Lienhard School Wins Nearly $1 Million to Enhance New Nursing Doctoral Program

At a time when the US population is increasingly diverse and quality patient outcomes and patient safety are hot topics in health care, Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing has won a three-year federal grant of nearly $1 million to enhance its new doctoral program in the areas of cultural competence and evidence-based practice.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Cara Halstead Cea, 914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu or Joanne K. Singleton, PhD, 212-346-1903, jsingleton@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF NURSING WINS FEDERAL GRANT OF NEARLY $1 MILLION TO ENHANCE TRAINING IN MULTICULTURAL ISSUES, PRACTICES BASED ON RESEARCH $900,439 grant from U.S.

Department of Health and Human Services will deepen new doctoral program’s emphasis on primary care for underserved populations

NEW YORK, NY – At a time when the US population is increasingly diverse and quality patient outcomes and patient safety are hot topics in health care, Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing has won a three-year federal grant of nearly $1 million to enhance its new doctoral program in the areas of cultural competence and evidence-based practice.

According to Lienhard Dean Harriet R. Feldman, the changes will help keep Lienhard “a step ahead of the rest” in the burgeoning national effort to make sure students are prepared to address the needs of diverse populations using the best available evidence. The award comes from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services under its Advanced Education Nursing Grant program. The grant will help provide curriculum enhancements for the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program that Lienhard announced this spring.

The enhancements will focus on increasing student and faculty expertise in the areas of cultural competence and evidence-based practice improvement. The DNP program is intended to educate students’ to reach the highest level of clinical practice in nursing. Currently, all enrolled students are Family Nurse Practitioners (FNPs). The first class of 24 enters this fall. Lienhard’s FNP program is ranked ninth in the nation by US News & World Report.

Both DNP faculty members and students will get additional training in cultural awareness and sensitivity, producing what has come to be known as “cultural competence.”

Instruction will expand in delivering primary care that draws on scientific evidence, one aspect of “evidence-based practice,” or EBP.

The training will focus especially on vulnerable groups. Feldman co-edited a recent book on the subject with Lienhard graduate chair, Rona F. Levin, “EBP is based on the idea that nurses can contribute to the development of a scientific base for nursing practice by critiquing and questioning standard guidelines, treatments and outcomes. It empowers nurses on the front lines to fix problems.”

Team leaders. National healthcare accrediting bodies including The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and The Joint Commission are urging healthcare organizations to assess their capacity to meet patients’ cultural needs not only with training, but with such care components as language services, religious and spiritual care, and special diets.

“This focus of this grant will help distinguish our Doctor of Nursing Practice program from the others. And the skills of cultural competence and evidence-based practice are what employers tell us they are looking for,” said Feldman.

Added Joanne K. Singleton, Ph.D., the Director of the FNP-DNP program and the Project Director for the grant, “Our students will be challenged to learn how to design, deliver and lead interdisciplinary primary health care teams in developing and implementing culturally-competent best practices. We expect our graduates to make significant contributions to the overall health of our nation, which will include addressing national health disparities.”

About the Lienhard School of Nursing: With classrooms and laboratories in culturally diverse urban and suburban settings, Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing is committed to innovation and excellence in education, research, and practice in primary health care. It has nearly doubled in size over the last five years, and now has more than 700 students enrolled in baccalaureate and master’s degree programs, all approved by the New York State Education Department and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. Lienhard partners with communities to foster human growth and dignity and provide primary care, and is devoted to preparing individuals, families, and communities at local, national, and international levels to meet health care demands now and in the future. Professional education at Pace University: Since 1906 Pace University has offered professional education that combines liberal arts with practical experience and the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York. It enrolls more than 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

The Lienhard School of Nursing Awarded $750,000+ Federal Grant for Primary Health Care Program

ace University’s the Lienhard School of Nursing was awarded $750,000+ from the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Division of Nursing for the outreach project, Primary Health Care for Urban Underserved and At-Risk.

Pleasantville, N. Y. — Pace University’s the Lienhard School of Nursing was awarded $750,000+ from the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Division of Nursing for the outreach project, Primary Health Care for Urban Underserved and At-Risk. This funding will provide additional ongoing care for underserved populations and other high-risk groups, such as the elderly, individuals with HIV-AIDS, substance abusers, the homeless, and victims of domestic violence through placing health care providers at community sites throughout the New York area and Westchester County.
“The presence of health care providers at community sites increases the proportion of persons who have a specific source of ongoing health care, and will hopefully help increase the number of nursing graduates that will practice in these underserved areas as a result of clinical experiences as students,” said Dr. Lillie M. Shortridge-Baggett project director, professor and director of international affairs at the Center for Nursing Research, Clinical Practice, and International Affairs.
This 3-year funding will facilitate efforts already in place with several community partners through Pace University’s Primary Health Care Associates (PHCA). The PHCA at the Lienhard School of Nursing was established in 1997 through the School’s Center for Nursing Research, Clinical Practice, and International Affairs. PHCA provides a wide range of primary health care services in a variety of settings through contract agreements with community agencies/clients. The PHCA is staffed with advanced practice nurses, registered nurses with specialized certification, and undergraduate and graduate students who are hired as clinical practice interns.
“Through these partnerships primary care services are available to the community without the need to physically set up additional expensive clinics. It also creates a venue for faculty practice and student clinical experience,” said Jamestta A. Newland, program director and director of clinical practice at LSN.
PHCA provides a wide range of services, including: primary care visits (e.g., annual physicals, acute and chronic illness care, and immunizations), consultation and referral, health case management, health education, summer camp coverage, a Personal Health Management Program (nutrition, physical fitness, and stress management), and training (e.g., first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation). Every effort is made to also accommodate special needs.
PHCA practice sites are established at the Henry Street Settlement and WE CAN, a bottle and can redemption center for the poor and homeless, in Manhattan. Other agencies include Pathways for Youth, an after school program in the Bronx; Yonkers Spectrum School Health Program, nurse-managed school-based clinics in Yonkers and Greystone Child Care, a pre-kindergarten day care center, also in Yonkers; and St. Christopher-Ottilie Foster Care Adoption Agency in Queens. Other Westchester partners are Ossining Open Door, Hudson River HealthCare in Peekskill, and the Westchester County Department of Health and Department of Social Services. The Bergen County Department of Health Services is a New Jersey partner.