Swine Flu and Similar Animal-Borne Viruses are Ticking Time Bombs Says Pace Law Professor

In the wake of the recent swine flu outbreak, Pace Law School environmental and animal law professor David Cassuto is warning that animal-borne viruses like the swine flu are ticking time bombs that not only pose a danger to humans, but the environment as well.

From: Pace Law School 78 North Broadway White Plains, NY 10603

Rubenstein Communications, Inc – Public Relations Contact: Gladwyn Lopez – 212-843-9231; glopez@rubenstein.com

Regina Pappalardo – 914-422-4268; rpappalardo@law.pace.edu

AVAILABLE FOR INTERVIEW

SWINE FLU AND SIMILAR ANIMAL-BORNE VIRUSES ARE TICKING TIME BOMBS RESULTING FROM IMPROPER CONFINEMENT AND POSE POTENTIAL DANGER FOR ENVIRONMENT SAYS PACE LAW SCHOOL PROFESSOR

* * * Professor Advises Contaminated Soil and Groundwater Should be of Equal Concern

In the wake of the recent swine flu outbreak, Pace Law School environmental and animal law professor David Cassuto is warning that animal-borne viruses like the swine flu are ticking time bombs that not only pose a danger to humans, but the environment as well.

“The best way to avert deadly flu is to stop creating ideal conditions for its incubation,” according to Professor Cassuto. “We’re hearing a lot of statements from officials about how pandemics like these are inevitable and that preparedness is the key. However, preventing the “factory farm” conditions that allow these viruses to fester and thrive is the real issue. New legislation and regulations may be needed.”

The overcrowding of thousands of pigs, cows, chickens, etc. into cramped, filthy quarters creates an environment that is ideal for the fast spread of potentially dangerous viruses, while the flies and other pests attracted to these conditions may allow for transportation of these diseases to other areas.

Of equal importance, Prof. Cassuto advises that these animal viruses that have developed from improper confinement situations can pose additional threats to the environment. “Pigs and other confined animals are fed millions of pounds of antibiotics every year. Those antibiotics make their way into the ground and water and eventually into us. The upshot is more drug-resistant bacteria and a systemic environmental contamination problem.”

**EDITOR’S PLEASE NOTE** Professor David Cassuto is available for interview by contacting Gladwyn Lopez at 212-843-9231 or glopez@rubenstein.com.