AOL Jobs, The Journal News: Professor John Alan James quoted in big name business articles

John Alan James, professor of business management at Pace University, is sought out for his expertise in the world of Business as he is quoted in AOL Jobs and The Journal News online this week.

John Alan James, professor of business management at Pace University, is sought out for his expertise in the world of Business as he is quoted in AOL Jobs and  The Journal News online this week.

“Whether a company can simply up and move to avoid new or higher taxes depends on the size and type of business, John Alan James, professor of business management at Pace University, told AOL Jobs.

Larger companies with a lot of employees and significant infrastructure in a state probably won’t opt to move lock, stock and barrel. But they may choose to show their displeasure at higher taxes by siting a new plant or subsidiary somewhere else.

That’s especially true in today’s global marketplace where cheaper labor can be found in countries around the world, says James, who served as Connecticut’s first director of International Business Economic Development.-“

–  “Employers Threaten to Leave States Seeking to Boost Taxes” AOL Jobs

“‘The political mess in Washington makes everyone uneasy,” said John Alan James, a professor at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business”

– “Moody’s warns Westchester: Aaa bond rating at risk” Journal News

Visit Pace’s Lubin School of Business

LoHud.com: “Minor party has too much to pull”

Pace Law professor writes an opinion article in the Journal News online (LoHud.com) about the politics of same-sex marriage.

Pace Law professor writes an opinion article in the Journal News online (LoHud.com) about the politics of same-sex marriage.

From LoHud.com:

Courage is not a quality that we usually associate with politics, or politicians. Compromise, deal-making, arm-twisting, quid pro quos, are most often the ingredients of lawmaking. So we should not be surprised that despite popular support for legalizing gay marriage, and despite the strenuous advocacy by the governor, the mayor, and other leading figures, a small and marginal political party, with a leader wielding outsized influence, will be the decider in this momentous battle.

Read the full opinion article here.

Rye Brook coyote may have ingested rabid animal | LoHud.com | The Journal News

Pace professor and director of the environmental science graduate program, Melissa Grigione, Ph.D., was called upon for her expertise on wildlife and quoted throughout a recent Journal News article about coyotes.

Pace professor and director of the environmental science graduate program, Melissa Grigione, Ph.D., was called upon for her expertise on wildlife and quoted throughout a recent Journal News article about coyotes. Read the article on the Journal News web site by clicking on the link below:

Rye Brook coyote may have ingested rabid animal | LoHud.com | The Journal News.

Pace professor’s film traces Kol Nidre’s origin, impact | LoHud.com | The Journal News

Allen Oren, a Dyson professor and producer of a PBS documentary on the Kol Nidre prayer, is featured in The Journal News. The film will air Sunday, September 12 at 7:00pm on Channel 13, WNET, and on other public television stations in 34 cities throughout the month including WLIW, Channel 21 at 7:00pm September 16.

Allen Oren, a Dyson professor and producer of a PBS documentary on the Kol Nidre prayer, is featured in The Journal News. The film will air Sunday, September 12 at 7:00pm on Channel 13, WNET, and on other public television stations in 34 cities throughout the month including WLIW, Channel 21 at 7:00pm September 16. The story begins on the front page of the paper and continues on page 10 with a photo of Oren with a copy of the documentary in his home in New Rochelle.

(Photo: Meagan Kanagy/The Journal News)

Pace professor’s film traces Kol Nidre’s origin, impact | LoHud.com | The Journal News.

The program was highlighted in NY1’s weekly segment “Your Weekend Starts Now,” which shows entertaining picks for great things to do each weekend around the city.

http://www.ny1.com/content/ny1_living/arts/125532/your-weekend-starts-now-9-16-10

More on “18 Voices Sing Kol Nidre” from Professor Oren below. The following was used in a pitch to media by Pace Public Information:

“A number of years ago I was leaving the Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C., when my attention was wrested by a video testimonial on a large screen on the wall.  A survivor was testifying to his story.

He told of how his work detail in a Nazi labor camp was exhausted on the afternoon before Yom Kippur day, the holiest day in Judaism.  Suddenly the sky turned black, the guards allowed a weather break, and the inmates saw it as literally a heavenly sign.

First one, then another began singing the Kol Nidre, the prayer that begins the Yom Kippur observance.   Some knew the words, many hummed haltingly, but all chanted in unison.

“How,” I asked myself, “did one prayer, the Kol Nidre, become so important to one people, the Jews?”

Finding the answer led to “18 Voices Sing Kol Nidre,” a documentary and DVD I recently completed that’s scheduled for broadcast in New York as a pledge piece on WNET’s THIRTEEN on September 12 at 7 p.m. and on WLIW21 on September 16 at 7 p.m.

It will also air this High Holiday season in more than 34 other cities across the country, including Los Angeles, San Francisco, Boston, Washington, Baltimore, Miami, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Detroit, Kansas City, and Denver.

How did the Kol Nidre become a Jewish anthem and, as it turned out, an object of intense interest for non-Jews as well?  How did a prayer that doesn’t even mention God overcome centuries of persecution and save itself with a haunting melody?

The answers arrive when 18 storytellers in the piece, most from New York City, share their tales about the prayer.  Some are top experts on the chant, some are just those who have been changed by chanting it. Each tells his or her story with the help of unique visuals and unique musical settings for the melody.

The 18 voices—18 storytellers—include a Hassidic rabbi who tells the tale of a stable boy who is illiterate and can’t read the Kol Nidre prayer, but in frustration lets his shepherd’s flute fill the synagogue with spirit.

Also, famed African-American author Julius Lester, a convert to Judaism as an adult, who recalls as a boy practicing the melody on piano “as its beauty and pain twisted together like the braids of a girl’s hair.”

And a composer demonstrates how the chant has reached beyond Jewish circles, adapted by non-Jewish musicians from Beethoven to Johnny Mathis to the Electric Prunes.

Then a film critic shows how the prayer burst onto the pop scene with the first talking film, “The Jazz Singer” in 1927, which included, among the first words heard on film, the Kol Nidre.

In short, we learn the secrets of a sacred chant from those who have been touched by it.”

Professor Oren is a full-time associate professor of Journalism at Pace and a long-time working journalist, first in print, including a stint as Entertainment Editor of USA Today, then in broadcast, recently winning an Emmy for a series on the history of Madison Square Garden and an Emmy nomination for a documentary on the topic.

Oren is a long-time student of Jewish history and religion and his late father was a rabbi in Queens for 50 years.

For more on the documentary, visit www.18voices.com.

Fresh off her Emmy Award buzz, Temple Grandin speaks at Pace University | LoHud.com | The Journal News

Temple Grandin, the subject of HBO’s biographical film “Temple Grandin,” speaks at Tuesday’s 2010 Convocation at Pace University in Pleasantville. Grandin is one of the world’s most famous autistic activists for people with autism. (Photo: Seth Harrison/The Journal News)

Fresh off her Emmy Award buzz, Temple Grandin speaks at Pace University | LoHud.com | The Journal News.

Temple Grandin, the subject of HBO’s biographical film “Temple Grandin,” speaks at Tuesday’s 2010 Convocation at Pace University in Pleasantville. Grandin is one of the world’s most famous autistic activists for people with autism. (Photo: Seth Harrison/The Journal News)

NEWS ADVISORY: Temple Grandin, Subject of Film That Won Five Emmys, to be Convocation Speaker Sept. 7

Temple Grandin, Ph.D., the subject of the biographical film “Temple Grandin” starring Claire Danes that won five Emmys last week, will keynote Pace University’s Convocation on Tuesday, September 7 from 2 to 3 p.m.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact: Cara Cea, (914) 773-3312, ccea@pace.edu

TEMPLE GRANDIN, SUBJECT OF FILM THAT WON FIVE EMMYS, TO BE PACE UNIVERSITY CONVOCATION SPEAKER SEPT. 7 IN PLEASANTVILLE, NY

Recently named a Time magazine “hero,” Grandin is expected to deepen understanding of “outsider” feelings common to many students

Entire university urged to read “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time”

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, AUGUST 31, 2010 – Temple Grandin, Ph.D., the subject of the biographical film “Temple Grandin” starring Claire Danes that won five Emmys last week, will keynote Pace University’s Convocation on Tuesday, September 7 from 2 to 3 p.m. on the Pace campus in Pleasantville, New York (Goldstein Health and Fitness Center, 861 Bedford Road, entrance #3). Media admission by press pass.

Temple Grandin is perhaps the most famous of the world’s many professionally successful people with autism. Her pioneering understanding of animals, drawing on her own special sensitivities, has led to her designing humane handling systems for half the cattle-processing facilities in the US. A Ph.D. in Animal Science from the University of Illinois, she is a professor at Colorado State University.

The feature-length film on her early years premiered Saturday, February 6 and is still airing on HBO.

From the official Emmy press release: “Temple Grandin, the story of a woman who overcame autism to pioneer humane treatment for cattle, received five Emmys, including best made-for-television movie. Claire Danes was selected for her performance as Grandin and Julia Ormond and David Strathairn won for their supporting roles. Mick Jackson received an Emmy for directing the film.”

Jackson hailed Grandin in the audience. “I tried to make your movie like you: spunky, smart, honest, vivid, sometimes crazily emotional, never sentimental.”

The Pace appearance will be her first in the NY Metropolitan area since the Emmys.

Common reading, common moments

Grandin’s appearance at Pace dovetails with this year’s Common Reading selection, “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time” by Mark Haddon (Doubleday), a bestselling novel that imaginatively takes readers inside the brave and funny perceptions of a brilliant 15-year-old who happens to have autism. This year Pace is beginning the second year of its Build on Special Strengths (BOSS) program, which  gives students with autism the opportunity—and the support they need—to participate fully in college. The program is believed to be the only one like it in the country.

Grandin’s story is less about people who are “different” than it is about the moments almost everyone has of being an outsider. As one observer noted, “Grandin… is revered.… She is a voice for those who are sometimes challenged to make themselves heard.”

Grandin grew up with what doctors originally wrote off as incurable peculiarities – withdrawal, skittishness, difficulty responding to other people. Thanks to a mother who refused to give up on her, she eventually found teachers and mentors who encouraged her interests in science, supported her awakening sense of her own creative powers, tolerated her stubborn streak, and eventually recognized her gifts.

An advocate for others with conditions on what is now called the “autism spectrum,” she has written seven books and 700 articles, is in high demand as a speaker, and has been featured on media from People to the Today Show. Among others, she has consulted for Burger King and McDonald’s.

Grandin was recently listed as one of twenty-five “Heroes” of 2010 in this year’s Time 100, the magazine’s annual list of the 100 most influential people in the world.

About Pace

For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

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