NEWS ADVISORY: Pace Students Schedule Candlelight Vigil Tonight at 9PM for Max Moreno, Victim of Fatal Shooting

A candlelight vigil for Max Moreno, the Pace student who last night was victim of a fatal shooting in his off-campus apartment, will take place tonight at 9pm at the plaza in front of Pace’s downtown Manhattan campus, just east of City Hall at the corner of Spruce St. and Park Row/Frankfort St.

The candlelight vigil was covered by DNAinfo.com and the Tribeca Trib
 

A candlelight vigil for Max Moreno, the Pace student who last night was victim of a fatal shooting in his off-campus apartment, has been moved from tomorrow night to tonight because of the weather forecast for tomorrow. The event is sponsored by the Pace University chapter of the Zeta Beta Tau fraternity, to which Moreno belonged. It is scheduled to begin at 9pm at the plaza in front of Pace’s downtown Manhattan campus, just east of City Hall at the corner of Spruce St. and Park Row/Frankfort St.

The story was picked up by the NY Post, NY Daily News, DNAInfo, WPIX and others.

In a letter to the Pace community, President Stephen J. Friedman reported on the tragic death of Moreno.

Dear Pace Faculty, Students and Staff:

With sadness I must inform the Pace Community that late last night a Pace student, Max Moreno, was the victim of a fatal shooting in his off-campus apartment on Gold Street in New York City.

On behalf of all of us I extend deepest sympathies to the family members and friends of Mr. Moreno. Counseling for anyone who is dealing with the emotions of this event is available at the Pace Counseling Center at 212-346-1526, and after hours, a counselor on duty is available through Campus Security.

I urge students and other members of the community with information related to this tragic incident to come forward promptly to either the New York City Police Department, with which we are cooperating fully, or to Campus Security. The First Precinct can be reached at 212-334-0611; Security is 212-346-1800. All information will be treated confidentially.

Sincerely yours,
Stephen J. Friedman

Psychological Impact of College Violence on Israel and U.S. to be Explored in Workshop

Berger will discuss the impact of terrorism on the individual, professional community, society and culture.

Contact: Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

NOTE: Journalists are welcome but must RSVP by contacting Dr. Berger in advance at Riberger@netvision.net.il and agree to ground rules for protecting the confidentiality of participants.

MEDIA ADVISORY

November 9, 2004

PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPACT OF COLLECTIVE VIOLENCE ON ISRAEL AND U.S. TO BE EXPLORED IN WORKSHOP BY INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNIZED EXPERT, TUESDAY, NOV. 9, AT PACE UNIVERSITY

WHO: Rony Berger, PhD, director of community services for Natal – The Israel Trauma Center for Victims of Terror and War. Berger, a clinical psychologist, is an internationally recognized expert in dealing with psychological preparation for and aftermath of terrorist attacks. Berger brings years of experience in work with victims of terrorist attack, emergency relief medical teams, first responders and direct clinical providers.

Berger will discuss the impact of terrorism on the individual, professional community, society and culture. Specific issues will be the effects of living under conditions of uncertainty and ongoing threat on personal security, interpersonal relationships, perceptions of the “other,” and the collective identity. Berger will also present suggestions about how to cope.

WHAT: Pace University workshop: “Society Under Siege: Is there a National Trauma Syndrome?” Over the last decade, increased acts of terrorism around the world, causing immeasurable suffering, have led to unprecedented challenges for understanding the extent and nature of impact and planning effective response. This workshop will explore the psychological impact of collective violence and trauma on Israeli society, the United States and other parts of the world.

WHEN: Tuesday, November 9, 4 to 5:30 p.m.

WHERE: Pace University, One Pace Plaza, Lecture Hall South, New York City.

As a private metropolitan university, Pace has a growing national reputation for offering students opportunity, teaching and learning based on research, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. It is one of the ten founders of Project Pericles, developing education that encourages lifelong participation in democratic processes. Pace has seven campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. Approximately 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu.

Caputo Selected as Leader in Combating Student Substance Abuse

As alcohol, other drug abuse, and incidents of violence continue to plague college and university campuses, a new group of leaders has joined the Presidents Leadership Group of the Center for College Health and Safety (CCHS), a seven-year-old abuse-prevention institution funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACTS
Helen Stubbs, Center for College Health and Safety,
617-618-2366, hstubbs@edc.org
or
Christopher T. Cory, Director of Public Information, Pace University
212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT DAVID A. CAPUTO SELECTED TO SERVE AS NATIONAL LEADER
IN COMBATING STUDENT SUBSTANCE ABUSE

Newton, Mass. and New York, NY, August 26, 2004 — As alcohol, other drug abuse, and incidents of violence continue to plague college and university campuses, a new group of leaders has joined the Presidents Leadership Group of the Center for College Health and Safety (CCHS), a seven-year-old abuse-prevention institution funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Pace University President David A. Caputo is one of six new members announced today, all of whom are committed to making student substance abuse prevention a priority on their campuses. Caputo’s addition brings the presidential group to a total involving 50 campuses in 28 states.

The expansion of the PLG marks the continued CCHS commitment to highlighting and promoting the critical role of presidential leadership in collegiate alcohol and other drug prevention.

New PLG members are chosen based on their previous leadership efforts and plans for future initiatives. Applicants must submit personal statements and letters of support from individuals in their institutions and surrounding communities demonstrating their clear commitment to this issue and their readiness to continue serving as leaders.

As President, Caputo has worked with local law enforcement organizations, sponsored and participated in a wellness program, and appointed a new campus-wide taskforce charged with developing a comprehensive action plan that deals with prevention, education, and treatment. He said, “By joining the Presidents Leadership Group, I look forward to becoming even more involved in the effort to foster student health.”

Caputo joined a group of six new members:

Institution President State
Humboldt State University Rollin Richmond CA
Pace University David A. Caputo NY
Sul Ross State University R. Vic Morgan TX
SUNY Cortland Erik J. Bitterbaum NY
The University of Vermont Daniel Mark Fogel VT
University of New Hampshire Ann Weaver Hart NH

“Presidents are in a unique position to create a positive impact on their campus and community environments regarding issues of student alcohol and other drug use,” stated William DeJong, director of the Center for College Health and Safety. “The Presidents Leadership Group has proven to be an effective vehicle to promote the positive efforts of college and university presidents to address these issues.”

The following presidents and chancellors were previously named to the PLG:

Institution President/Chancellor State
Alvernia College Laurence W. Mazzeno PA
Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania Jessica Kozloff PA
California State University, Bakersfield Tomas A. Arciniega (retired) CA
California State University, Fresno John Welty CA
California State University System Charles B. Reed CA
Central Washington University Jerilyn McIntyre WA
Clarkson College J. W. Upright NE
Coker College B. James Dawson SC
College of Santa Fe Linda Hanson NM
Edgewood College James Ebben WI
Frederick Community College Patricia Stanley MD
Illinois College Axel Steuer IL
Lehigh University Gregory Farrington PA
Miami-Dade Community College, MCC Kathie S. Sigler (retired) FL
North Idaho College Michael Burke ID
Northwest Missouri State University Dean L. Hubbard MO
Prairie View A & M University Charles Hines (retired) TX
Raritan Valley Community College G. Jeremiah Ryan NJ
San Antonio College Robert E. Zeigler TX
San Diego Community College District Augustine Gallego CA
Southeast Missouri State University Kenneth W. Dobbins MO
Southeastern Louisiana University Randy Moffett LA
SUNY, Potsdam John Fallon NY
University at Albany, SUNY Karen Hitchcock (retired) NY
University of Bridgeport Neil Salonen CT
University of California, Santa Barbara Henry Yang CA
University of Delaware David Roselle DE
University of Iowa David J. Skorton IA
University of Kentucky Lee Todd KY
University of Miami Donna Shalala FL
University of Michigan Mary Sue Coleman MI
University of Missouri, Rolla Gary Thomas MO
University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg Frank Cassell PA
University of Puget Sound Susan Pierce (retired) WA
University of Rhode Island Robert Carothers RI
University of San Diego Alice Hayes (retired) CA
University of Virginia John T. Casteen, III VA
University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire Donald J. Mash WI
University of Wyoming William Kirwas MD
Vanderbilt University Gordon Gee TN
Weber State University Paul Thompson (retired) UT
Western Washington University Karen Morse WA

The PLG was formed in 1997. That year, with six members, the PLG published an alcohol prevention report urging college presidents to become active leaders on this issue on their campuses and in their surrounding communities. Copies of the report, Be Vocal, Be Visible, Be Visionary: Recommendations for College and University Presidents on Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention can be obtained by visiting the Center for College Health and Safety’s Web site at www2.edc.org/cchs/plg/products.html.

The Center for College Health and Safety is a part of the Health and Human Development division of Education Development Center, Inc., an internationally known educational research and development organization located in Newton, Mass. CCHS assists colleges and universities in developing, implementing and evaluating prevention policies and programs that address a broad range of health and safety issues at institutions of higher education. The Center also conducts research to expand current knowledge about effective strategies to promote health and prevent alcohol, tobacco, drug use, violence, injuries, and high-risk sexual activity.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university committed to opportunity, teaching and learning based on research, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. It is one of the ten founders of Project Pericles, developing education that encourages lifelong participation in democratic processes. Pace has seven campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. More than 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. Www.pace.edu.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, based in Princeton, N.J., is the nation’s largest philanthropy devoted exclusively to health and health care. It concentrates its grantmaking in four goal areas: to assure that all Americans have access to quality health care at reasonable cost; to improve the quality of care and support for people with chronic health conditions; to promote healthy communities and lifestyles; and to reduce the personal, social and economic harm caused by substance abuse – tobacco, alcohol and illicit drugs.

Additional information is at the CCHS Web site at http://www2.edc.org/cchs/ or available by contacting CCHS via telephone (617-618-2366) or email (cchs@edc.org).

New crusade for cops’ mental health

Although police officers have frequent contact with death, violence and other traumatic experiences, they are generally reluctant to seek the psychological counseling they may need for fear they will be stigmatized by their department and/or assigned to desk duties.

Contact
Christopher T. Cory, Director of Public Information, Pace University
212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Note: Henry gives testimony before New York City Council 9/11 hearing Thursday, April 15, 1:00 PM

POLICE, FIRE AND RESCUE DEPARTMENTS NEED NEW POLICIES
FOR HOLOCAUST-LIKE SYMPTOMS OF SURVIVING DEATH,
SAYS PACE UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR

Vincent E. Henry, former NYPD sergeant, bases advocacy on
new study of officers’ reactions to death trauma,
“Death Work: Police, Trauma and the Psychology of Survival” (Oxford)

New York, NY, April 14, 2004 — Although police officers have frequent contact with death, violence and other traumatic experiences, they are generally reluctant to seek the psychological counseling they may need for fear they will be stigmatized by their department and/or assigned to desk duties.

Many officers mistrust their departments’ intentions toward traumatized cops, the capabilities of department psychologists, and the confidentiality of the services that departments provide.

And the same often goes for other emotionally-wounded first responders like firefighters – and even for workers in “slaughterhouse” industries.

Vincent E. Henry, a retired New York City Police sergeant who earned his Ph.D. in psychology and now teaches criminal justice at Pace University, is out to make employers more compassionate.

For instance, based on research on these little-recognized issues just published in “Death Work: Police, Trauma and the Psychology of Survival” (Oxford University Press), he testifies April 15 at 1:00 PM in the City Hall Committee Room before the New York City Council’s Committee on Mental Health, Mental Retardation, Alcoholism, Drug Abuse and Disability Services’ hearing on “Funding for Post-September 11 Mental Health Services.”

Holocaust and Hiroshima parallels. Henry’s book is largely based on doctoral research supervised by the eminent psychologist and psychiatrist Robert Jay Lifton and completed in May 2001. Henry conducted extensive interviews of 50 cops (including rookies, homicide detectives, crime scene investigators, and officers who killed someone in the line of duty), detailing how death experiences shape their personal and professional lives.

Henry argues that police reactions to death trauma often have a hitherto-unrecognized similarity to patterns that Lifton identified in his classic works on the survivors of Hiroshima, the Holocaust and Vietnam veterans.

First responders, Henry found, exhibit five characteristic psychological themes including “psychic numbing,” “death guilt,” a “death imprint,” “suspicion of the counterfeit,” and a compelling “need to make meaning” of their experience.

Hospice workers, death row staff members. In an introduction to “Death Work,” Lifton says Henry’s findings apply to firefighters and rescue workers of all kinds, military personnel, doctors and health workers (especially in hospices), undertakers, prison staff on death row, and even those working in meatpacking or “slaughterhouse” industries.

Henry, a 21-year veteran of the NYPD, saw his findings played out again on 9/11 — both in himself and in the officers he supervised at Ground Zero in the weeks and months that followed. “Death Work” contains a chapter devoted to the 9/11 experience.

Henry now serves on the board of directors of the New York Disaster Counseling Coalition (NYDCC), whose 300 fully-licensed volunteer clinicians have provided hundreds of first responders and family members with free, confidential psychological services “for as long as it takes” and without a potentially stigmatizing paper trail.

Emotional breakdowns. Henry argues that many police officers, firefighters, and emergency medical service personnel — perhaps especially those who responded on 9/11 — are emotionally hurt by their traumatic experiences, and that their performance can be affected for the worse if they do not come to terms with the death that surrounds them.

He gives vivid examples of pent-up feelings that raise the odds that cops will
· Experience explosive anger, immobilizing fear or other powerful emotions;
· Resort to the use of excessive alcohol or medication;
· Avoid situations or assignments that could trigger upsets (One cop who lost his long-time working partner was reminded of the man several years later, experiencing a physical and emotional breakdown);
· Become increasingly cynical and unproductive (“Why should I go out of my way? I have my own problems to deal with”);
· Become increasingly depressed, withdrawn and isolated, raising the potential for suicidal thoughts or actions; and
· Develop full-blown Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and increase the number of psychological disability retirements and sick absences related to stress.

Trapped under trains. His other efforts to increase understanding of how death trauma affects officers’ lives include formulating model training protocols and giving presentations that
· Help prepare officers to deal with such horrifying and grotesque death events as still-living people trapped under trains who will die when the trains are moved to rescue them and restore service;
· Sensitize officers to the fact that their troubling experiences are actually entirely normal reactions to entirely unnatural events;
· Train officers to recognize — in themselves and in other officers — the behaviors and emotions related to the psychology of survival’s five themes;
· Help prepare officers for the possibility that they may one day take a life in the performance of their duties;
· Provide role plays and other training to help officers deliver death notifications to families more compassionately;
· Provide clinicians and therapists with insights into the realities of death-related police experience, police culture, and the unique dynamics of police families;
· Educate the public and the academic community to the compelling psychological issues officers face as a result of their encounters with death trauma.

He addresses the Psychoanalytic Institute of the Baruch College/CUNY Postgraduate Center for Mental Health on April 30, having addressed the city Police Academy’s annual “Women and Policing” conference March 31. He often is called on by media and police agencies across the nation for his expert opinion on issues related to police trauma and police management. He is creating a curriculum unit for the criminal justice courses he teaches at Pace (which graduates approximately 60 future officers a year), and is thinking about how to share it with those responsible for police-training elsewhere.

Henry argues that dealing with death in a sensible way is important for becoming a truly “good cop.” “It’s just that current police department policies and procedures should not automatically tilt toward relieving traumatized police of their responsibilities,” he says.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university committed to opportunity, teaching and learning, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. It has seven campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. More than 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. Www.pace.edu.

Pace University presents free symposium: Religion and Violence

Within the contemporary situation where men and women of committed faith each claim to have god on their side, this discussion will consider the sources and traditions within religions that encourage and discourage violence. The speakers will consider these topics from their extensive understanding non-theistic teachings of ethical culture.

Contact: Mary Horgan, Pace University, (914) 923-2798, mhorgan@pace.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY

WHAT: Pace University presents free symposium:

Religion and Violence

Within the contemporary situation where men and women of committed faith each claim to have god on their side, this discussion will consider the sources and traditions within religions that encourage and discourage violence. The speakers will consider these topics from their extensive understanding non-theistic teachings of ethical culture.

WHO:
Dr. Lawrence Hundersmarck, philosophy and religious studies, Pace University
Dr. Faiz Kahn M. D., Assistant Iman at the Al-Farah Mosque,
Westbury, Long Island
Rabbi Paulette Gross, Park Avenue Synagogue, New York City
Brother David Carroll, Catholic Near East Welfare Association
Mayo Ji Su Nim, Korean Chogye Temple, Woodside, NY
Bart Worden, Ethical Culture Society of Westchester
Dr. Kusumita Priscilla Perdersen, Chair, Religion Department,
St. Francis College

WHEN: Tuesday, March 25, 3:30-5:15 p.m.

WHERE: Pace University, 861 Bedford Road, Pleasantville
Butcher Suite, 2nd floor, Kessel Campus Center

SPEAKERS:
A professor of philosophy and religious studies at Pace University, Dr. Lawrence Hundersmark has lectured and published nationally and internationally on a wide range of topics within these two disciplines. He has recently lectured at Binghampton University on the topic of violence motivated by religion.

Dr. Faiz Kahn, who holds an MD in emergency and internal medicine, has lectured nationally and internationally on various Islamic topics. He has addressed the New York City police department Community Outreach, the United Nations, International Day of Peace 9/11 Victim Memorial Services and the American Muslim Organization. He has been featured on CBS Eye on America.

Brother David Carroll has served since 1985 as advisor to the Holy See’s Permanent Observer Mission to the United Nations, specializing in Middle East issues, and as Assistant to the Secretary General of the Catholic Nearest Welfare Association.

Dr. Kusumita Pedersen is chair of religious studies at St. Francis College in Brooklyn. She was previously executive director of the project on religion and rights and joint secretary of the Global Forum of Spiritual and Parliamentary Leaders on Human Survival. She has been involved in the global interfaith movement for twenty years, and works in the area of comparative religious ethics, including environmental ethics and interreligious dialogue.

The Center for Religious Studies and The Diversity Team of Pace University are sponsoring the free event which is open to the public.

For more information contact: Dr. Lawrence Hundersmarck at (914) 773-3946.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart Airport in New Windsor. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu.

The V-Day 2002 College Campaign Comes to Pace University

V-Day, the global movement to stop violence against women and girls, is going grassroots and global for V-Day 2002 with a 12-week calendar of events and social action campaigns anchored around Valentine’s Day. Following last year’s sold-out V-Day 2001 benefit at New York City’s Madison Square Garden (which featured a performance of V-Day Founder and Artistic Director Eve Ensler’s play, “The Vagina Monologues,” by 70 of the most notable women of stage and screen), V-Day 2002 will encompass 800 benefit productions of “The Vagina Monologues” in theatres, houses of worship, and college campuses around the world. In cities and provinces from Shanghai, China, to Harlem, NY; Sacramento, CA to Nova Scotia, Canada; from Duluth, MN to Cebu City in the Philippines, an international chorus of voices will rise up to entertain and empower, as women live out V-Day’s mission to stop violence against women and girls.

THE V-DAY 2002 COLLEGE CAMPAIGN COMES TO PACE UNIVERSITY WITH A V-DAY BENEFIT PERFORMANCES OF “THE VAGINA MONOLOGUES”
AT
THE KESSEL CAMPUS CENTER, PLEASANTVILLE
ON TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 3:30 P.M.
AND
THE MICHAEL SCHIMMEL CENTER FOR THE ARTS
ON THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 6:00 P.M.

V-DAY,
THE GLOBAL MOVEMENT TO STOP VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN AND GIRLS, IS GOING GRASSROOTS AND GLOBAL IN 2002
WITH 800 V-DAY BENEFITS WORLDWIDE

NEW YORK: -V-Day, the global movement to stop violence against women and girls, is going grassroots and global for V-Day 2002 with a 12-week calendar of events and social action campaigns anchored around Valentine’s Day. Following last year’s sold-out V-Day 2001 benefit at New York City’s Madison Square Garden (which featured a performance of V-Day Founder and Artistic Director Eve Ensler’s play, “The Vagina Monologues,” by 70 of the most notable women of stage and screen), V-Day 2002 will encompass 800 benefit productions of “The Vagina Monologues” in theatres, houses of worship, and college campuses around the world. In cities and provinces from Shanghai, China, to Harlem, NY; Sacramento, CA to Nova Scotia, Canada; from Duluth, MN to Cebu City in the Philippines, an international chorus of voices will rise up to entertain and empower, as women live out V-Day’s mission to stop violence against women and girls.

As part of the V-Day 2002 College Campaign, the ground-breaking, Obie Award-winning “The Vagina Monologues” is coming to Pace University’s Kessel Campus Center in Pleasantville on February 12 at 3:30 P. M> and the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts in New York City on Thursday, February 14 at 6:00 p.m. Pace University’s Women’s and Gender Studies program sponsors the V-Day 2002 performances.

V-Day Pace University 2002 contributions will be accepted at the door.

What is V-Day?
V-Day is a global movement that helps anti-violence organizations throughout the world continue and expand their core work while drawing public attention to the larger fight to stop worldwide violence (including rape, battery, incest, female genital mutilation (FGM), sexual slavery) against women and girls.

· Somewhere in America a woman is battered, usually by her intimate partner, every 15 seconds. (United Nations Study on the Status of Women, 2000)
· More than 130 million girls and women worldwide have been subjected to female genital cutting, and a further two million girls are at risk. (World Health Organization, 1997)
· From 1993-1998, women ages 16 to 24 experienced the highest per capita rates of intimate violence (19.6 per 1,000 women). (“Intimate Partner Violence,” Bureau of Justice Statistics, May 2000)
· Domestic violence occurs in approximately 25-33% of same-sex relationships. (NYC Gay and Lesbian Anti-Violence Project, October 1996)

V-Day is also a day (on or around Valentine’s Day in February), for which annual theatrical and artistic events are produced around the world to transform consciousness, raise money, and revitalize the spirit of existing anti-violence organizations. Each year, V-Day promotes a series of innovative productions, events and initiatives that are identified collectively as V-Day and the year (i.e. V-Day 2001, V-Day 2002, V-Day 2003…).

Since its launch in 1998, V-Day has awarded close to $4 million to grassroots, national and international organizations and programs that work to stop violence against women and girls. The money comes from commercial performances of “The Vagina Monologues,” individuals, corporations, foundations and product sales. Awardees are chosen and funds are distributed annually, in or around the month of February. V-Day is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization.

THE V-DAY COLLEGE CAMPAIGN
For the V-Day College Campaign – the longest-running and most far-reaching of V-Day’s global campaigns, colleges and universities around the world are invited to present benefit productions of “The Vagina Monologues” on their campuses on or around V-Day (Valentine’s Day) to raise awareness and money to stop violence against women and girls. The proceeds from these events go back into the schools’ communities to local organizations and programs already working to stop this violence. College Campaign productions are NON-commercial, NON-professional productions; they are primarily student-run, student-directed and student-performed. One of the goals of the College Campaign is to empower young people – the leaders, shapers and messengers of the future.

In the first three years of its existence, the V?Day College Campaign was presented at more than 450 schools, raised more than $1 million for local organizations, and brought the V-Day message of stopping violence against women and girls to more than 40 million people worldwide. Cornell, Leeds (England) and Friedrich Schiller (Germany) Universities and Middlebury (Ms. Ensler’s alma mater), Mills and Anyajua Comprehensive (Cameroon) Colleges were among the hundreds of schools that participated in the V?Day 2001 College Campaign. Pace University, Drew, Rice and Mount Allison (Canada) Universities and Hamilton and Marist Colleges are among the 550 schools that are on board with the V?Day 2002 College Campaign this year. For the list of participating schools to date, go to http://www.vday.org/college.

V-Day 2002 sponsors and marketing partners
To date, V-Day’s 2002 corporate sponsors include Tampax, Marie Claire, Liz Claiborne and Lifetime Television. V-Day’s 2002 marketing partners include Eziba (V-Day’s exclusive retailer: http://www.eziba.com/vday), Vosges Haut-Chocolat, and Karen Neuburger (V-Day pajamas).

Round-the-clock and up-to-the-minute information about V?Day – its mission, global campaigns, grassroots initiatives and special events – can be found at http://www.vday.org. V-Day Media can be reached via email at press@vday.org.

What are “The Vagina Monologues”?
Hailed by The New York Times as “funny” and “poignant” and by the Daily News as “intelligent” and “courageous,” “The Vagina Monologues” dives into the mystery, humor, pain, power, wisdom, outrage and excitement buried in women’s experiences. Based on interviews with a diverse group of hundreds of women – from a Long Island antiques dealer to a Bosnian refugee – “The Vagina Monologues” brazenly explores questions often pondered, but seldom asked. Ms. Ensler has performed the play to great acclaim throughout the world – from Zagreb to Santa Barbara, from London to Seattle, from Jerusalem to Oklahoma City. Villard Books/Random House published “The Vagina Monologues,” which includes a foreword by Gloria Steinem, in February 1998. A special V?Day edition of the play, including two new sections about the College Campaign, was released in February 2001.

V-Day Pace University 2002
The V-Day Pace University production of “The Vagina Monologues” will be performed at the Pleasantville campus, Kessel Campus Center, Dining room A, at 3:30 P.M on February 12. The New York City production will be held at, The Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts on Spruce and Gold Streets at 6:00 P.M. on February 14. Recommended donations are $5, $2 for students with ID and will be accepted at the door. For more information call: Dorothee von Huene Greenberg in Pleasantville at (914) 772-2957 or Sid Ray in New York City at (212) 346-1289.

Program on Gun Violence to be Held at Pace Law School, October 2

The Public Interest Law Students’ Organization at Pace Law School will mark the annual observance of FIRST MONDAY with a program, “Unite to End Gun Violence,” in support of a national campaign to reduce gun violence, sponsored by the Alliance for Justice and Physicians for Social Responsibility. The event will be held on Monday, October 2, at 12:30 p.m. and again at 4:15p.m., in the Tudor Room, Preston Hall, on the Law School’s campus in White Plains.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637

Contact: Alta Levat
(914) 422-4128
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. – The Public Interest Law Students’ Organization at Pace Law School will mark the annual observance of FIRST MONDAY with a program, “Unite to End Gun Violence,” in support of a national campaign to reduce gun violence, sponsored by the Alliance for Justice and Physicians for Social Responsibility. The event will be held on Monday, October 2, at 12:30 p.m. and again at 4:15p.m., in the Tudor Room, Preston Hall, on the Law School’s campus in White Plains.

Every day, more than 80 people, 10 of them under the age of 20, die from gun violence in America. This startling statistic is examined in the documentary film, AMERICA: UP IN ARMS, which will be shown during the Pace program. At 4:15 p.m., speakers from Million Mom March will comment on the film, and Gary Brown, of the New York State Attorney General’s Office, will speak about the Attorney General’s effort to hold gun manufacturers accountable in civil damages action.

For more information, please contact Erika Dedrich at (914) 422-4136.

First Monday is an annual, national initiative that seeks to inspire and mobilize a new generation of advocates to further the cause of justice. This year’s campaign is focused on reducing gun violence. Hundreds of events will be held on campuses and in communities nationwide anchored on the short documentary film, AMERICA: UP IN ARMS, directed by award-winning filmmakers Liz Garbus and Rory Kennedy. The film will present the epidemic of gun violence in America and provide examples of successful activism by citizens from all walks of life.

The start date for the national First Monday campaign is chosen to correspond to the first day of the new United States Supreme Court term, which always begins on the first Monday in October.

For more information about First Monday, to see a preview of the documentary film, or to learn more about the national campaign to reduce gun violence, visit the website of the Alliance for Justice at http://www.firstmonday2000.com

Founded in 1976, Pace Law School is located in White Plains, NY, 20 miles north of New York City. The School offers the J.D. program for full-time, and part-time day and evening students. Its post-graduate program includes the LL.M. and S.J.D. degrees in environmental Law and the LL.M. in Comparative Legal Studies. Pace has one of the nation’s top-rated environmental law programs and its Clinical Education Program also is nationally ranked, offering clinics in domestic violence prosecution, securities arbitration, environmental litigation, appellate advocacy, and disability law.

New York State Summit on Children Exposed to Violence to be Held at Pace Law School, May 3

U.S. Deputy Attorney General Eric Holder Jr., and NY State Lt. Governor Mary O. Donohue will join experts from mental health and medicine, education, social services, law enforcement, criminal justice, domestic violence, and community and political leadership at the First New York State Summit on Children Exposed to Violence, Wednesday, May 3rd from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM at Pace Law School, White Plains, N.Y

Contact: Cheri Fein
(212) 843-8019
Rubenstein Associates Inc.

Children’s Mental Health Alliance Hosts Summit In Collaboration With The U.S. Department Of Justice in Response to President Clinton’s Children Exposed to Violence Initiative
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. — U.S. Deputy Attorney General Eric Holder Jr., and NY State Lt. Governor Mary O. Donohue will join experts from mental health and medicine, education, social services, law enforcement, criminal justice, domestic violence, and community and political leadership at the First New York State Summit on Children Exposed to Violence, Wednesday, May 3rd from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM at Pace Law School, White Plains, N.Y.

James Garbarino will speak on Foundations of Violence Prevention.

Other topics include:

· School violence prevention
· Breaking the cycle of domestic abuse
· Justice for foster children
· Child advocacy centers
· Supervised visitation
· A total community response to violence prevention

EVENT: First NY State Summit on Children Exposed to Violence

WHEN: Wednesday, May 3rd — 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM

· Eric Holder Speaks: 9:40 – 10:25 AM
· News Conference: 10:30 – 11:00 AM
· Mary Donohue Speaks: 2:00 PM

PLACE: Pace Law School, 78 North Broadway, White Plains, NY

STREAMING VIDEO: www.law.pace.edu/nysummit

Pace Law School Symposium to Focus on Preventing Weapons Violence in Schools, March 30

The Feb. 29 fatal shooting of a first grader by a six-year-old classmate in Lansing, Mich., has re-ignited the issue of school violence in the United States. This tragedy, along with recent school shootings in Conyers, Ga., Littleton, Colo., Springfield, Ore., Jonesboro, Ark., and West Paducah, Ky., has communities around the nation asking, “Can we prevent a devastating act of weapons violence from happening here?” To address this question, Pace Law School will sponsor a symposium to focus on current violence-prevention measures, including tougher gun laws, student searches and seizures, liability lawsuits against gun manufacturers, and other legal solutions.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637

Contact: Alta Levat
(914) 422-4128
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. – The Feb. 29 fatal shooting of a first grader by a six-year-old classmate in Lansing, Mich., has re-ignited the issue of school violence in the United States. This tragedy, along with recent school shootings in Conyers, Ga., Littleton, Colo., Springfield, Ore., Jonesboro, Ark., and West Paducah, Ky., has communities around the nation asking, “Can we prevent a devastating act of weapons violence from happening here?” To address this question, Pace Law School will sponsor a symposium to focus on current violence-prevention measures, including tougher gun laws, student searches and seizures, liability lawsuits against gun manufacturers, and other legal solutions.

The symposium, titled “Preventing Weapons Violence in Schools: Legal Strategies and Remedies,” will be held on Thursday, March 30 from 3-8 p.m., on Pace Law School’s White Plains campus, 78 North Broadway, and is co-sponsored by the Pace Law Review and the Pace Health Law Society. The media is invited to attend. The program will be broadcast live over the Internet on the Pace Law School website at http://www.law.pace.edu. For more information, or to register for the Internet simulcast, call Kate Ryan at (914) 422-4266 or email kryan@law.pace.edu.

Each speaker will have 30 minutes to discuss school violence issues, followed by a question and answer period. Speakers will include:

· Stephen Bates Billick, M.D., clinical associate professor of psychiatry at New York Medical College in Valhalla, N.Y. Dr. Billick is a frequent presenter on child and adolescent psychiatry issues, including juvenile violence.

· Stephen Phillip Sullivan, M.D., of the Department of Psychiatry at St. Vincent’s Hospital in New York City.

· Victoria J. Dodd, professor of law, Suffolk University Law School. Professor Dodd specializes in the fields of education law and constitutional law and is currently the Chair of the Law and Education Section of the Association of American Law Schools.

· Kirsten Rowe, Esq., National Riffle Association Institute for Legislative Action. Rowe is a federal liaison with the National Rifle Association of America’s Institute for Legislative Action.

· Elisa Barnes, Esq., was named 1999 Trial Lawyer of the Year by the Trial Lawyers for Public Justice Foundation for her work on Hamilton v. Accu-Tek, in which a jury held gun manufacturers liable on a novel theory of market share liability.

· John F. Renzulli, Esq., Renzulli & Rutherford, LLP. Renzulli is national counsel to manufacturers, importers and retailers of firearms and ammunition.

· U.S. Congresswoman Nita M. Lowey (schedule permitting), 18th Congressional District of New York.

The symposium is co-sponsored by the Pace Law Review and the Health Law Society at Pace Law School. Edited and published by law students, the Pace Law Review is devoted to the study and publication of scholarly materials of professional legal interest. Each issue contains articles by law faculty, practitioners, and distinguished jurists, as well as student notes and comments on complex legal issues, recent case decisions, and current legislation.

The Health Law Society is a student-run organization advised by Professor Linda C. Fentiman, director of Pace University’s Health Law and Policy Program. Its activities include presenting speakers who discuss timely health law topics, publishing a health law newsletter, and assisting in professional health law meetings.

Founded in 1976, Pace Law School has nearly 5,000 graduates throughout the country. It offers full-time and part-time day and evening J.D. programs on its White Plains, New York, campus. The Law School, which has one of the nation’s top-rated environmental law programs, offers the master of laws and the doctor of juridical science degrees in that field. The School also offers the LL.M. in Comparative Legal Studies. Beginning in the fall of 2000, Pace Law School will begin offering online courses in health law to attorneys around the nation. The Law School is part of Pace University, a comprehensive, independent and diversified University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County.

Pace University to Provide Live Satellite Coverage of White House Conference on School Safety, Oct. 15

Pace University will provide satellite coverage of the “White House Conference on School Safety: Causes and Prevention of Youth Violence,” on Thursday, Oct. 15, in Miller Hall on the University’s Pleasantville, N.Y., campus. Live coverage will be from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., and will include President Clinton’s remarks. The media is invited to attend.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637

Academic Experts on Hand to Provide Comments about the Program

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. – Pace University will provide satellite coverage of
the “White House Conference on School Safety: Causes and Prevention of
Youth Violence,” on Thursday, Oct. 15, in Miller Hall on the University’s
Pleasantville, N.Y., campus. Live coverage will be from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.,
and will include President Clinton’s remarks. The media is invited to attend.

The daylong program at the White House will include an important policy address
by the President and panel discussions that will explore best practices and model
school safety strategies. The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention,
in partnership with the Safe and Drug-Free Schools Program of the Department of
Education, is sponsoring satellite coverage of the event. Pace University is the
only site in Westchester County airing the broadcast.

The program is sponsored locally by the departments of criminal justice and public
administration in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences at Pace University in
Westchester. Experts from various academic disciplines will be on hand to provide
comments about the program.

The program is designed for a cross section of the community, including teachers,
school leaders, parents, judges, prosecutors, state and local juvenile justice agency
representatives, drug prevention specialists, law enforcement officials, youth services
providers, and juvenile probation officers.

Pace University is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York
City and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate,
graduate and professional degree programs.