The New York Times, Theater Review: “A Family’s Songs of Love and Loss, ‘Myths and Hymns,’ Directed by Elizabeth Lucas”

Performing Arts students Donell James Foreman ’12, Matthew Farcher ’12 (pictured), Pace alumna Ally Bonino ’11 and Performing Arts Assistant Professor Robert Meffe are getting major accolades for their work in “Myths and Hymns.”

Chief Theater Writer Charles Isherwood’s review of “Myths and Hymns” appeared on the front page of The New York Times “TheArts” section on February 9 and included accolades for several members of the Pace Performing Arts community – Donell James Foreman (BFA ’12), Matthew Farcher (BFA ’12), Pace alumna Ally Bonino (BFA ’11) and Performing Arts Assistant Professor Robert Meffe.
 
HIGHLIGHTS FROM ISHERWOOD’S THEATER REVIEW:
 
As the original title indicates, it’s a musically eclectic collection of songs that alternates between adaptations of 19th-century hymns and classic myths with contemporary lyrics supplied (mostly) by Mr. Guettel (best known for his Broadway musical “The Light in the Piazza”). Ms. Lucas has shown judicious taste in supplying only minimal dialogue for the new version: the songs remain the focus of the show, expertly performed by a five-member band in spare orchestrations by Bruce Coughlin and Robert Meffe and sung with bright fervor by a six talented singers.
 
Over a simple, lilting music-box melody Ms. Larsen laments the disappearance of yet another lover. (They are all played by the fine tenor Matthew Farcher – pictured)
 
Myths and Hymns

Music and lyrics by Adam Guettel, with new narrative by Elizabeth Lucas; directed by Ms. Lucas; choreography by Wendy Seyb; music supervisor, Robert Meffe; sets by Ann Bartek; costumes by Emily Morgan DeAngelis; lighting by Herrick Goldman; sound by Janie Bullard; musical director, Katya Stanislavskaya; stage manager, Kristine Ayers. Presented by Prospect Theater Company, Cara Reichel, producing artistic director; Melissa Huber, managing director. At the West End Theater, Church of St. Paul and St. Andrew, 263 West 86th Street, Manhattan; (212) 352-3101; prospecttheater.org. Through Feb. 26. Running time: 1 hour 20 minutes.

WITH: Linda Balgord (Woman), Ally Bonino (Trickster), Matthew Farcher (Lover), Donell James Foreman (Shapeshifter), Anika Larsen (Daughter), Lucas Steele (Son) and Bob Stillman (Husband).

The New York Times: “A Little Imperfection for That Smile?”

There’s an odd trend catching on in Japan, whereby women are intentionally creating a “fanged” or “snaggletooth” look for themselves, referred to in Japan as “yaeba.”

Dr. Emilie Zaslow, an assistant professor in Pace’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences and author of “Feminism, Inc. – Coming of Age in Girl Power Media Culture,” comments in Sunday’s New York Times as to why Japanese women are paying for “imperfections” deemed attractive — the kinds of tooth issues a lot of Americans pay thousands to correct with braces.

In Japan, a new fashion has women paying to have their straight teeth purposefully disarranged.

A result of tooth-crowding commonly derided in the United States as “snaggleteeth” or “fangs,” the look is called “yaeba” in Japanese or “double tooth.” Japanese men are said to find this attractive: blogs are devoted to yaeba, celebrities display it proudly, and now some women are paying dentists to create it artificially by affixing plastic fronts to their real teeth.

Dr. Emilie Zaslow, an assistant professor of communication studies at Pace University in Manhattan who has studied gender identity and beauty in consumer culture, noted in Sunday’s New York Times Style Section that such ever-shifting tastes often have one thing in common: a fixation with youth.

“The gapped tooth is sort of preorthodontic or early development, and the naturally occurring yaeba is because of delayed baby teeth, or a mouth that’s too small,” she said. “It’s this kind of emphasis on youth and the sexualization of young girls.”

The imperfect teeth phenomenon has its Western equivalents.  Lauren Hutton popularized it in the 1970s, but the gap has seen a comeback recently with popular models like Lara Stone and Georgia Jagger.

Falsely imperfect teeth aren’t easy for everyone to swallow, perhaps because for most people, imperfections come naturally but don’t score multimillion-dollar contracts. (According to a Forbes report in May, Ms. Stone had earned $4.5 million in the preceding 12 months.) Dr. Zaslow suggested that contrived imperfections like yaeba teeth have nothing to do with imperfection. “It’s not based in self-acceptance,” she said.

In other words, it’s as phony as Botox. “It’s still women changing their appearance primarily for men,” Dr. Zaslow said.

The New York Times (front page): “Weiner’s Exit Sets Off a Race to Be Israel’s Better Friend”

Pace made the front page of Tuesday’s New York Times, where Chris Malone, prominently identified as an associate professor of political science at Pace, was quoted saying the forthcoming race to replace Congressman Anthony Wiener “will be a one-upsmanship on who is more pro-Israel.” At the end of the article, Malone also provided a second mention of Pace and the closing “kicker”: “Dr. Malone, the Pace political scientist, predicted that other issues would indeed emerge in the campaign, but said the importance of the Jewish vote would remain.

“There’s bigger fish to fry,” he said, “as long as they’re fried kosher.”

Dr. Christopher Malone

Pace made the front page of Tuesday’s New York Times, where Chris Malone, prominently identified as an associate professor of political science at Pace, was quoted saying the forthcoming race to replace Congressman Anthony Wiener “will be a one-upsmanship on who is more pro-Israel.”

At the end of the article, Malone also provided a second mention of Pace and the closing “kicker”: “Dr. Malone, the Pace political scientist, predicted that other issues would indeed emerge in the campaign, but said the importance of the Jewish vote would remain.

“There’s bigger fish to fry,” he said, “as long as they’re fried kosher.”

Read the full article.

A similar story with Malone ran on NY1 TV.

Check out Pace’s Political Science program.

The New York Times: “Law Student’s Alter Ego: Filmmaker”

Anthony Desiato, a current Pace law student and comic shop employee, is featured in an interesting article in the New York Times after making a documentary or “D.I.Y film” as his “creative outlet… ‘in order to stay sane'” and landed the coveted chance to show it at Comic-Con.

Anthony Desiato, a current Pace law student and comic shop employee, is featured in an interesting article in the New York Times after making a documentary or “D.I.Y film” as his “creative outlet… ‘in order to stay sane'” and landed the coveted chance to show it at Comic-Con.

The film is a sweet-natured exploration of Mr. Oto’s quirky relationship with his shop, his employees and his loyal, foul-mouthed and eccentric clientele, some of them man-cave-dwellers who seem to have sprung from the pages of the comic books they hoard and devour. Mr. Desiato’s collection, of 500 graphic novels and 100 superhero statuettes, is confined to his bedroom at his parents’ home.

He wrapped the film in time to return to law school in the fall and then went toWithoutabox, an online hub for film festival submissions, and sent out a dozen paid applications. The movie was picked up by NewFilmmakers, which screened it at Anthology Film Archives in May. Now comes Comic-Con, a mainstream event that draws 130,000 comics aficionados each summer. Mr. Desiato’s was one of just five documentaries accepted.

"Far left, Steve Oto, who owns the comics shop Alternate Realities, in Scarsdale, N.Y., and Anthony Desiato, a law student and shop employee who made a film about it." Richard Perry/The New York Times

Read the full article in The New York Times online.

Pace Law School

The New York Times: “Who Made This Mess of Planet Earth”

Andrew C. Revkin’s association with Pace was mentioned in the author’s note to his favorable review of “Here On Earth” in the July 17th New York Times Book Review.

Andrew C. Revkin, the senior fellow for environmental understanding at Pace University, favorably reviews “Here On Earth”  in his Dot Earth blog for the Opinion Pages of NYTimes.com while commenting on today’s environmental situation.

From the article:

An overwhelming majority of scientists agree that humans have upended hosts of ecosystems and are exerting a growing and potentially calamitous influence on the climate. Some, perhaps in response to public indifference, have a tendency to push beyond the data in arguing for action. “Here on Earth” places Flannery in this group. I had a moment, about halfway in, when I was ready to give up in the face of overheated descriptions of environmental problems. But I stuck it out and was heartened to see Flannery abandon the rhetoric of shame and woe and turn to a more reasoned assessment of a young, intelligent species that finds itself in quite a predicament. After all, it’s not easy being the first life-form to become both a planet-scale force and — ever so slowly and uncomfortably — aware of that fact. That awareness is in its early stages and, as Flannery notes, “infancy is the most dangerous period of life.”

Read the full article in The New York Times.

The New York Times: Pace alumni weddings

Is this a record? The New York Times accepted wedding listings submitted by three Pace alumni.

Is this a record? The New York Times accepted wedding listings submitted by four Pace alumni this month:

Alexis Haas Rubin (Masters from Pace) and  Evan Woolley

Sara Yerry (Masters from Pace) and Jared Gerber

Andreea Vasilescu (Bachelor from Pace) and Michael Sean Gleeson

The New York Times: “True Blue in District Nine”

Christopher Malone, an associate professor of political science at Pace University and the director of the Pforzheimer Honors College on the New York City campus, writes an opinion article for The New York Times. Malone shares his opinion on Anthony Weiner, and politics.

Christopher Malone, an associate professor of political science at Pace University and the director of the Pforzheimer Honors College on the New York City campus, writes an opinion article for The New York Times. Malone shares his opinion on Anthony Weiner, and what the New York congressman’s sins could mean for his party. From the article:

Ultimately, though, Weinergate is just the latest example of the blurring of the lines between the public official and the private individual. I’m not sure this is a good thing. It makes us all dumber. I’d be willing to bet that most Americans can now tell you all about what Weiner did without being able to say one word about his legislative record as a US Congressman. And that is a shame.

Read the full opinion article in The New York Times.

The New York Times: “David Mamet, Gone Victorian”

The New York Times covers the production of David Mamet’s “Boston Marriage” that is being held at the Woodward Hall Theater at Pace. It will be performed by The Hudson Stage Company.

The New York Times covers the production of David Mamet’s “Boston Marriage” that is being held at the Woodward Hall Theater at Pace. It will be performed by The Hudson Stage Company.

For more information and to read the full article, visit The New York Times.

The New York Times: “Top 10 List: Retooling for the Fastest-Growing Fields”

Jonathan Hill, assistant dean of Seidenberg School of Computer Science, was quoted in a New York Times article about the fastest growing career fields. By 2018, a million news jobs are expected to be available, such as Biomedical Engineer, Home Health Aide and Network Systems and Data Communications Analyst.

You can work in many locations as a Network Systems and Data Communications Analyst because almost every organization needs someone with those skill sets. “‘If you have the degree, you can work at Sloan-Kettering, the F.B.I., PNC Bank or the New York City Ballet,” he says. “If you are good, you will be employed.'”

Jonathan Hill, assistant dean of Seidenberg School of Computer Science, was quoted in a New York Times article about the fastest growing career fields. By 2018, a million news jobs are expected to be available, such as Biomedical Engineer, Home Health Aide and Network Systems and Data Communications Analyst.

You can work in many locations as a Network Systems and Data Communications Analyst because almost every organization needs someone with those skill sets. “If you have the degree, you can work at Sloan-Kettering, the F.B.I., PNC Bank or the New York City Ballet,” Hill says. “If you are good, you will be employed.”

To read the full article and get a detailed Top 10 List of the fast-growing fields, their salaries, why it’s growing, and the necessary training, visit The New York Times.

Visit Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science here.

New York Times and The Day: Merchant of Venice at Pace

Pace was mentioned in Connecticut’s TheDay.com because a production of Merchant of Venice will be held at the Schimmel Theater. The show was also mentioned in the New York Times in an article exclaiming the abundance of Shakespeare performances in the area.

Pace was mentioned in Connecticut’s TheDay.com because a production of Merchant of Venice will be held at the Schimmel Theater. The show was also mentioned in the the New York Times in an article exclaiming the abundance of Shakespeare performances in the area.

You can read the full articles in TheDay.com or The New York Times!

You can find more information about the performance of Merchant of Venice that will be held in Pace University’s Schimmel Theater here!