner for more than 20 years in NYC’s financial community. With real-world experience and academic rigor, he specializes in strategic systems planning & IT competitiveness. Professor Gabberty’s research includes international business and the impact that technology has on domestic firms, multinational corporations and nations.

The H (Human) Factor: Psychology of Website Design
Jennifer D.E. Thomas, PhD, Professor of Information Systems

Jennifer D.E. Thomas received her Ph.D. and M.B.A. from Concordia University, Montreal, Canada, and her Bachelor of Commerce from McGill University. Research interests include Knowledge Management, Human Factors, Multimedia and the Impact of Technology Integration on Pedagogy.

How to Sign Up

Registration available onsite the day of the event, Tuesday, October 23 beginning at 10 AM. at Pace University, Spruce St. entrance (between Park Row and Gold Sts.) Learn more at www.makemineamillion.org

Pace and Entrepreneurship hot links

• Entrepreneurship@Lubin < www.pace.edu/entrepreneurship>
• Annual Pace Pitch Contest www.pace.edu/pitch
• Annual Pace Business Plan Competition www.pace.edu/bpc
• Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship <www.pace.edu/wilsoncenter>
• Pace’s Small Business Development Center www.pace.edu/sbdc
• SCI2 incubator www.sci2.org>
• Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Technology – page.cfm?doc_id=16399

New Study Shows Managerial Career Success for Women is Unrelated to Marital or Parental Status

The publicity surrounding Sylvia Ann Hewlett’s new book, “Creating a Life: Professional Women and the Quest for Children” has focused on the substantial risk professional women face when they postpone having children in order to improve their chances for career success: infertility.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

NEW STUDY SHOWS MANAGERIAL CAREER SUCCESS FOR WOMEN IS UNRELATED TO MARITAL OR PARENTAL STATUS
— Marriage and Motherhood Do Not Diminish Career Rewards —

New York, NY – September 25, 2002 – The publicity surrounding Sylvia Ann Hewlett’s new book, “Creating a Life: Professional Women and the Quest for Children” has focused on the substantial risk professional women face when they postpone having children in order to improve their chances for career success: infertility.

A new study published in the Journal of Business Ethics, Managerial Life Without a Wife, conducted by researchers at Pace University and Rider University, suggests that for women, it is not the choice between children and career that determines success.

“Women managers who put off marriage and family for the sake of their careers do not necessarily achieve greater success,” says Frieda Reitman, Professor of Management, Emerita-in-Residence at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business and co-author of the study. “The results of our study show that family structure seems to be unrelated to the amount of career success that women achieve. Therefore the dedicated career woman who wants to have children does not have to wait until it is too late to conceive.”

Researchers at Pace University and Rider University analyzed data from two MBA alumni cohorts: one older cohort (MBAs from 1975-1980; average age 51) with data collected over a thirteen-year period, and a second younger cohort (MBAs from 1990-1995; average age 38). The analysis was conducted on those employed full-time who were in four main family structures: single; married/both employed; married/with children/both employed; and married/with children/not employed spouse. Four success variables were measured for the older cohort (income, managerial level, salary progression over 13 years, career satisfaction) and three for the younger cohort (income, managerial level, career satisfaction).

The results of the study show:

· Being single or married without children is more prevalent for women than men, (41% versus 20%), respectively, signaling that women may feel they have to forgo marriage and/or family to meet the demands of a managerial career;

· Success for men is related to family structure. The greatest organizational rewards go to men, especially men with stay-at-home spouses. (They earn 56% percent more than other men.)

· Being married and having children doesn’t seem to hinder the career success of managerial women who are employed full-time, even with some work interruptions.

“The good news for women is that they do not have to forego marriage or parenthood to advance their careers,” says Joy Schneer, Chair of the Management and Human Resources Department at Rider University and co-author of the study. “The bad news is that it is still harder for women than men to succeed, no matter their family structure.”

The paper, “Managerial Life Without a Wife,” was published in the April 2002 issue of the Journal of Business Ethics.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart International Airport in New Windsor. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School.