News source: Debate on advertising’s role in obesity, health and wellness

Paul Kurnit, clinical professor of marketing at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in New York, has forceful views and diverse experience in the youth marketplace.

October 30, 2007

Contact Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

NEWS SOURCE

Topic: Debate on advertising’s role in obesity, health and wellness

Debates are raging about the role of advertising in obesity, age appropriate messaging and over commercialization of youth.

For example, Senators Sam Brownback and Tom Harkin, along with FCC Chairman Kevin Martin and FCC Commissioners Michael J. Copps and Deborah Taylor Tate, announced the formation of a Task Force on Media and Childhood Obesity to examine the impact of media and advertising on children’s health. According to an article on Broadcasting & Cable online, 9/19/2007, the report from the task force has been “apparently held up by the inability to get children’s activist groups to sign off on it.” http://www.broadcastingcable.com/article/CA6479807.html?rssid=193

Paul Kurnit, clinical professor of marketing at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in New York, has forceful views and diverse experience in the youth marketplace. As a senior executive in the advertising business as President of Griffin Bacal, a DDB agency, he helped build the Hasbro toy and entertainment business and supervised TV programs like Transformers, GI Joe and My Little Pony. In addition to teaching at Pace, he operates his own marketing and consulting businesses, Kurnit Communications and KidShop. He also has worked extensively on “pro-social” initiatives to help young people including youth volunteerism for America’s Promise, founded by Colin Powell, The Partnership for a Drug-Free America, and the Charles and Helen Schwab Foundation’s programs for students with learning difficulties. He serves on the Creative Review Committee of The Advertising Council, the board of directors of the Advertising Educational Foundation and the advisory board of the Children’s Advertising Review Unit.

Professor Kurnit’s views on the role of advertising in obesity:

“Many who criticize advertising to kids misplace blame and oversimplify complex societal issues requiring much more comprehensive solutions to foster youth health and well-being. There has been no link demonstrated between advertising and obesity. Advertising plays a positive role in socializing kids. And, advertising is an important engine for quality entertainment and communication that nurture and nourish kids.”

Contrary to what anti-marketing groups maintain, “I haven’t seen any conclusive data that show kids are damaged by advertising. We live in a commercial world. The issue is to make advertising as responsive and responsible as possible rather than to turn our back on the commercial world we live in. The big opportunity is to harness the power of advertising to encourage positive social movements that will support a future of healthier kids and families.”

Phone: (914) 737-0300; email: pkurnit@pace.edu .

Pace University Study Finds Pomegranate Effective in Fighting Viruses and Bacteria

If the answer to improved health through protection against common germs and pathogens was as simple as drinking pomegranate juice it seems everyone would be a lot healthier.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Cara Halstead, Public Information Officer, Pace University
914-773-3312 Office, 914-906-9680 Cell, chalstead@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY STUDY FINDS PURE POMEGRANATE JUICE AND POMEGRANATE LIQUID EXTRACT EFFECTIVE IN FIGHTING VIRUSES AND BACTERIA

100% Pomegranate juice and POMx liquid extract could significantly reduce microbes found in the mouth that commonly cause cavities, staph infections and food poisoning

NEW YORK, NY, May 22, 2007 – If the answer to improved health through protection against common germs and pathogens was as simple as drinking pomegranate juice it seems everyone would be a lot healthier.

Recent preliminary research by Milton Schiffenbauer, Ph.D., a biology professor at Pace University in New York, indicates it just might be that simple. The research revealed that 100% pomegranate juice and POMx liquid extract (pomegranate polyphenol extract), made from the Wonderful variety of pomegranate grown in California, have antiviral and antibiotic effects. His findings will be introduced May 22 at the American Society for Microbiology’s annual meeting in Toronto in a presentation entitled: “The Inactivation of Virus and Destruction of Bacteria by Pomegranate Juice.”

In this exploratory study, Schiffenbauer tested 100% pomegranate juice and POMx liquid extract and the effect each had on a bacterial virus T1 and several bacteria over various periods of time, in various conditions and with the addition of other ingredients. The titer of T1 virus,(a model system) which infects E.coli B decreased up to 100% within 10 minutes of the addition of 100% pomegranate juice or POMx liquid extract. The research was funded by Pace University and POM Wonderful LLC and was conducted using POM Wonderful pomegranate products.

Both were also found to be effective in the destruction of bacteria S. mutans, known to cause cavities, S. aureus, the most common cause of staph infections, and B. cereus, a common cause of food poisoning. Schiffenbauer’s findings also indicate that 100% pomegranate juice and POMx liquid extract inhibit the spread of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), having widespread implications in the treatment of these potentially pathogenic microorganisms.

The addition of the POM products to various oral agents, including toothpaste and mouthwash, gave these agents an antimicrobial effect.

This work comes on the heels of earlier studies conducted by Schiffenbauer that found that white tea and green tea extracts also have antimicrobial effects. According to Schiffenbauer, pomegranate has gotten even better results than the teas.

About POM Wonderful
POM Wonderful is the largest grower of the Wonderful variety of pomegranate. The company exclusively grows and sells this variety because of its exquisite sweet flavor, health benefits, large size and plentiful juice. POM Wonderful’s pomegranates are grown in Central California, in the sunny San Joaquin Valley. Fresh pomegranates are in season from October through January and November is National Pomegranate Month. In addition to selling the fresh fruit, the company also juices its fresh pomegranates to make POM Wonderful pomegranate juice and POMx. To learn more, visit http://www.pomwonderful.com.

About Pace University
For more than 100 years Pace University has been preparing students to become leaders in their fields by providing an education that combines exceptional academics with professional experience and the New York advantage. Pace has three campuses, in New York City, Westchester, and White Plains. A private metropolitan university, Pace enrolls nearly 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

Pace University to Host Colorful LEGO League Tournament

Twenty-five teams of children, ages 9-14, from New York State and New Hampshire schools, Girl Scout troops and neighborhoods will demonstrate competing ways of building and programming a robot using LEGO sets that address how the health, biodiversity, and productivity of the world’s oceans can be sustained for present and future generations.

Contacts:

Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

or Bernice Houle, Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, Pace University, 914-773-3592, bhoule@pace.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY

February 6, 2006

PACE UNIVERSITY TO HOST 25 TEAMS FROM LOCAL SCHOOLS

IN COLORFUL LEGO LEAGUE TOURNAMENT

This year’s challenge – “Ocean Odyssey”

WHAT: Twenty-five teams of children, ages 9-14, from New York State and New Hampshire schools, Girl Scout troops and neighborhoods will demonstrate competing ways of building and programming a robot using LEGO sets that address how the health, biodiversity, and productivity of the world’s oceans can be sustained for present and future generations.

WHEN: Sunday, February 12, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Opening ceremonies at 12:15 p.m.

WHERE: Pace University, Pleasantville Campus, Goldstein Fitness Center

Media admission by press pass. This event is free and open to the public.

For more information or to volunteer, contact Bernice J. Houle, (914) 773-3592, bhoule@pace.edu .

WHO: Twenty-four teams from NY and one team from NH will compete in the FIRST LEGO League. Eleven teams from NY will compete in the Jr. FIRST LEGO League. At least one all-girl team will compete, including a team formed by the Girl Scout Council of Westchester/Putnam.

The tournament is run entirely by volunteers, including Pace students, staff and faculty. Pace students will serve as referees. Judges are from major corporations in the area, including IBM, T.J. Watson Research Center, Apple Computing, and Evionyx.

The FIRST Organization, founded by inventor Dean Kamen, creator of the Segway Human Transporter, has teamed up with the LEGO Company to create FIRST LEGO League. Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems will host the Lower Hudson FIRST LEGO League Tournament, an annual event that over the last three years has encouraged children to use their imagination, work with LEGO sets, and learn about science and technology in a fun and exciting way. Each year, the tournament has a different internationally announced challenge. This year’s is “Ocean Odyssey.”

Teams will present robotics technology solutions they have researched to perform missions like deploying a submarine, servicing a pipeline, releasing a dolphin, and cleaning up a cargo shipping accident. In addition to the tournament missions, the teams will be judged on robot design and programming, a 10-minute research presentation, and demonstrated teamwork.

This year, the Lower Hudson Tournament is also sponsoring Jr. FIRST LEGO League for 6-9 year olds. Eleven teams from New York State have each been building a model depicting newly-discovered marine life (plant or animal), and a motorized submarine, water vehicle or scuba diver to explore their models and those of others. At the tournament, the teams will connect their base plate to other plates to create a huge underwater scene.

Web sites:

FIRST Organization http://www.usfirst.org/jrobtcs/flego.htm

CSIS at Pace http://csis.pace.edu

White Tea better than green tea?

New studies conducted at Pace University, have indicated that White Tea Extract (WTE) may have prophylactic applications in retarding growth of bacteria that cause Staphylococcus infections, Streptococcus infections, pneumonia and dental caries. The effect of WTE was determined by observing zones of inhibition of bacteria grown on Mueller Hinton II Agar (Kirby-Bauer technique). In regard to bacterial virus inactivation, White Tea was more effective than green tea. Results obtained with the bacterial virus, a model system; suggest that WTE may have an anti-viral effect on human pathogenic viruses. The addition of White Tea Extract to various toothpastes enhanced the anti-microbial effect of these oral agents.

Contact: Mary E. Horgan 914-923-2798 mhorgan@pace.edu

White Tea better than green tea?
NEW STUDY SHOWS THAT WHITE TEA HAS AN INHIBITORY EFFECT ON VARIOUS PATHOGENIC BACTERIA, FUNGI AND BACTERIAL VIRUS.

Anti-Viral and Anti-Bacterial effect of Toothpaste is enhanced by adding White Tea Extract.

New York, NY – May 23, 2004 – New studies conducted at Pace University, have indicated that White Tea Extract (WTE) may have prophylactic applications in retarding growth of bacteria that cause Staphylococcus infections, Streptococcus infections, pneumonia and dental caries. The effect of WTE was determined by observing zones of inhibition of bacteria grown on Mueller Hinton II Agar (Kirby-Bauer technique). In regard to bacterial virus inactivation, White Tea was more effective than green tea. Results obtained with the bacterial virus, a model system; suggest that WTE may have an anti-viral effect on human pathogenic viruses. The addition of White Tea Extract to various toothpastes enhanced the anti-microbial effect of these oral agents.

Studies have also indicated that WTE has an anti-fungal effect on Penicillium chrysogenum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the presence of WTE, Penicillium spores and Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells were totally inactivated. It is suggested that WTE may have an anti-fungal effect on pathogenic fungi.

“Past studies have shown that green tea stimulates the immune system to fight disease,” says Milton Schiffenbauer, Ph.D., a microbiologist and professor in the Department of Biology at Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts & Sciences and primary author of the research. “Our research shows White Tea Extract can actually destroy in vitro the organisms that cause disease. Study after study with tea extract proves that it has many healing properties. This is not an old wives tale, it’s a fact.”

Several findings in the new study are of particular interest:

• The Anti-Viral and Anti-Bacterial effect of white tea (Stash and Templar) is greater than that of green tea.

• The anti-viral and anti-bacterial effect of several toothpastes including, Aim, Aquafresh, Colgate, Crest and Orajel were enhanced by the addition of White Tea Extract.

• White tea extract exhibited an anti-fungal effect on both Penicillium chrysogenum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

• White Tea Extract may have application in the inactivation of pathogenic human microbes, i.e., bacteria, viruses, and fungi.

The results of this study will be presented at the 104th General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology on May 23, New Orleans, Louisiana

Dr. Schiffenbauer can be reached at (212) 346-1968 or mschiffenbauer@pace.edu

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart Airport in New Windsor. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. (www.pace.edu)