Crain’s New York Business: Executive Moves, April 2, 2012

Lubin Professor Bruce Bachenheimer’s appointment as Director of Pace’s new entrepreneurship lab continues to make news.

Crain’s New York Business included Professor Bachenheimer’s appointment in this week’s Executive Moves column, along with his photo: 

Pace University:
Bruce Bachenheimer, 50, was promoted to director of the university’s entrepreneurship lab. He will continue as clinical professor of management. He was previously program director of entrepreneurship at the Lubin School of Business.

NEWS RELEASE: “Pace University and Hitachi America, Ltd. Encourage Educators To Take A Technological “Leap” Forward on February 29, 2012”

On Leap Day 2012, The Helene & Grant Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Pace University and Hitachi America, Ltd. are teaming up to offer a free program to encourage educators to “leap” into the technological future and explore innovations such as the use of avatars in the classroom.

Pace University and Hitachi America, Ltd. Encourage Educators To Take

A Technological “Leap” Forward on February 29, 2012

– -Hosting Free Program on the Role of Technology in Education–

(Tarrytown, NY) February 24, 2012 – Hitachi America, Ltd., a subsidiary of Hitachi, Ltd. (NYSE: HIT/TSE: 6501) located in Tarrytown, NY, and Pace University’s Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship are co-sponsoring a free, full-morning education program for nonprofit and education organizations focused on the role of technology in education and helping students reach their full potential.

This year’s program is entitled “Inspired Education: Learning, Teaching and Technology.” The program will explore the impact of technology on education, how it has altered the way we teach and the way the students learn. The use of avatars in the role of virtual students is just one technological innovation that will be discussed. Pace University is one of only 10 universities nationwide to use the TeachLivE avatar lab technology, which immerses future teachers in a simulated classroom where they practice making real-time decisions in response to the dynamic features of classroom learning.  Similar to the way pilots use simulators to hone their skills, the avatars help future teachers practice managing a classroom and students with various personalities and challenges before being in a live classroom. The forum will also explore how technology has both narrowed and widened the gap between affluent and low income students and how it is being employed to help some students with special needs. Panelists include a professor from Pace who is actively involved in the TeachLivE avatar lab, a curriculum consultant, the administrator for a school that works specifically with dyslexic children and the executive director of an education non-profit organization in Yonkers.

 The program will take place at Pace University’s Graduate Center located in downtown White Plains, NY and will run from 10:00 am – 12:00 pm on Wednesday, February 29, 2012. The campus is located at 1 Martine Avenue. Registration and a light breakfast will begin at 9:00 am and the panel discussion will begin at 10:00 am. Media admission by press pass.

Panelists include:

The program is free, but advance registration is required due to limited seating. Attendance is limited to members of nonprofit organizations. Participants can register online at:

Pace University/Hitachi America, Ltd. Nonprofit Forum Registration

This is the fourth year that Hitachi America, Ltd. has spearheaded this program and the third year that Pace University’s Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship has served as a co-sponsor.

The Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship was created in 2005 to serve the nonprofit community and Pace University. The Center provides scholarly research, academic programs, advisory services and roundtable discussions to encourage excellence and enhance managerial leadership skills of professionals within the nonprofit sector.

“Educational programs that encourage thoughtful exploration of issues surrounding nonprofit effectiveness and efficiency are at the core of our mission at the Wilson Center,” said Rebecca Tekula, PhD, the Center’s Executive Director. “We are proud to once again work with Hitachi America, Ltd. on what promises to be an enlightening discussion for the nonprofit, education and student communities.”

“We are excited to be sponsoring this educational program that will engage participants in a discussion about the role of technology in education,” said Lauren Raguzin, Director of Community Relations for Hitachi America, Ltd. “I am appreciative of our continued partnership with The Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Pace University in putting this program together.”

About Hitachi America

Hitachi America, Ltd., headquartered in Tarrytown, New York, a subsidiary of Hitachi, Ltd., and its subsidiary companies, offers a broad range of electronics, power and industrial equipment and services, automotive products and consumer electronics with operations throughout the Americas. For more information, visit www.hitachi-america.us. For information on other Hitachi Group companies in the United States, please visit www.hitachi.us.

Hitachi, Ltd., (NYSE: HIT / TSE: 6501), headquartered in Tokyo, Japan, is a leading global electronics company with approximately 360,000 employees worldwide. Fiscal 2010 (ended March 31, 2011) consolidated revenues totaled 9,315 billion yen ($112.2 billion). Hitachi will focus more than ever on the Social Innovation Business, which includes information and telecommunication systems, power systems, environmental, industrial and transportation systems, and social and urban systems, as well as the sophisticated materials and key devices that support them. For more information on Hitachi, please visit Hitachi’s website at www.hitachi.com.  

About the Wilson Center
The Helene and Grant Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship is an institute of Pace University aiming to serve students and nonprofit organizations by encouraging more effective and efficient nonprofit management practices through research, colloquia and continuing education programs. The Center was launched with a $5 million gift from Helene and Grant Wilson, entrepreneurs and philanthropists whose involvement with nonprofits has convinced them that entrepreneurial management can help these organizations increase their impact.

About Pace University

For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

Visit us on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter:  NYC | PLV

###

Contacts: 
Lauren Raguzin
Hitachi America, Ltd. 
(914)333-2986 
Lauren.Raguzin@hal.hitachi.com

The Star-Ledger: “Will a provision in Obama’s jobs bill to protect the unemployed help? Career experts respond.”

President Obama has proposed passing a law prohibiting discrimination against the jobless. Is this a good idea that will help the jobless find jobs, or are the only people it will help find employment lawyers? Lisa J. Stamatelos, an adjunct professor of human resources management at the Lubin School of Business, gives her thoughts on the pros and cons of this legislation to Lee Miller, Career Columnist of The Star-Ledger.

Buried within President Obama’s proposed $447 billion jobs bill is a provision creating a new category of individuals against whom it will be illegal to discriminate — the unemployed.

There is a near unanimous consensus that failing to consider individuals that are unemployed to fill job vacancies is a bad business decision because there is a wealth of outstanding talent who, through no fault of their own, find themselves unemployed.  A strong argument can also be made that treating these individuals, who are desperately seeking work, as expendable is morally wrong. Just because something is wrong, however, doesn’t necessarily mean that the best way to remedy the problem is to pass a law.

Lisa J. Stamatelos, an adjunct professor of human resources management at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business, describes the proposal as “sounding good in theory, but useless in practice” in Sunday’s edition of The Star-Ledger

“The proposed law would boost the caseload of employment lawyers and put another cost burden on employers of defending themselves against frivolous lawsuits,” she adds. “Being unemployed may also sometimes be a legitimate reason for not hiring someone, if their skills have become antiquated.”

Bloomberg Businessweek: “Executives Teaching in B-School”

Some academic theories might be best understood by the people who put those theories into practice.

Practitioners who teach have their failures as well as their successes on display for students. They also serve as a sounding board for students seeking practical career advice.

Business schools have come to value the practitioner’s perspective, and they are increasingly making room for those viewpoints on their staffs. Bloomberg Businessweek identified 25 top executives who teach/guest lecture, including Neil Braun, Dean of the Lubin School of Business.

Neil Braun: Viacom Entertainment

Who: Chief executive officer, Viacom Entertainment (VIA), 1988-94; president, NBC Television Network, 1994-98
Where: Pace University’s Lubin School of Business
What: Dean, guest lecturer

Braun joined a growing list of former executives tapped to run business schools when he was named dean of Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in June 2010. Braun also flits in and out of the classroom as a guest lecturer. He says he has his most rapt audience any time the discussion topic is M&A negotiations. During his time at Viacom, the company bought Blockbuster and Paramount Pictures. “Students hang on every word when you can tell them what was really going on,” he says of those deals in Bloomberg Businessweek.

Crain’s New York Business.com: “How to handle, and profit from, last-minute jobs”

Entrepreneurs are finding that in this economy, they can’t afford to refuse 11th-hour projects. Professor Bruce Bachenheimer on why being prepared to assist Johnny-come-lately clients can be a good way to boost revenue when growth is hard to come by.

Making the most of late orders can be a win-win. 

“With all of the uncertainty, tight purse strings and risk-aversion, people are waiting until the last minute” to make purchases, said Bruce Bachenheimer, clinical professor of management and director of the entrepreneurship program at Pace University.  Increasing globalization has intensified competition in many fields and destroyed traditional business hours.

“You may have to work on Sunday at 2 a.m. to fill an order going outside of the U.S.” Mr. Bachenheimer said in an article appearing on Crain’s New York Business.com

Consumer Reports Money Adviser: “Want to be your own boss?”

If you think only young people have the guts and stamina to start a business, think again.

The highest rate of American business startups is in the 55-to-64 age group, and nearly one-quarter of baby boomers are self-employed, acccording to the Kauffman Foundation. But you need more than a good idea to run a successful business, says Bruce Bachenheimer, who launched several successful entrepreneurial ventures before beginning his career as a professor.

Becoming a successful entrepreneur isn’t easy …  even for those with advanced degrees and healthy bank accounts.   Here are some steps to becoming your own boss.

* Be honest with yourself.  Not everyone is cut out to be an entrepreneur.  “The best are risk takers confident in themselves and their ideas,” Bruce Bachenheimer, a professor of management at Pace University in New York told Consumer Reports Money Advisor, a newsletter distributed to about 300,000 paid subscribers.

* Take time to consider what you’re giving up or getting into.  Do you need a structured environment?  A steady paycheck?  Are you fleeing a bosss only to find all customers will be your boss?” Bachenheimer asks.  “Are you dumping a time clock but investing 100 hours a week?”

* Buying an existing business can be a good route.  “Sometimes owners run out of capital or enthusiasm,” Bachenheimer says.  “You can get a lot of assets, inventory, and a client base.”  Still, he warns buyers to perform due diligence to prevent gettting stuck with someone else’s bad debts.  

* Smart entrepreneurs surround themselves with even smarter experts.  Find a financial consultant or lawyer for advice, but choose advisers carefully.  “Don’t pay hucksters to do things that are free – like obtaining an employer identification number,”  Bachenheimer says.  “Anyone can sell themselves as an expert, so get references and proposals.”

* Funding will probably come from your own bank account, not from some wealthy venture capitalist.  Even bank loans are tough to get these days.  “Once your business has some cash flow, you might find it easier to get a small-business loan, Bachenheimer says.

MidHudsonNews.com: “Cronin awarded Jefferson Gold Medal”

John Cronin has been a part of the Hudson River environmental movement since 1973 when he started with the Clearwater organization. He reflects how Clearwater founder Pete Seeger recruited him as a volunteer.

John Cronin is a senior fellow at Pace University and executive director of the Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries.

He can also add another title to his resume, a recipient of the Jefferson Award, named for Thomas Jefferson and founded by former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis as a “Noble Prize for public service.”

Cronin was described by the Jefferson Awards Board of Selectors as “Hero for the Planet [and] equal parts detective, scientist and public advocate.” The board said his efforts “have inspired a legacy of programs across the globe, fighting pollution on six continents.”

The MidHudsonNews reports Pace University President Stephen Friedman nominated Cronin for the award, for which Cronin said he was both humbled and honored.

Poughkeepsie Journal: “Hudson River steward receives Jefferson Award”

Steward of the Hudson River and water quality, John Cronin, received a 2011 Jefferson Award for his decades of public service.

John Cronin, a resident of Cold Spring, is known for his 17 years at environmental group Riverkeeper, and is the director and CEO of Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries. He is also a Pace University senior fellow.

At the Beacon Institute, Cronin directs a program that monitors rivers and estuaries using a network of sensors and robotics.

He lectures on the environment, co-authored “The Riverkeepers” with Robert F. Kennedy Jr., and wrote and co-produced the film “The Last Rivermen.”

Cronin told the Poughkeepsie Journal that he credited folksinger Pete Seeger and Pace University as his sources of inspiration.

The Journal News: “Ex-Riverkeeper John Cronin receives Jefferson Award”

Former Riverkeeper John Cronin joined a select group this week that included U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and actress Marlo Thomas.

They all received what has been dubbed the “Nobel Prize” for public service — the Jefferson Award.

John Cronin, 60, has worked on environmental issues facing the Hudson River for nearly four decades and was one of 18 people honored with  The Jefferson Award in a ceremony in Washington, DC, Tuesday night.

“It was quite a surprise,” Cronin said Friday to The Journal News. “Some of the awards are known ahead of time, others are kept under wraps. I was just going there to represent Pace University. I still haven’t figured out who knew and who didn’t.”

“The big theme of the two days was that everyday people can change the world,” Cronin said. “It reminded me what a special place the Hudson River Valley is, that we started an environmental movement before there was an Earth Day, when environmentalism wasn’t very popular at all.”

Representing Pace, Cronin was given a Champion award, presented to two “exceptional individuals whose volunteer work reflects the deep and abiding commitment of their employers to making a different in the communities where their employees live and work.”

The award cited his work as an environmental advocate for nearly four decades, serving “on the front lines of water-quality issues as a legislative aide, riverkeeper, and as the co-founder of the Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic, a nationally acclaimed training program for law students and educators.”

Cronin is director and CEO of Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries, and a Senior Fellow for Environmental Affairs, Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies at Pace University.

Crain’s New York Business: “Tips for tricky task of raising prices”

Many entrepreneurs are concerned about keeping their businesses profitable as inflation threatens to increase overhead expenses.

More small businesses are thinking of changing price structure as inflation threatens.

Bruce Bachenheimer, clinical professor of management and director of the entrepreneurship program at Pace University, advocates that small business owners should first “Do a small-scale test” to determine if and how their company should raise prices.

“A pilot hike will help you gauge customer reactions and mitigate risks, ” said Professor Bachenheimer in an article in Crain’s New York Business. For example, if you have two stores, raise prices on select items or at just one location.