Urban School Reform to be Theme of Eighth Annual Educators’ Lecture Series at Pace

Some of the nation’s most challenging advocates of urban school reform will present at Pace University’s School of Education’s 8th annual distinguished educators’ lecture series “Beyond Closing the Achievement Gap: The Next Level of Urban School Reform.”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Cara Cea, Pace University, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

Arthur Maloney, EdD, Pace School of Education, 212-346-1347, amaloney@pace.edu

Note: Photos are available of most participants on request

TOUGH ISSUES IN URBAN SCHOOLS TO BE DISCUSSED BY NATIONAL REFORMERS IN 2010 EDITION OF POPULAR AFTER-SCHOOL LECTURE SERIES AT PACE

Bill Ayers, University of Illinois distinguished professor who became issue in Obama campaign, to give final talk.

“Beyond Closing the Achievement Gap: The Next Level of Urban School Reform” to be theme of well-attended public sessions held after school near City Hall.

NEW YORK, NY – Some of the nation’s most challenging advocates of urban school reform will present at Pace University’s School of Education’s 8th annual distinguished educators’ lecture series “Beyond Closing the Achievement Gap: The Next Level of Urban School Reform.”

The schedule is as follows:

March 10 – Theresa Perry, a national expert in social identities and African American achievement;

March 17 – George Wood, instrumental in the opening of 80 new small high schools in urban Ohio;

March 24 – Tony Wagner, Tony Wagner, Harvard educator who discusses a global achievement gap between teaching and job needs;

April 21 – Bill Ayers, a proponent for teaching for social justice.

Ayers, whose name became national news because of his work with Barak Obama on educational issues in Chicago, was a co-founder of the Weather Underground during the Vietnam war era.

Full houses

The lectures are presented from 6-8 pm after the school day to accommodate educators; the series regularly fills Pace’s Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts in downtown Manhattan. The center is east of City Hall, entrance on Spruce Street between Gold and Park Row. The lectures are free and open to the public. Media admission by press pass.

Due to the series’ popularity, those outside the city can view the sessions through streaming live video at the Dutchess County Board of Cooperative Educational Services at 5 BOCES Road in Poughkeepsie, 845-486-4800.

Over the years the series has drawn virtually every eminent U.S. voice for improvement in elementary and secondary schools.

More information on the series is available at http://www.pace.edu/page.cfm?doc_id=8403 or from professor Arthur Maloney at (212) 346-1512 or amaloney@pace.edu.

The complete lineup of topics:

March 10

Theresa Perry, Ph.D.

Simmons College

“Towards a New Conversation about the Achievement and Development of African American Youth”

At the heart of Perry’s theory is the centuries-old belief among African Americans that education means liberation. She will argue that misunderstanding, misuse of resources, and misplaced sentiments are challenges in African American achievement. Perry is a Professor of Africana Studies and Education at Simmons College and director of The Race, Education and Democracy Lecture and Book Series, a collaborative effort of Simmons College and Beacon Press. Perry received her master’s degree in theology from Marquette and her doctorate in education from Harvard University.

March 17

George Wood, Ph.D.

Forum for Education and Democracy

“From a Culture of Testing to a Community of Learning”

Wood is Executive Director of The Forum for Education and Democracy and principal of Federal Hocking High School in Stewart, Ohio. Wood writes an education blog for the Forum at http://forumforeducation.org/blogs/george-wood. Referring to the “5,000 hours” that students spend in high school, he says on the blog that “America has an obligation to every child that this time is challenging, engaging, and enriching” and that the “most fundamental purpose of public education is to prepare our children to take their place as citizens in our democracy.” Federal Hocking is a rural school in Appalachian Ohio which has been recognized as a Coalition of Essential Schools Mentor School, a First Amendment School, and as one of America’s 100 Best by Readers’ Digest. Wood also directed the Ohio High School Transformation Initiative’s Small School Leadership Institute that opened 80 new small high schools were opened in the urban areas of Ohio. Wood has authored several books including Time To Learn, Schools that Work, and Many Children Left Behind (with Deborah Meier).

March 24

Tony Wagner, Ed.D.

Harvard Graduate School of Education

“The Global Achievement Gap”

In a Q&A on the Harvard Graduate School of Education web site, Wagner discusses his most recent book, “The Global Achievement Gap: Why Even Our Best Schools Don’t Teach The New Survival Skills Our Children Need–and What We Can Do About It,” in which he defines the concept in the title as “the gap between what we are teaching and testing in our schools, even in the ones that are most highly-regarded, versus the skills all students will need for careers, college, and citizenship in the 21st century.” In the book Wagner argues that the gap should be grabbed by business leaders to guide a much-needed conversation with educators. Wagner is co-director of the Change Leadership Group (CLG) at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and is a faculty member of the Executive Leadership Program for Educators at the school. He has been senior advisor to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation for the past eight years, first executive director of Educators for Social Responsibility; project director for the Public Agenda Foundation in New York; and President and CEO of the Institute for Responsive Education. He earned his Master’s in teaching and doctorate in education at Harvard.

April 21

William Charles “Bill” Ayers, Ph.D.

University of Illinois at Chicago College of Education

“Problems and Possibilities for Democratic School Reform”

Ayers is an American elementary education theorist focused on education reform, curriculum, and instruction. He is a Distinguished Professor of Education and Senior University Scholar in the College of Education at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He has authored several books on education, including “The Good Preschool Teacher: Six Teachers Reflect on Their Lives” (1989), “To Teach: The Journey of a Teacher” (1993), and “Teaching for Social Justice: A Democracy and Education Reader” (1998). Ayers earned his bachelor’s degree in American studies from The University of Michigan and his doctorate in curriculum and teaching from Bank Street College of Education.

About Pace University

For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, Pace enrolls nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

Visit Pace at Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube; follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

All-stars of Public School Reform Speak at Pace

Some of the nation’s most influential advocates of urban school reform will appear beginning on February 13 in the Pace University School of Education’s sixth annual lecture series, “The Current Status of Urban School Reform: What is Real?”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Cara Halstead Cea, Pace University, 914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu
Arthur Maloney, EdD, Pace School of Education, 212-346-1347, amaloney@pace.edu

ALL-STARS OF PUBLIC SCHOOL REFORM
TO SPEAK AT PACE UNIVERSITY

School of Education Presents Sixth Annual Distinguished Educators Lecture Series
On “What Is Real” in Urban School Reform

Kozol, Ravitch, Meier to appear

NEW YORK, NY – Some of the nation’s most influential advocates of urban school reform will appear beginning on February 13 in the Pace University School of Education’s sixth annual lecture series, “The Current Status of Urban School Reform: What is Real?”

The series, presented from 6-8 pm after the school day, has developed a large following that regularly fills Pace’s Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts in downtown Manhattan and over the years has drawn virtually every eminent voice for improvement in elementary and secondary schools.

This year’s stellar lineup includes Diane Ravitch, sometimes described as “a thorn in the side of the US Department of Education,” presenting a critical look at school reform in New York City; the best-selling, award-winning author and educator Jonathan Kozol who is currently influencing Senate leadership to radically revise the punitive aspects of No Child Left Behind; and Deborah Meier, the grandmother of the current effort to carve out “small” schools within big-city systems who has successfully created a dozen of them herself serving predominantly low-income students.

The Schimmel Center for the Arts is part of Pace University’s downtown Manhattan campus East of from City Hall, entrance on Spruce Street. The lectures are free and open to the public. Media admission by press pass. Westchester residents can view the series in White Plains via simulcast in the 2nd floor auditorium at Pace’s Lubin Graduate Center, One Martine Ave. The complete schedule:

February 13 – “Who Will Teach Urban Children?”
Susan Moore Johnson, EdD, Harvard Graduate School of Education
Susan Moore Johnson has studied the leadership of superintendents, the effects of collective bargaining on schools, the use of incentive pay plans for teachers, and the school as a context for adult work. She is the Pforzheimer professor of teaching and learning at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, where she served as academic dean from 1993 to 1999. She studies and teaches organizational change, teacher policy, and administrative practice. A former high school teacher and administrator, she is director of The Project on the Next Generation of Teachers, which examines how to best recruit, support, and retain a strong teaching force in the next decade. She is the author of numerous articles and books, including Finders and Keepers: Helping New Teachers Survive and Thrive in Our Schools (Jossey-Bass, 2004).

February 20 – “Learning to Teaching in an Era of Accountability: What’s Social Justice Got to Do with It?”
Marilyn Cochran-Smith, PhD, Lynch School of Education, Boston College
Marilyn Cochran-Smith is a nationally and internationally known scholar and frequent keynote lecturer on issues related to teacher quality, teacher preparation, research on teaching, and teacher education. She is currently a member of the National Research Council’s committee on teacher education, which is sponsored by the National Academy of Sciences and was charged by Congress to study the state of teacher education in the U.S.; she served on the National Institute of Education’s International Advisory Panel in 2007 and was co-chair of the American Educational Research Association’s National Panel on Research and Teacher Education, whose report, Studying Teacher Education, was published in 2005 and received AACTE’s Best Publication award.

Cochran-Smith holds the John E. Cawthorne Millennium Chair in Teacher Education for Urban Schools and directs the Doctoral Program in Curriculum and Instruction at Boston College’s Lynch School of Education. She earned her PhD in Language and Education from the University of Pennsylvania in 1982. She was the 2005 president of the American Educational Research Association and received AERA’s 2007 Relating Research to Practice Award for her book, Practice, Policy and Politics in Teacher Education (Corwin Press, 2006), a collection of 30 editorials written between 2000–2006 when she was the editor of the Journal of Teacher Education. She was the inaugural holder of the C.J. Koh Endowed Chair at the National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University in Singapore in 2006. Four of her six books have won national awards.

March 12 – “School Reform in New York City: A Critical Evaluation”
Diane Ravitch, PhD, Steinhardt School of Education, New York University
Diane Ravitch wrote her latest book with her husband, Michael Ravitch –The English Reader: What Every Literate Person Needs to Know (Oxford University Press, 2006. Currently she is research professor of Education at New York University and a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University and the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. She was assistant secretary of Education and counselor to Secretary of Education Lamar Alexander in the administration of President George H.W. Bush, when she led the federal effort to promote the creation of state and national academic standards.

Before entering government service, she was adjunct professor of History and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. She has authored and edited several books, has written more than 400 articles and reviews for scholarly and popular publications, and has lectured in Poland, the former Czechoslovakia, the Czech Republic, Romania, the former Soviet Union, Hungary, the former Yugoslavia, Germany, Japan, Nicaragua, and throughout the United States. She has received dozens of prestigious awards and honors. She earned a BA from Wellesley College in 1960, a PhD in history from Columbia University in 1975, and has been awarded honorary degrees by Williams College, Reed College, Amherst College, the State University of New York, Ramapo College, Saint Joseph’s College of New York, Middlebury College Language Schools, and Union College.

March 26 – Jonathan Kozol, Author and Activist
Jonathan Kozol, author of the best-selling Death at an Early Age, received a summa cum laude degree in English literature from Harvard in 1958, after which he was awarded a Rhodes scholarship to Oxford University. During the civil rights campaigns of 1964 and 1965, he moved from Harvard Square into a poor black neighborhood of Boston and became a fourth grade teacher in the Boston public schools. He has devoted the subsequent four decades to issues of education and social justice in America. His books, including Death at an Early Age (Houghton Mifflin, 1967), Rachel and Her Children: Homeless Families in America (Crown, 1988), Amazing Grace: The Lives of Children and the Conscience of a Nation (Crown, 1995), The Shame of the Nation: The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America (Crown, 2005), and Letters to a Young Teacher (Crown, 2007), have sold millions, appeared on the New York Times best-seller lists, and have received dozens of prestigious awards, including the National Book Award in Science, Philosophy, and Religion, the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award, the Conscience in Media Award of the American Society of Journalists and Authors, the New England Book Award, and the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award.

When he is not with teachers in their classrooms or speaking to future teachers, Kozol is likely to be found in Washington, where he devotes considerable time to what he calls his “lifelong efforts at remediation” of the members of the U.S. House and Senate, attempting to convince the Senate leadership to radically revise the punitive aspects of No Child Left Behind.

April 16 – “What’s the Big Fuss All About? What’s at Stake in the Latest Round of Educational Reform? A View from the Bottom”
Deborah Meier, Educational Reformer, Writer and Activist
Steinhardt School of Education, New York University
Deborah Meier, the grandmother of the “small schools” movement currently underway in the public schools of New York City, most recently wrote Many Children Left Behind: How the No Child Left Behind Act is damaging our children and our schools (Beacon Press, 2004). She is on the faculty of New York University’s Steinhardt School of Education as senior scholar and adjunct professor, a board member and director of New Ventures at Mission Hill, director and advisor to Forum for Democracy and Education, and on the Board of The Coalition of Essential Schools. A recipient of the prestigious MacArthur Fellowship in 1987, she has dedicated her life to successfully redesigning the reform of failing city schools and created a dozen new small schools serving predominantly low-income students. She attended Antioch College and received an MA in History from the University of Chicago. She has received honorary degrees from Bank Street College of Education, Brown, Bard, Clark, Teachers College of Columbia University, Dartmouth, Harvard, Hebrew Union College, Hofstra, The New School, Lesley College, SUNY Albany, Umass Lowell, and Yale. A learning theorist, Meier encourages new approaches that enhance democracy and equity in public education. Her other books include The Power of Their Ideas, Lessons to America from a Small School in Harlem (Beacon Press, 1995), Will Standards Save Public Education (Beacon Press, 2000), In Schools We Trust (Beacon Press, 2002), Keeping School: Letters To Families From Principals Of Two Small Schools, with Ted and Nancy Sizer (Beacon Press, 2004).

Pace University is a partner in one of New York City’s new “small schools,” Pace High School, on the lower East Side. For more than 100 years the University has been preparing students to become leaders in their fields by providing an education that combines exceptional academics with professional experience and the New York advantage. Pace has three campuses, in New York City, Westchester, and White Plains. A private metropolitan university, Pace enrolls nearly 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Law, School of Education, Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

dditional Funding Not the Sole Answer for Urban Schools, says Pace Professor and Author

More funding for urban schools is only half the way to fix them, according to Barry A. Gold, PhD., an expert on organizational change who is Associate Professor of Management at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business and author of a just-published study of recent school finance changes in New Jersey, Still Separate And Unequal: Segregation And The Future Of Urban School Reform (Teachers College Press, 2007).

Contact: Cara Halstead Cea, Pace University Public Information, 914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu, or Barry Allen Gold, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Management, Lubin School of Business, Pace University, bgold@pace.edu

Pace University Management Professor available for comment on Increased New York City School Funding

Additional Funding Not the Sole Answer for Urban Schools, says Author of New Book

New research, also weighing No Child Left Behind, supports planned diversity, tactic at issue in US Supreme Court case to be decided this spring

More funding for urban schools is only half the way to fix them, according to Barry A. Gold, PhD., an expert on organizational change who is Associate Professor of Management at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business and author of a just-published study of recent school finance changes in New Jersey, Still Separate And Unequal: Segregation And The Future Of Urban School Reform (Teachers College Press, 2007).

Gold’s research shows that to improve educational opportunity for urban students, teachers need to teach them the same way suburban students are taught. Moreover, some form of integration is necessary.

Gold documents and analyzes the implementation of the first four years of the landmark 1998 New Jersey Supreme Court Abbott V ruling and the first three years of the 2002 federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) act. In four high-poverty, low-achievement urban elementary schools in New Jersey, these unprecedented reforms proposed to change all elements of the schools except their population characteristics — two were African American and two were Latino. Hence a related but more important research question was: Can separate education be equal? According to Gold, the answer is still no.

Gold found that teaching and learning did not improve and, in many cases, became less effective. This was primarily because administrators and teachers rejected the reforms or modified them to fit their idea of appropriate education for urban students, which as they understand it is different than the kind that suits suburban students. By focusing on test scores, in a powerful example of an unintended consequence NCLB actually increased the use of ineffective teaching methods—rote drill and obsessive reiteration of “the basics”—that often are used in the urban education that the Abbott V mandates tried to change.

According to Gold, the lingering socio-cultural ecology of segregation, which Abbott V and NCLB did not try to alter, insidiously reproduced the less effective kind of urban education.

In June 2007, the United States Supreme Court will rule on the use of planned diversity to achieve racial balance in public schools. The January 8, 2007 edition of the NPR program “Justice Talking” <http://www.justicetalking.com/viewprogram.asp?progID=580> is an excellent debate on the complex issues. Still Separate and Unequal: Segregation and the Future of Urban School Reform supports planned diversity to improve equality of educational opportunity, particularly under the conditions of extreme segregation that characteristic of most metropolitan regions in the United States.

CUMU International Conference Urban and Metropolitan America – The New Realities

10th Annual International Conference of the Coalition of Urban and Metropolitan Universities (CUMU): “Urban and Metropolitan America – The New Realities,” hosted by Pace University.

Contact: Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY

September 28, 2004

CONGRESSMAN JERROLD NADLER, LMDC CHAIR KEVIN RAMPE,
NYC SCHOOLS CHANCELLOR JOEL I. KLEIN
TO SPEAK AT INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE
COALITION OF URBAN AND METROPOLITAN UNIVERSITIES

WHAT: 10th Annual International Conference of the Coalition of Urban and Metropolitan Universities (CUMU): “Urban and Metropolitan America – The New Realities,” hosted by Pace University.

WHO: Joel I. Klein, chancellor of the New York City Department of Education, will discuss “A New Vision for Public Education” Monday, Oct. 4, 12:45 pm. Jay L. Kriegel, executive director of NYC2012, will discuss “What Are the Benefits of Hosting the Olympic Games: New York City’s Planning Efforts to Host the 2012 Summer Olympics” Tuesday, Oct. 5, 12:30 pm. Manning Marable, professor of public affairs, political science and history at Columbia University, will discuss “Racial Diversity and Democratic Values: The Challenges of an Urban and Metropolitan University” Sunday, Oct. 3, 7:15 pm. Congressman Jerrold Nadler will discuss “Congress’s Role in Education” Sunday, Oct. 3, 12 noon. Kevin M. Rampe, president of the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation (LMDC), will discuss “Redevelopment of Lower Manhattan” Monday, Oct. 4, 3 pm.

WHEN: Saturday, October 2 to Tuesday, October 5.

WHERE: Marriott Financial Center Hotel, 85 West Street, New York City.

Visit http://www.pace.edu/cumu for more information about the conference.

The Coalition of Urban and Metropolitan Universities brings together universities that share the mission of striving for national excellence while contributing to the economic development, social health, and cultural vitality of the urban or metropolitan centers served. Metropolitan Universities are institutions that strive to be responsive to the needs of communities, to include teaching that is adaptable to the diverse needs of metropolitan students, and to build close working relationships with elementary and secondary schools so as to improve the overall quality of education. Metropolitan Universities combine research-based learning with practical application and are dedicated to creating interdisciplinary partnerships and forming alliances with outside public and private organizations to resolve complex metropolitan problems. The Coalition’s 76 member institutions cultivate a close relationship with the urban center and its suburbs, often serving as a catalyst for change as well as a source of enlightened discussion. http://cumu.uc.iupui.edu . Pace University’s hosting of the conference is being conducted by the University’s Center for Downtown New York and its director, Daniel Slippen.

Pace University School of Education to Host Forum on School Reform with Author Jonathan Kozol, May 13

Pace University’s School of Education will host a forum on school reform featuring author Jonathan Kozol on Saturday, May 13, from 10 a.m. to noon at the Pace Downtown Theater, 3 Spruce Street, in lower Manhattan. The event is free and open to the public. Registration begins at 9 a.m.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1696
NEW YORK – Pace University’s School of Education will host a forum on school reform featuring author Jonathan Kozol on Saturday, May 13, from 10 a.m. to noon at the Pace Downtown Theater, 3 Spruce Street, in lower Manhattan. The event is free and open to the public. Registration begins at 9 a.m.

Jonathan Kozol, who graduated summa cum laude from Harvard University and was awarded a Rhodes scholarship to Oxford, is the author of Amazing Grace and Savage Inequalities. In the sixties, Kozol moved from Harvard Square into a poor black neighborhood of Boston and became a fourth grade teacher in the city’s public schools. He has devoted the subsequent decades to issues of education and social justice in America.

Jonathan Kozol who is widely noted as the “most eloquent spokesman for America’s disenfranchised,” has not relented in his criticism of the shameful inequalities of public education. “New York City spends $64,000 yearly to incarcerate a man on Rikers Island but only $5,000 yearly for the education of a child in a typical third grade in the South Bronx. Meanwhile, a white child in a very wealthy suburb in nearby Long Island will be getting up to $20,000 spent on her each year.”

His newest book, Ordinary Resurrections: Children in the Years of Hope, is written from the vantage point of a group of children in the South Bronx, whom he’s known for many years, and who, with “joyful energy, delicious humor, and unshaken faith in their self-worth, defy the morbid expectations of society.” As Kozol points out, “No matter what we do to cheat and hide and injure [children] they light their little lights and stand there at these awful walls that we have built and tell us that the beautiful illumination of their souls is not so readily eclipsed.” Kozol believes that children speak most eloquently for themselves, and this book is a tribute to their voices.

Ordinary Resurrections is set on a block in the South Bronx framed by an underfunded public school, led by a strong Hispanic principal, at one end and a church, led by a priest of rare political courage, on the other end. Besides the children, the teachers of P.S. 30 are also heroes. “Their calling when it’s filled with merriment and beauty, makes me think of joyful priests in Sunday robes when they prepare to give communion. Teaching children of this age, when it’s done right, is more than craft; it’s also partly ministry and partly poetry.”

Since 1996, the Pace University School of Education has provided innovative education programs at the undergraduate, graduate and continuing professional development levels. “The School firmly believes that educators can, and must, make a difference to children and adolescents in schools and in the communities where they live and work,” said Dr. Janet McDonald, dean. The School of Education has been recognized at the national level for the development of a unique professional development school model. This model involves substantial partnerships with elementary and secondary school in low-income areas. The School’s Center for Urban Education, Center for Literacy and Center on Economic Education provide direct service to over one thousand preschool though 12th grade school children enrolled in community-based partnership programs.

The education forum on school reform, sponsored in collaboration with Phi Delta Kappa, is free and open to the public. Advanced reservations are suggested. For more information call: Felice Nudelman at (212) 346-1118 or email: education@pace.edu. Additional information and online registration is also available on the School of Education home page at: http://www.pace.edu/education.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.