Deliver Magazine: “Direct the Marketing Focus at Women”

Lubin Professor Paul Kurnit on how direct marketing influences the spending of women, whether the product is doing itself a disservice by targeting women differently than men and the importance of reaching female spending power.

Despite the good dollars and sense it makes to create a direct marketing campaign aimed at women, getting it right can be a challenge — considering marketers do not want to stereotype or offend.

Avoid One Big Basket

“In general, I think businesses get too sloppy and greedy by trying to be all things to all people,” says Paul Kurnit, clinical professor of marketing at Pace University. “Brands that do this run the risk of being nothing to anyone.”

Kurnit points out in Deliver, a magazine for marketers from the United States Postal Service, that even the biggest brands clearly understand the need to customize their communications, messaging and media for different market segments. 

For example, a prominent women’s organization and one of the global leaders in the breast cancer movement doesn’t send the same information out to all women, but creates personalized direct mail based on demographics.

Make it Relational, Not Transactional

Segmenting women into various groups is a critical step in direct marketing, but choosing what to send to those women is just as essential.

Paul Kurnit of Pace University cites the luxury travel market as a perfect example. Today’s travel operators are targeting women with brochures that feature photos not just of glamorous destinations but of couples being together and having a good time in those places. “By focusing on the relationship, not just the destination, they are speaking to their female customers,” says Kurnit.

Think Beyond the Bedroom

As for the future of direct marketing, the real winners will be the companies that take an integrated approach and combine direct mail marketing with online activities, like the new Cards app. The application allows users to design the card online, but then it gets printed out by the third party, put in an envelope and sent by regular mail to the recipient.

“Today’s woman is online, but her lifestyle still demands a personal touch,” says Kurnit.

NEWS RELEASE: “Pace University and Hitachi America, Ltd. Encourage Educators To Take A Technological “Leap” Forward on February 29, 2012”

On Leap Day 2012, The Helene & Grant Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Pace University and Hitachi America, Ltd. are teaming up to offer a free program to encourage educators to “leap” into the technological future and explore innovations such as the use of avatars in the classroom.

Pace University and Hitachi America, Ltd. Encourage Educators To Take

A Technological “Leap” Forward on February 29, 2012

– -Hosting Free Program on the Role of Technology in Education–

(Tarrytown, NY) February 24, 2012 – Hitachi America, Ltd., a subsidiary of Hitachi, Ltd. (NYSE: HIT/TSE: 6501) located in Tarrytown, NY, and Pace University’s Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship are co-sponsoring a free, full-morning education program for nonprofit and education organizations focused on the role of technology in education and helping students reach their full potential.

This year’s program is entitled “Inspired Education: Learning, Teaching and Technology.” The program will explore the impact of technology on education, how it has altered the way we teach and the way the students learn. The use of avatars in the role of virtual students is just one technological innovation that will be discussed. Pace University is one of only 10 universities nationwide to use the TeachLivE avatar lab technology, which immerses future teachers in a simulated classroom where they practice making real-time decisions in response to the dynamic features of classroom learning.  Similar to the way pilots use simulators to hone their skills, the avatars help future teachers practice managing a classroom and students with various personalities and challenges before being in a live classroom. The forum will also explore how technology has both narrowed and widened the gap between affluent and low income students and how it is being employed to help some students with special needs. Panelists include a professor from Pace who is actively involved in the TeachLivE avatar lab, a curriculum consultant, the administrator for a school that works specifically with dyslexic children and the executive director of an education non-profit organization in Yonkers.

 The program will take place at Pace University’s Graduate Center located in downtown White Plains, NY and will run from 10:00 am – 12:00 pm on Wednesday, February 29, 2012. The campus is located at 1 Martine Avenue. Registration and a light breakfast will begin at 9:00 am and the panel discussion will begin at 10:00 am. Media admission by press pass.

Panelists include:

The program is free, but advance registration is required due to limited seating. Attendance is limited to members of nonprofit organizations. Participants can register online at:

Pace University/Hitachi America, Ltd. Nonprofit Forum Registration

This is the fourth year that Hitachi America, Ltd. has spearheaded this program and the third year that Pace University’s Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship has served as a co-sponsor.

The Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship was created in 2005 to serve the nonprofit community and Pace University. The Center provides scholarly research, academic programs, advisory services and roundtable discussions to encourage excellence and enhance managerial leadership skills of professionals within the nonprofit sector.

“Educational programs that encourage thoughtful exploration of issues surrounding nonprofit effectiveness and efficiency are at the core of our mission at the Wilson Center,” said Rebecca Tekula, PhD, the Center’s Executive Director. “We are proud to once again work with Hitachi America, Ltd. on what promises to be an enlightening discussion for the nonprofit, education and student communities.”

“We are excited to be sponsoring this educational program that will engage participants in a discussion about the role of technology in education,” said Lauren Raguzin, Director of Community Relations for Hitachi America, Ltd. “I am appreciative of our continued partnership with The Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Pace University in putting this program together.”

About Hitachi America

Hitachi America, Ltd., headquartered in Tarrytown, New York, a subsidiary of Hitachi, Ltd., and its subsidiary companies, offers a broad range of electronics, power and industrial equipment and services, automotive products and consumer electronics with operations throughout the Americas. For more information, visit www.hitachi-america.us. For information on other Hitachi Group companies in the United States, please visit www.hitachi.us.

Hitachi, Ltd., (NYSE: HIT / TSE: 6501), headquartered in Tokyo, Japan, is a leading global electronics company with approximately 360,000 employees worldwide. Fiscal 2010 (ended March 31, 2011) consolidated revenues totaled 9,315 billion yen ($112.2 billion). Hitachi will focus more than ever on the Social Innovation Business, which includes information and telecommunication systems, power systems, environmental, industrial and transportation systems, and social and urban systems, as well as the sophisticated materials and key devices that support them. For more information on Hitachi, please visit Hitachi’s website at www.hitachi.com.  

About the Wilson Center
The Helene and Grant Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship is an institute of Pace University aiming to serve students and nonprofit organizations by encouraging more effective and efficient nonprofit management practices through research, colloquia and continuing education programs. The Center was launched with a $5 million gift from Helene and Grant Wilson, entrepreneurs and philanthropists whose involvement with nonprofits has convinced them that entrepreneurial management can help these organizations increase their impact.

About Pace University

For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

Visit us on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter:  NYC | PLV

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Contacts: 
Lauren Raguzin
Hitachi America, Ltd. 
(914)333-2986 
Lauren.Raguzin@hal.hitachi.com

Westchester County Business Journal: “Bachenheimer now runs E-Lab”

Pace University’s new Entrepreneurship Lab, known as the E-Lab, is available to all Pace students, in New York City and in Pleasantville.

Pace University’s new Entrepreneurship Lab, known as the E-Lab, now has a CEO –  it’s professor Bruce Bachenheimer of Chappaqua. A clinical professor of management at Pace, Bachenheimer is now also the director of the E-Lab. It is available to all Pace students, in New York City and in Pleasantville.

Bachenheimer will advise all aspiring student entrepreneurs, in everything from accounting and computer science to law and the performing arts, noted the Westchester County Business Journal.

He came up with the idea for the annual Pace Pitch Contest and Business Plan Competition, which he introduced in 2004, just after joining the Lubin School of Business faculty.

“The Entrepreneurship Lab aims to foster an entrepreneurial mindset – a way of thinking and acting that focuses on developing new ways to solve problems and create value,” said Bachenheimer. “These skills are important not only for those seeking to establish a new venture, but are increasingly critical in a wide variety of professional careers given today’s hyper-competitive marketplace, where rapid technological innovation and globalization has led to corporate downsizing and a dramatic change in the very nature of work.”

Bachenheimer began his career as a Wall Street trader, and then took several years off to sail through the Caribbean to South America. After that, he launched an importing business and then moved into high-tech forensic science before joining Pace.

NEWS RELEASE: “Pace University Opens Entrepreneurship Lab to Foster Student Innovation, Initiative and Commitment; Bruce Bachenheimer Named Lab’s First Director

Pace University has deep “roots” in innovation and entrepreneurship. Pace was founded more than 100 years ago by two exemplars of entrepreneurship, the brothers Homer and Charles Pace. With a $600 loan, they rented a classroom in Lower Manhattan to teach the principles of business to men and women aspiring to a better life.

Pace University Opens Entrepreneurship Lab to Foster Student Innovation, Initiative and Commitment

Professor Bruce Bachenheimer – Serial Entrepreneur, Board Member of the MIT Enterprise Forum, and Authority on Collegiate Entrepreneurship – Named Lab’s First Director

NEW YORK, NY, February 13, 2012 – A ribbon-cutting ceremony on Thursday, February 16, to be attended by members of New York City’s “entrepreneurship ecosystem” will mark the official launch of the new Pace University Entrepreneurship Lab (E-Lab), which is expected to both nurture the entrepreneurial spirit on campus and serve as a beacon for innovation in the Lower Manhattan community. 

Those scheduled to be on hand at the inauguration of the new space on the third floor at 163 William Street in New York City and give brief entrepreneurial-encouraging remarks at the invitation-only reception include (in alphabetical order):

  • Bruce Bachenheimer, Director of the Entrepreneurship Lab and Clinical Professor of Management, Lubin School of Business
  • Neil S. Braun, Dean of the Lubin School of Business and former President of the NBC Television Network and CEO & Chairman of Viacom Entertainment
  • Gurbaksh Chahal, Founder, Chairman & CEO of RadiumOne.  A die-hard internet entrepreneur, “G” also launched ClickAgents and BlueLithium.
  • Somak Chattopadhyay, Partner at Tribeca Venture Partners – Early Stage Venture Capitalist
  • Harold O. Levy, Pace Trustee and Managing Director of Palm Ventures, Former NYC Schools Chancellor
  • Robert W. Walsh, Commissioner – New York City Department of Small Business Services

They’ll be joined by Robert Caucci (Pace BBA ‘11, Entrepreneurship; Pace BS ‘11, Business Economics) and Jeremy Pease (Pace BS ’12, Computer Science), co-founders of Reslutions, who had the 2011 Winning New Business Concept Pitch at Pace’s Seventh Annual Pitch Contest. Reslutions is a platform that digitizes and streamlines all of the processes associated with a collegiate housing department and stemmed from the co-founders experience as college resident advisors.

Entrepreneurship: The Heart of Business Education 

In addition to 163 William Street in Manhattan, Pace will be simultaneously opening an Entrepreneurship Lab at the Goldstein Academic Building on its Pleasantville, NY, campus. Both E-Labs will provide the tools and mentoring for the development of business plans and the seed capital for new ventures. The E-Labs will also host events featuring guest speakers, workshops and competitions, many of which will be open to the public.

“Entrepreneurship, in its broadest sense, is a personal approach for developing ideas into plans and plans into reality. It is interdisciplinary ‘doing.’  Entrepreneurial leadership is as important in large companies as it is in startups; it’s a mindset toward relentless problem solving that leads to successful execution” said Braun, who in his career has assumed many different type of roles, including internet entrepreneur, television network president, corporate attorney, CEO and film producer. “It is therefore at the heart of business education; it is the ultimate capstone for applying the knowledge and skills of the discrete disciplines to a product or service for a specific market opportunity. 

Professor Bruce Bachenheimer is ideally suited to lead the E-Labs and grow the program,” continued Braun.  “Bruce’s relationships throughout the New York City venture community and beyond will be an important building block as we seek to further enhance our standing in, and access to, professionals in the field.” 

Bachenheimer is the visionary behind the annual Pace Pitch Contest and Business Plan Competition, which he introduced in 2004, shortly after joining the Lubin faculty. Additionally, he is a member of the Board of Directors and past Chairman of the MIT Enterprise Forum of New York City and has served on the organization’s Global Board. Bachenheimer also serves on the Board of Directors & Advisors of LeadAmerica and has served as a consultant to the NYC Department of Small Business Services and the New York City Economic Development Corp. He founded Annapolis Maritime Corp. and co-founded StockCentral Australia. 

“The Entrepreneurship Lab aims to foster an entrepreneurial mindset – a way of thinking and acting that focuses on developing new ways to solve problems and create value,” said Bachenheimer, who drafted the initial proposal of the E- Lab. “These skills are important not only for those seeking to establish a new venture, but are increasingly critical in a wide variety of professional careers given today’s hyper-competitive marketplace, where rapid technological innovation and globalization has led to corporate downsizing and a dramatic change in the very nature of work.”

Bachenheimer began his career as a Wall Street trader then had the courage to take a step back from the rat race and go sailing … for several years. After sailing through the Caribbean to South America, he headed to Annapolis, Maryland, where he launched a business importing teak lumber and taught himself yacht joinery. Bachenheimer then transitioned to a career in high-tech forensic science, where he served as the International Product Manager for an entrepreneurial venture, conducting business in over 20 countries. Several years later, Bachenheimer received the prestigious McKinsey & Company Leadership Scholarship to pursue and MBA degree, which he earned from the Australian Graduate School of Management. While completing his degree, he co-founded StockCentral Australia, which grew to become one of the largest financial websites in the country. A Pace alumni, Bachenheimer earned a BBA, Summa Cum Laude, from the Lubin School of Business.  He was conversational in Japanese and spent a semester at Tsukuba National University in Japan as an undergraduate. 

 About Entrepreneurship Studies in the Lubin School of Business at Pace University

The Entrepreneurship Labs on the New York and Pleasantville campuses (www.pace.edu/entlab) build on Pace’s well-established undergraduate and graduate entrepreneurship curriculum and activities such as the Pace Pitch Contest, Business Plan Competition, and Entrepreneur In Residence program. www.pace.edu/entrepreneurship 

About Pace University 

For 105 years, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

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Pace Media Contact: Samuella Becker, sbecker2@pace.edu; 212-346-1637 (office) or 917-734-5172 (mobile)

914INC: “Westchester Corporations’ Charitable Involvement”

Rebecca Tekula, PhD, and Anna-Kay Sinclair of The Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Pace University are interviewed about corporate philanthropy in Westchester—who gives and what they get in return.

Hundreds of companies make a conscious effort to support worthy causes in the county. But what do the companies—and their stockholders—get out of the deal, wondered reporter Dave Donelson in an article appearing in Westchester business lifestyle magazine 914Inc.

It’s not an idle question. Corporate philanthropy is big business in Westchester and it’s growing more important as nonprofit providers of essential social services face budget cuts from state, county, and municipal governments and declines in giving by private individuals.

How big?

According to Anna-Kay Sinclair of The Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Pace University, there were 971 registered private foundations with assets of over $2.8 billion in the county in 2010. That year, six Westchester-based corporate foundations made up 20 percent of total private foundation revenue—more than $78 million of the $391 million total for the county. The major half-dozen were foundations funded by PepsiCo, Pepsi Bottling Group, IBM, Dannon, Heineken, and MBIA based in Armonk.  

Potential sales growth helps explain what The Wilson Center’s executive director, Rebecca Tekula, PhD, observes: “What I see is less idiosyncratic donations based on the personal interests of the corporate leaders and more social responsibility related to the core business.”

In other words, donations are made not because the CEO likes the opera, but because companies believe it helps build the bottom line.

The Hudson Independent: “Tarrytown Dancer Gets a Kick Being a Rockette”

Lauren Gaul, who teaches contemporary jazz as an adjunct faculty member at Pace University, feels blessed to be a Rockette at the renowned Radio City Christmas Spectacular.

A year-round employee of Radio City Music Hall, Lauren Gaul performed in the annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, the Columbus Day Parade, the America’s Thanksgiving Parade in Detroit, the Amtrak Whistle Stop Tour, and others. As exciting for the dancers as it is for the audience, once their high-stepping season ends in January, she said to Janie Rosman for The Hudson Independent. “We are free to do other things.”

From The Hudson Independent story by Janie Rosman:

This past September, Gaul resumed teaching contemporary jazz at Pace University, specifically in its new degree program –a bachelor of arts in theater arts– with a specialized track in commercial dance.

Spearheaded by choreographer and dance lecturer Rhonda Miller, the program provides specialized training for dance careers in stage, television, and commercials in range and forms, including include ballet, jazz, tap, and hip hop, among others.

“I wanted to have Lauren as an adjunct faculty member alongside me,” said Miller, who hired Gaul in 2007. “She has strong skills and brings a real working environment to the students.”

Gaul’s work as a dancer and choreographer was featured at venues including Broadway Dance Center Performance Outlet, the Bridge for Dance, Jazz Dance World Congress Choreography Event, and most recently at the prestigious Jacob’s Pillow inside/out performance space. Additionally she helped choreograph industrials for Lady Footlocker, Sesame Street, Astra-Zeneca, and IZOD Kids, among others.

Which performers does she admire? “That’s a tough question,” she said initially, then a moment later, “Sylvie Guillem,” she said of the French ballet dancer formerly with the Paris Opera Ballet, now a principal guest artist with the Royal Ballet of London, “and (the late actress and dancer) Gwen Verdon.”

And after the curtain closes on her last season with the Rockettes, whenever that time comes, Gaul will continue teaching dance. “We don’t say the word ‘retire,’” she said. “It’s my dream to help one or more of my students grace the pages of Playbill.”

Ergo her advice to young dancers, who, like the young girl growing up in Pennsylvania did, aspire to join the famous Radio City Music Hall troupe: “Work harder than anyone will ever push you in tap, jazz and ballet.”

Maybe one of her young protégés will join the renowned kick line some day.

SpryLiving: “A New You for the New Year”

It’s January. Time to ring in the New Year. And you have, without a doubt, made a ton of resolutions that for once you vow to finally keep. Know that you have the power to thrive, succeed, and become the individual you desire in 2012—without ever having to totally give up Moon Pies. Pace’s Richard Shadick and John Cronin offer advice in Spry Living’s January issue, reaching 9.5 million readers, on how to make your New Year Better Than Before.

“Yes, we all want to lose weight, eat more vegetables, get fit, drink water instead of white wine, hold fewer grudges, manage our stress, sleep better and help the planet go greener,” writes Jane Wilkens Michael in the January issue of Spry Living

But alas for many of us, our best goals and intentions are forgotten faster than old acquaintenances.  Here are tips that Michael garnered from Pace faculty members John Cronin and Richard Shadick on how to make our resolutions live on after January 1:

Emotional Health

Be realistic—and specific. “Instead of telling yourself, I am going to lose weight and be healthy next year, it is better to say, I will lose five pounds by February 15 by walking for 20 minutes three days a week and no longer drinking soda,” says Dr. Richard Shadick, director of the Counseling Center and adjunct associate professor of psychology at Pace University. The more specific, measurable, and attainable a goal is, the more likely it can be reached.

Giving back

It’s easy being green. “This New Year, resolve to help the planet,” says John Cronin, senior fellow for Environmental Affairs at Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies. “There are two questions I am asked most often: ‘Can one person really make a difference?’ and ‘How?’ The answer to the first is easy: Yes! It is the story of human history — but those who never try to make a difference never do.” Cronin poses a creative challenge: “Look to your own life to find that something special you can make happen. For example, one mechanic adds a dollar to the bill of each of his car repair customers as a donation to the Riverkeeper organization. Over the past 20 years he has directed thousands of dollars to the group, and his customers are delighted. Help your child’s school find environmental experts to speak to classes. Here’s a simple one: Share a fascinating fact, and your friends will spread the information too —how much of the water on our planet is available for drinking? (Answer: Less than 1%). I promise they will be amazed, educated and eager to tell someone else. The point is that in addition to the how-to’s of proper individual behavior, which after 42 Earth Days should be common knowledge by now, there are creative acts you can perform, invent and organize that will change the world right in your own backyard if you are bold enough to try.  Jump right in. The planet is waiting.”

The Star-Ledger: “Will a provision in Obama’s jobs bill to protect the unemployed help? Career experts respond.”

President Obama has proposed passing a law prohibiting discrimination against the jobless. Is this a good idea that will help the jobless find jobs, or are the only people it will help find employment lawyers? Lisa J. Stamatelos, an adjunct professor of human resources management at the Lubin School of Business, gives her thoughts on the pros and cons of this legislation to Lee Miller, Career Columnist of The Star-Ledger.

Buried within President Obama’s proposed $447 billion jobs bill is a provision creating a new category of individuals against whom it will be illegal to discriminate — the unemployed.

There is a near unanimous consensus that failing to consider individuals that are unemployed to fill job vacancies is a bad business decision because there is a wealth of outstanding talent who, through no fault of their own, find themselves unemployed.  A strong argument can also be made that treating these individuals, who are desperately seeking work, as expendable is morally wrong. Just because something is wrong, however, doesn’t necessarily mean that the best way to remedy the problem is to pass a law.

Lisa J. Stamatelos, an adjunct professor of human resources management at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business, describes the proposal as “sounding good in theory, but useless in practice” in Sunday’s edition of The Star-Ledger

“The proposed law would boost the caseload of employment lawyers and put another cost burden on employers of defending themselves against frivolous lawsuits,” she adds. “Being unemployed may also sometimes be a legitimate reason for not hiring someone, if their skills have become antiquated.”

Chatham Courier: “Women’s drive helps canning company thrive”

Professor Bruce Bachenheimer, Director of Entrepreneurship@Lubin, shares insights about starting and growing a business in this tough economic climate.

The Shaker Mountain Canning Co is a women- owned food production and co-packing facility in New Lebanon, N.Y. in Columbia County. They made it through their first year and they said business is increasing.

Lisa Connell, a reporter for the Chatham Courier, reached out to Lubin’s Bruce Bachenheimer — clinical professor of management and the mastermind behind the annual Pace Pitch Contest in which contestants in the New Business Concept and Social Venture categories each have three minutes to make his/her pitch — and asked him:

  • What skills and knowledge does it take to be an entrepreneur, particularly if the owner and staff are female? 
  • What challenges may the woman entrepreneur face that a man does not?
  • Or, is it too simplistic to talk about succeeding as an entrepreneur along gender lines? 

According to Professor Bachenheimer, finding the right people and retaining them can actually be much more of a challenge than the idea for the business itself.

“It’s hard to identify them and even if you do, how do you recruit them?” asked Bachenheimer.  “Attracting, recruiting, training, retraining and delegating — all of these factors are key to an entrepreneurial venture,” Bachenheimer said during a telephone interview.

“It’s about people and innovation and truly growing the business,” he said.

Bloomberg Businessweek: “Executives Teaching in B-School”

Some academic theories might be best understood by the people who put those theories into practice.

Practitioners who teach have their failures as well as their successes on display for students. They also serve as a sounding board for students seeking practical career advice.

Business schools have come to value the practitioner’s perspective, and they are increasingly making room for those viewpoints on their staffs. Bloomberg Businessweek identified 25 top executives who teach/guest lecture, including Neil Braun, Dean of the Lubin School of Business.

Neil Braun: Viacom Entertainment

Who: Chief executive officer, Viacom Entertainment (VIA), 1988-94; president, NBC Television Network, 1994-98
Where: Pace University’s Lubin School of Business
What: Dean, guest lecturer

Braun joined a growing list of former executives tapped to run business schools when he was named dean of Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in June 2010. Braun also flits in and out of the classroom as a guest lecturer. He says he has his most rapt audience any time the discussion topic is M&A negotiations. During his time at Viacom, the company bought Blockbuster and Paramount Pictures. “Students hang on every word when you can tell them what was really going on,” he says of those deals in Bloomberg Businessweek.