The Associated Press: “College mental health screenings go high-tech”

Many college counseling centers are more swamped than ever, therapists say, particularly at this time of year, in the frenzy of final exams and job searches.

Dr. Richard Shadick, Director of Pace University’s Counseling Center in New York City and an adjunct professor of psychology, was interviewed about trends in screening college students for mental health issues – what works, what hasn’t.

Within the counseling field, there is no consensus about whether there really are more college students with mental health issues or whether they are simply increasingly willing to ask for help.

Some say that antidepressants and more support has made it more possible than ever for a student who is mentally ill to attend college. Others have noted that this generation of students seems less able to cope with stress, for whatever reason.

At Pace University in New York, counseling director Richard Shadick and his staff give a presentation at each “University 101” class for freshman and give them a survey to help them get a read on substance abuse and mental health problems they may be having. The mental health staff also spends time on campus giving mini screenings called “checkups from the neck up” and refers students who need help to the counseling center.

Learn more about how mental health is being taken seriously here at Pace and at other college campuses.

Examiner.com (NYC): “University Students Are Graduating But What Do Employers Want?”

Even as the economy is slowly shifting towards the positive, graduating students still face many obstacles in obtaining employment. So how are colleges preparing their students for the job market?

Pace University  is ranked as one of the best universities to attend by US News in their 2011 Best Colleges edition.  

Maxine Sugarman, the Director of Career Services on Pace’s New York City Campus, shares with the Examiner.com how she and her team are preparing graduating seniors and graduate students to be interview-ready for potential employers.

Q: How does Pace University’s career center prepare your up-and-coming graduates for 2011’s competitive job market?

Ms. Sugarman: “We offer more opportunities for students to practice their interview techniques. We offer a ‘Mock Interview Day’ for volunteer recruiters to come to campus and individually interview our students. The recruiters and our career services team share constructive feedback with students and recommend Interview Workshops throughout the academic year. We also increased our efforts to provide video recordings of mock interview sessions between the student and interviewer. This provides students the ability to review the recorded session with their career counselor to focus on improving their delivery of interview answers [and body language]. We have also increased our partnerships with pre-professional student organizations to bring more recruiters on campus so that the students can network with recruiters at earlier stages in their college careers.”

Q: What are some important things graduating students should focus on in their job search?

Ms. Sugarman:“Analyze each job description and focus on selling yourself with the specific skills sets that each job description is requiring. Realize that one size does not fit all; meaning you have to customize each resume and cover letter sent out to the specific job. Learn how to brand yourself and how to network effectively. Our career center has created a LinkedIn mentoring program for business students to connect with Pace alumni who also majored in a business discipline. Networking is more critical than ever in order to uncover leads to job openings.”

Q: As the Director of a prestigious university, what are potential employers sharing with you of the type of graduates they are seeking to hire?

Ms. Sugarman: “Employers have always sought professionally prepared graduates. However, now more than ever employers want graduates who have excelled in the classroom and outside of the classroom. This means the graduate who has internships, extracurricular activities that promote leadership skills and/or has gained experience through volunteering will be a very attractive candidate to potential employers.”

Pace Women’s Basketball in finals

NEWS RELEASE: Pace Women’s Basketball, ranked fifth in its league and sixth in the region, to take on St. Anselm on Sunday. (Left: Brittany Huggins in action)

Coach Carrie Seymour looking to extend career record of 362-200 in her ninth Northeast 10 tournament.

Brittany Huggins in action
Department of AthleticsJohn TagliaferriSports Information Director

914-773-3888 (office)

914-773-3491 (fax)

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 25, 2011

Women’s College Basketball                                                                                                                                                  

 

PACE WOMEN’S BASKETBALL, RANKED #6 IN THE EAST REGION.

TO HOST ST. ANSELM IN NE-10 FIRST ROUND SUNDAY AY 1 PM

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y.- February 25, 2011- With an overall record of 21-7 and 15-7 in the Northeast-10 Conference, this Sunday the Pace University women’s basketball team squares off as the #5 seed against the #12 seed Saint Anselm College Hawks in the first round of the Northeast-10 Conference Playoffs. The Setters and the Hawks will meet at Pace’s Goldstein Fitness Center on its Pleasantville campus at 1 pm.

The game is open to the public with the cost of attendance $7 for adults, $4 for youth and seniors and $1 for students with valid ID. Media admission is available by contacting John Tagliaferri, Pace’s Sports Information Director, at jtagliaferri@pace.edu. Live stats and video are available free at http://livestats.prestosports.com/pace.

Pace finished the regular season with a 21-7 record, while the Hawks were 11-15 overall and 8-14 in the NE-10. The Setters are ranked #6 in the most recent NCAA Division II East Region Poll and are receiving votes in the USA Today/ESPN Division II National Poll.

This will be the 30th meeting between the two schools with Pace holding the head-to-head advantage over the Hawks, 17-12. The Setters have the last 10 meetings, including a 63-41 win on January 11, 2011.

In their last game of the regular season, the Setters defeated American International in the season finale 69-62 to lock up fifth place in the Northeast-10 Conference. Four players scored in double-figures to help the Setters post a key late season victory. Brittany Shields posted a double-double with 15 points and 14 rebounds, while Brittany Huggins led all scorers with 19 points along with seven rebounds. Lisa Welsome netted 14 points, while Carol Johnson came off the bench to total 10 points

Huggins and Shields, and a consistently winning coach

 The Setters were led this season by a pair of Second Team All-Conference players in Brittany Huggins and Brittany Shields. Huggins led the team in scoring as she averaged 14.3 points per game, while also leading the team with 54 three-pointers. Shields was right behind Huggins in scoring as she averaged 14.2 points and lead the team with eight rebounds per contest.

Head Coach Carrie Seymour is in her 19th season as head coach of the Pace women’s basketball team. Coming into Sunday’s playoff game, she has a career record of 362-200. She has guided the Setters to eight NCAA Tournaments, advancing to the Elite 8 once. She has also won Met Coach of the Year honors six times, including last season.

The winner of this game advances to the NE-10 Quarterfinals and will play at the College of Saint Rose on Tuesday, March 1 at 7 pm.

D.J. Henry’s Boston Memorial Service Gets Broad Media Attention

ASSOCIATED PRESS AND A MEDIA MULTITUDE: “Hundreds mourn athlete shot by police.” Head Coach Chris Dapolito was the second person quoted in the Associated Press story about the inspiring memorial service for DJ Henry in Boston attended by 175 Pace students, faculty and staff members and an estimated crowd of 2000. ”There is no cure for how you feel, but there is a treatment for dealing with it. … You must find a way to pick up where D.J. left off and promise to do all that he would have done with his life,” Dapolito said. Read more.

Danroy Henry's parents, Danroy Sr. and Angella Henry, during Friday's memorial service. AP Photo/ STEPHAN SAVOIA

The memorial service was covered by a media multitude including three Boston TV channels, New York stations WCBS-TV, WPIX-TV, along with print and web media such as The Associated Press, The Huffington Post, Boston Globe, Boston Herald, Brockton Enterprise, Tacoma (WA) News Tribune, The Journal News, Enterprisenews.com, the FanHouse  website (with observations about the football team), Sports Channel News, and The Chappaqua Patch.

Head Coach Chris Dapolito was the second person quoted in the Associated Press story (and the first in the NY Daily News story) about the inspiring service at a convention center in Boston, which was  attended by 175 Pace students, faculty and staff members and an estimated crowd of 2,000.

”There is no cure for how you feel, but there is a treatment for dealing with it. … You must find a way to pick up where D.J. left off and promise to do all that he would have done with his life,” Dapolito said.

For video coverage of the memorial, click here.

For a video tribute to D.J. on thebostonchannel.com, click here.

For the full AP article, read below or click here.

Hundreds in Mass. mourn athlete shot by NY police

By JAY LINDSAY
Associated Press

BOSTON (AP) — He was a little boy beaming under Mickey Mouse ears. He was a driven college football player nicknamed Smooth and had a wrist tattoo that read “Family First.” He was an incredibly slow eater.

Photos, family and friends portrayed different sides of Danroy “D.J” Henry at his memorial service Friday in Boston, less than two weeks after he was shot to death in his car by police in suburban New York.

Conflicting stories and confusion surround his death, but no one mourned the 20-year-old Henry as a victim Friday.

“We are gathered to celebrate the life of D.J. Henry. Let me say it again, we are here to celebrate his life,” pastor Gideon A. Thompson of Jubilee Christian Church said to applause on what would have been Henry’s 21st birthday.

An estimated 2,000 people attended the service in a ballroom at the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, including childhood friends, college teammates and classmates at Pace University and U.S. Sen. Scott Brown of Massachusetts.

Speakers told of Henry’s faith and devotion to others and asked the audience to honor him by how they live.

“There is no cure for how you feel, but there is a treatment for dealing with it. … You must find a way to pick up where D.J. left off and promise to do all that he would have done with his life,” said Pace University coach Chris Dapolito.

Henry, of Easton, was shot by police who were responding to a disturbance that spilled outside a Thornwood, N.Y. bar on Oct. 17.

Police have said an officer knocked on the window of a car Henry was driving, and he drove away and hit two officers. But passengers said Henry was trying to move his car out of the fire lane and wasn’t a threat to police.

A law enforcement official said Henry’s blood alcohol level was above the legal limit to drive at the time. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because the autopsy report hadn’t been released.

The attorney for Henry’s family questioned that and is conducting separate blood tests.

Earlier Friday, the lawyer, Michael Sussman, said a police officer was not in harm’s way when he fired the first shot at Henry. Sussman said a ballistics expert he hired determined the same officer fired at least three shots, one into the hood and two into the windshield.

Sussman said the angle of the shot into the hood indicates it was fired from the side and that it would have come first since the officer was on top of the hood when he fired twice into the windshield.

Lucian Chalfen, a spokesman for the Westchester County District Attorney’s office, declined to comment because the investigation is ongoing.

At the memorial, some speakers referred to the cloud around Henry’s death, with Thompson calling Henry a “young man that has been snatched away from us, his life snuffed out like a candle.” Henry’s uncle Kevin Murphy sang in lyrics he wrote for Henry: “What makes men do the evil that they do? How the hell did they disrespect you?”

His mother, Angella Henry, told the audience, “As we continue to fight for the truth, we will continue to need your love and support.”

But most of the service focused on Henry’s personality and life up until the night of the shooting.

Childhood pictures of Henry – at the beach, showing off a Burger King crown, buried in bubbles in a tub – flashed on a screen as mourners walked in.

His friend Desmond Hinds, who was in the car the night of the shooting, recalled hours sitting with Henry as he ate his meals with excruciating slowness. “He wanted to digest his food, that’s what he said,” Hinds said.

His younger sister, Amber, shared an essay she’d written in junior high about how her oldest brother was her hero. His younger brother, Kyle, talked about his brother’s closet full of stylish shoes and how he’d keep Kyle looking good, dropping piles of clothes on the floor when he visited and announcing, “Hand-me-downs!”

“I just smiled because I knew it was coming,” Kyle said.

Speaking at a lectern draped with a cloth with Henry’s Pace football number, 12, his father, Dan Henry, talked about how he’d worn the number during his days playing basketball, and his son adopted it after seeing a picture of him wearing it. It became a symbol of how important family was to his son, he said.

His father said the family still feels his presence.

“That’s what sustains us now,” he said.

Looking out at the large crowd, he added, “Even though he didn’t want to have a big 21st birthday, he’s going to.”

Associated Press writer Jim Fitzgerald in Valhalla, N.Y., contributed to this report.

(This version CORRECTS the name of the slain athlete’s uncle to Kevin Murphy, not Dan Murphy.)

Multiple media note increasing county, state involvement in investigation of death of Pace football player Danroy “DJ” Henry

On the second day of a blizzard of media coverage, many media noted the addition of New York State police and the Westchester County DA to the team investigating the shooting of Pace defense player Danroy (“DJ”) Henry (left).

DJ
Pace football star DJ Henry

By the second day of a blizzard of media coverage, many media noted the addition of New York State police and the Westchester County DA to the team investigating the shooting of Pace defense player Danroy (“DJ”) Henry.

The story of DJ Henry’s death and subsequent investigation has been reported in over 2,400 media articles, TV and radio segments, blog, web, Twitter and YouTube posts. Most media stories mention conflicting accounts and the ongoing investigation. Many also quote head football coach Chris Dapolito and the football captains from the Pace press conference.  The story has been covered by nearly all major media outlets including:

National – Good Morning America, Associated Press, USA Today, ESPN, CNN, The New York Times, Washington Post, Huffington Post, The Christian Science Monitor and affiliates of  the networks in nearly all major media markets and newspapers in cities all over the country.

New York Metro Area – Today in New York, WABC TV, WNBC TV, WCBS TV and radio, WPIX and Fox 5.

Candlelight vigil in DJ's memory brings close to 700 Pace students

Local Westchester and New York City – The Journal News (comprehensive coverage that includes several articles, photos and videos of the shooting, investigation, vigil and police and Pace press conferences), News 12, Patch.com, The Pleasantville Examiner, Daily News, and New York Post.

Local Massachusetts – CBS Boston affiliate WBZ TV and radio, Boston Herald, Boston Globe, ABC Boston Channel.

DA
Westchester County DA Janet Difiore

Westchester County District Attorney Janet DiFiore was quoted in an Associated Press article, saying that her investigation would get to the bottom of what happened.

Additional media coverage is expected with funeral plans as well as the ongoing investigation.

Photos of DJ and the vigil and video of the vigil and press conference can be accessed at www.pace.edu/pacemedia. A letter from Pace President Stephen J. Friedman to the Pace community regarding the tragedy can be read here.

DJ Henry on the fieldDJ Henry

NEWS RELEASE: Pace students to conduct 9 PM, campus-only vigil for student shot in early morning incident

Starting at 9 PM tonight, student organizations on Pace University’s Pleasantville campus will conduct a vigil celebrating the life of Danroy (“DJ”) Henry, the 20-year-old football player who was shot in an incident outside a Thornwood bar early Sunday morning.

NOTE—We will make photos and videos available to media around 10 pm. at www.pace.edu/pacemedia

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, October 18, 2010 – Starting at 9 PM tonight, student organizations on Pace University’s Pleasantville campus will conduct a vigil celebrating the life of Danroy (“DJ”) Henry, the 20-year-old football player who was shot in an incident outside a Thornwood bar early Sunday morning.

The event is open to members of the Pace community. It is closed to media to protect the privacy of students grappling with a difficult situation, but Pace will make available still and video photographs to media around 10:00 pm. and post them on its website at www.pace.edu/pressroom

If your medium is interested, please notify the Pace Public Information office at ccory@pace.edu or 917-608-8164.

The sponsoring organizations are the Student Association (SA), the campus’s student government, and the Student Athlete Advisory Council, an advisory group comprised of delegates from each varsity team.

Students carrying lights will begin the vigil in front of the Goldstein Fitness Center, then progress to the football field and end in the Kessel student center to share memories.

Contact:

Christopher T. Cory, Pace Public Information, 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

 

 

NY1: College Students Learn Budget Lessons With Combo ID-Debit Card

Pace students and staff were interviewed by NY1 about the use of the Pace Higher One card.

From NY1:

By: Tara Lynn Wagner

Debit cards are replacing cash and ID cards on some college campuses. NY1’s Money Matters reporter Tara Lynn Wagner filed the following report.

When it comes to doling out student loans, college administrators across the country are choosing plastic over paper. During orientation, students at Pace University are issued a “Higher One” card, which serves as both their student ID and, when activated, a debit card for their loan money.

“The grants and loans that are left over from my tuition are transferred immediately onto my Pace card, usually by the second week of the semester,” says Pace student Edward Grant.

Students can still choose to receive a paper check, but that check is also issued by Higher One, saving the university time and money.

“It’s cost avoidance for us. We no longer have to produce thousands of paper checks, which is great savings. We no longer have to produce the plastic ID cards,” says Mary Lieto of Pace University.

On campus, the card can be swiped at the bookstore, the library and the cafeteria. Since it bears a MasterCard logo, it can also be used off-campus, such as the local mall or when studying abroad.

It is not a credit card, so students cannot run up a debt, but they may learn soon to budget.

“It’s a tool that will help them to manage their finances and teach them a little bit more about financial literacy,” says Lieto.

Of course, plastic does come with some pitfalls. For one thing, people do not tend to be as conscious of their spending as they are when they are using cold hard cash.

“I don’t really think of it as money. I just kind of blindly swipe my card,” says Pace student Alexandria Tribble.

In addition, consumer advocates from New York Public Interest Research Group say students are being hit with an array of fees that chip away the value of their student loan.

“If you use the card and you swipe it and choose to use debit instead of credit, you’re charged 50 cents. If you use an outside bank and you withdraw money, it’s $2.50,” says NYPIRG campus supervisor Megan Ahearn.

There is also an abandon account fee of up to $19 after nine months of inactivity. Higher One points out that to date, only 1 percent of the 4.8 million students they serve have been subject to this penalty, and say the other charges are either avoidable or common in the banking industry.

Still, with more and more lenders looking to tap into the collegiate market, Ahearn warns administrators to do their homework.

“Campuses should definitely look into the contracts that they’re making with any company, whether it’s Higher One, whether it’s another bank,” says Ahearn. “And they should do so with an eye on their students’ interests at the forefront.”

Watch the video.

NEWS ADVISORY: Pace Students Schedule Candlelight Vigil Tonight at 9PM for Max Moreno, Victim of Fatal Shooting

A candlelight vigil for Max Moreno, the Pace student who last night was victim of a fatal shooting in his off-campus apartment, will take place tonight at 9pm at the plaza in front of Pace’s downtown Manhattan campus, just east of City Hall at the corner of Spruce St. and Park Row/Frankfort St.

The candlelight vigil was covered by DNAinfo.com and the Tribeca Trib
 

A candlelight vigil for Max Moreno, the Pace student who last night was victim of a fatal shooting in his off-campus apartment, has been moved from tomorrow night to tonight because of the weather forecast for tomorrow. The event is sponsored by the Pace University chapter of the Zeta Beta Tau fraternity, to which Moreno belonged. It is scheduled to begin at 9pm at the plaza in front of Pace’s downtown Manhattan campus, just east of City Hall at the corner of Spruce St. and Park Row/Frankfort St.

The story was picked up by the NY Post, NY Daily News, DNAInfo, WPIX and others.

In a letter to the Pace community, President Stephen J. Friedman reported on the tragic death of Moreno.

Dear Pace Faculty, Students and Staff:

With sadness I must inform the Pace Community that late last night a Pace student, Max Moreno, was the victim of a fatal shooting in his off-campus apartment on Gold Street in New York City.

On behalf of all of us I extend deepest sympathies to the family members and friends of Mr. Moreno. Counseling for anyone who is dealing with the emotions of this event is available at the Pace Counseling Center at 212-346-1526, and after hours, a counselor on duty is available through Campus Security.

I urge students and other members of the community with information related to this tragic incident to come forward promptly to either the New York City Police Department, with which we are cooperating fully, or to Campus Security. The First Precinct can be reached at 212-334-0611; Security is 212-346-1800. All information will be treated confidentially.

Sincerely yours,
Stephen J. Friedman

Lienhard School of Nursing Dean Harriet R. Feldman Appointed Interim Provost of Pace University

Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman announced that Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, dean and tenured professor of Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing since 1993, will assume the role of interim provost, effective August 1.

A collaborative leader and renowned expert in the field of nursing education, Feldman has testified before Congress, been honored for her grassroots political advocacy and written over 100 books, scholarly articles and editorials. A sought after speaker on health care and leadership, Feldman has presented at conferences worldwide.

NEW YORK, NY, July 6, 2010 – Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman has announced that Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, dean and tenured professor of Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing since 1993 who also served concurrently as interim dean of Pace’s School of Education (2006-10), will assume the role of interim provost, effective August 1.

“Harriet has been an invaluable member of this university, and we are grateful that she is willing to take on this responsibility until a permanent successor can be found,” said Friedman. “I know that with Harriet’s sure-handed guidance, the academic leadership is in place now to begin to make our new strategic plan’s vision – for Pace University to be considered among the very best at its mission – a reality.”

Feldman succeeds Dr. Geoffrey L. Brackett, who will be leaving Pace after 20 years (the last three as provost) to become executive vice president at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, New York.

Friedman paid tribute to Brackett, saying: “Geoff will be missed. He has helped start us down a path that has led to some important new directions for the University. He has overseen academic renewal across several schools and the college and the hiring of dozens of new faculty, and has brought focus and discipline to the office of the provost through difficult times. He initiated several signature programs that have heightened national recognition for Pace.”  

“This is an exciting time at Pace,” Feldman said. “Just this past week we announced the addition of two exceptionally qualified new deans, Neil Braun for the Lubin School of Business and Andrea Spencer for the School of Education, along with Sheying Chen as the new associate provost. This past year we launched the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies and formed a partnership with Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre. We had five Fulbright finalists and a winner from Lienhard. There is a great deal of momentum at Pace and I look forward to working with the president, deans, faculty, and staff to keep us moving in the right direction.”

Innovator, Researcher, Practitioner and Rainmaker

Feldman has testified in Congress and written numerous articles and letters to editors on nursing policy, becoming a nationally known figure both within her field and in the media. For her legislative work in addressing the nursing and nursing faculty shortage, she received the “STAR” award for grassroots political advocacy from the Association of American Colleges of Nursing.

She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and a Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine, and past editor of the journals Nursing Leadership Forum and Scholarly Inquiry for Nursing Practice.

In the past decade, Feldman has edited or authored four award-winning books. Nurses in the Political Arena: The Public Face of Nursing (2000), with Sandra Lewenson, EdD, RN, FAAN, received an American Journal of Nursing (AJN) Book of the Year Award and a Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Print Media Award. That was soon followed by The Nursing Shortage: Strategies for Recruitment and Retention in Clinical Practice and Education (2003), Educating Nurses for Leadership (2005, with Martha J. Greenberg, PhD, RN), and Teaching Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing (2006, with Rona F. Levin, PhD, RN), all three of which also received AJN Book of the Year Awards.

Lienhard holds the distinction of being among the first institutions in the nation to receive funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) through the RWJF New Careers in Nursing Scholarship Program. Grants provided through this program are being used to increase the number of students enrolled in Lienhard’s accelerated baccalaureate nursing program, the Combined Degree Program (CDP).

In 2006, Feldman was principal author of both a $1.3 million Helene Fuld Health Trust grant to support career-change Bachelor of Science nursing students and a one-year residency program, in partnership with Health and Hospitals Corporation, and a $500,000 Helene Fuld Health Trust scholarship endowment. Also under her direction, in 2005, Lienhard led a consortium of health-related institutions in New York’s Hudson Valley that won a $1.03 million U.S. Labor Department grant. The funds provide monetary credits to healthcare facilities in exchange for loaning Master’s-prepared nurses to teach clinical courses, thereby making it possible to enroll greater numbers of nursing students.  

Feldman’s extensive professional memberships include the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (Board Member: 2003 to 2010); NY/NJ Nursing Spectrum Advisory Board (Board Member, 2002 – Present); Greater New York Organization of Nurse Executives (2001 to Present); and the Eastern Nursing Research Society (1991 to Present).

Prior to joining Pace, Feldman was Chair and Professor of the Department of Nursing at Fairleigh Dickinson University. She started her teaching career at the State University of New York at Farmingdale and taught at Adelphi University. Her clinical appointments have included: Long Island College Hospital, North Shore Visiting Nurse Service, and Long Island Jewish Medical Center.

Feldman received her BS and MS degrees in nursing from Adelphi University and her PhD in nursing science from New York University.  She and her husband live in Bellmore, New York.

A national search for a permanent provost will begin in the Fall, with a candidate to be announced in Spring 2011.  

On June 27, Pace announced three new additions to its academic leadership team effective July 1. Neil Braun, former president of NBC Television Network and CEO of Viacom Entertainment, and current CEO of The CarbonNeutral Company, is the new dean of the Lubin School of Business. Andrea (Penny) M. Spencer, PhD, the new dean of the School of Education, joined from Bank Street College where she was the associate dean for academic affairs. Sheying Chen, PhD, is the new associate provost, previously associate vice chancellor for academic affairs at Indiana University, Southeast.

About Pace University: For more than 100 years, Pace University has been preparing students to become leaders in their fields. A private university, Pace provides an education that combines exceptional academics with professional experience and the New York advantage. Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and enrolls almost 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Media/Great “Photo Op” Alert – Friday, June 11th at 3:00 p.m.

The 2010 Chinese Culture Festival will have demonstrations, lessons, and activities with students from M.S.131 Dr. Sun Yat Sen School. Students will participate in three different collaborative programs, with each lasting 30 to 45 minutes.

IMMERSE YOURSELF IN AN AFTERNOON OF CHINESE CULTURAL WITH STUDENTS FROM M.S. 131 IN CHINATOWN AND  SHADOW PUPPET EXTRAORDINAIRE STEPHEN KAPLIN (BROADWAY’S THE LION KING).

  • 3:00 – 5:00 pm, Invitation/Press-Only Activities with middle-school students from M.S. 131 Sun Yat Sen School – Chinese Calligraphy, Chinese Martial Arts, Overview of China (history, culture and customs), and Student Artistic Interpretations of the day.
  • 5:00 – 6:00 pm, Tiger Tales, Chinese Theater Works Puppet Show, Free and Open to the Public (ages 6 and up) with Stephen Kaplin, who designed the shadow puppets for Julie Taymor’s Lion King on Broadway.
  • 6:00pm: Food Tasting.

WHO/SPONSORS: The Confucius Institute at Pace University, the YMCA 21st Century Community Learning Center in Chinatown, and the Pace University Community and Volunteer Mobilization AmeriCorps program

WHEN: Friday, June 11 at 3:00 pm.  Puppet show, open to the public, begins at 5:00 pm.

WHERE: 21st Century Community Learning Center @ MS 131 CHINATOWN YMCA, 100 Hester Street, New York, NY 10002

WHAT/2010 CHINESE CULTURAL FESTIVAL (invitation/press only) – demonstrations, lessons, and activities with students from M.S.131 Dr. Sun Yat Sen School. Students will participate in three different collaborative programs, with each lasting 30 to 45 minutes. The first, Chinese Art Forms, will be facilitated by David Shen, who will provide demonstrations in calligraphy writing, followed by an active lesson in which the students, too, will practice the art of calligraphy. Chinese Martial Arts, the second program, will be conducted by Lin Ai Wei, founder of Jing Xin Yuan (Bensonhurst Brooklyn), who will give a brief history of martial arts in China, as well as a demonstration. The third program, Magical China, will provide, through video clips and other visuals, a brief history of China, and its culture and customs.  Students will then be encouraged to draw, paint and write words that reflect what they learned throughout the day. After the completion of the programs, there will be a food tasting, in which participants can sample a variety of Chinese foods from local Chinatown vendors.

WHAT/TIGER TALES SHADOW PUPPET SHOW (FREE and open to the public).  Drawing on China’s two-thousand-year history of shadow puppetry, Tiger Tales features an artful blend of Eastern and Western, ancient and contemporary techniques that is the hallmark of all Chinese Theater Works (CTW) productions.  The show has been widely-acclaimed and performed across America, South Korea, Taiwan and China, notably at the 2005 First International Shadow Play Festival in Tangshan, China, where it won citations for Best Performance, Best Short Plays, and Best Voice-Over Narration. At the 2009 Shanghai International Puppet Festival, Tiger Tales was honored with awards for Best Directing, Best Puppet Design and Arts Innovation. Tiger Tales is performed in English accompanied by traditional Chinese music.

Tiger Tales is based in the popular wisdom of Chinese folktales and literature.  The production deals humorously with issues of power and survival of the small and powerless in the modern jungle, where the proverb, “working for the emperor is as dangerous as working for the tiger” still holds true.  The stories are narrated by a wise old rabbit, telling her grand-daughter some of the adventures of her eventful life, including her hair-raising encounters with Tiger, the reigning King of the jungle.

CTW’s Stephen Kaplin, who designed the shadow puppets for Julie Taymor’s Lion King and Ping Chong’s Cathay (for which he won a Hewes Award), has created new acetate figures for this production based on the 80-year-old, leather shadow antique figures.  In performance, Kaplin solos as the live story teller creating unique and detailed voices for more than a dozen of the characters in the show.

MEDIA CONTACT/RSVP: Samuella Becker, Pace Public Information, sbecker2@pace.edu, 212-346-1637 or 917-734-5172

ABOUT THE CONFUCIUS INSTITUTE AT PACE UNIVERSITY. Founded in 2009, it is the first university-based Confucius Institute in New York City and one of 70 in the US and over 300 around the world created by China to spread knowledge of Chinese language and culture. Pace’s Confucius Institute expects to inaugurate Chinese language classes for both students and professional groups; encourage interdisciplinary scholarship on China through collaborative research, conferences and public lectures; develop innovative teaching and learning techniques and institutional exchanges; integrate study of China into the university’s liberal arts and professional curricula; and sponsor seminars for professionals in business, education, film and theater. www.pace.edu/confucius

ABOUT PACE UNIVERSITY. For nearly 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu