Pace, EPA sign environmental self-audit

Pace University, with campuses in New York City and Westchester and Orange Counties, has taken advantage of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) innovative self-audit program with an agreement to conduct a comprehensive environmental audit of its seven campuses.

Contact: (EPA) Teresa Ippolito (212) 637-3671
(Pace) Chris Cory, 212-346-1117, cell 917-608

FOR USE JUNE 26 OR THEREAFTER
Photos of event in Pace bio lab available on request

EPA AND PACE UNIVERSITY SIGN COMPREHENSIVE
ENVIRONMENTAL SELF-AUDIT AGREEMENT.
SEVEN PACE FACILITIES INVOLVED

New York, N.Y. – Pace University, with campuses in New York City and Westchester and Orange Counties, has taken advantage of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) innovative self-audit program with an agreement to conduct a comprehensive environmental audit of its seven campuses.

Pace is the 10th largest university in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut.

The agreement continues EPA’s national initiative to help institutions of higher learning comply with environmental regulations. EPA Regional Administrator Jane M. Kenny and Pace University President David A. Caputo signed the agreement today at Pace’s Pleasantville, New York campus in one of the university’s laboratories in Dyson Hall.

“Colleges, universities and EPA reap positive results from environmental self audit agreements,” said EPA Regional Administrator Jane M. Kenny. “Pace will put procedures in place to protect people and the environment. The environmental quality on their campuses will improve. The agreement reduces or eliminates financial penalties if violations are disclosed and corrected and EPA resources are used effectively.”

“This agreement with EPA has many benefits,” said Pace University President David A. Caputo. “Students, faculty and staff will witness or practice procedures that protect the environment and safeguard the health of the Pace community. We think our graduates will keep this experience in mind as they pursue their careers.”

Pace University, with an enrollment of more than 14,000 students, has agreed to undertake comprehensive environmental audits, self report any violations, correct deficiencies in its environmental management, and take steps to prevent recurrence of violations. EPA has agreed to waive gravity-based penalties for self-disclosed violations.

The agreement covers all major federal environmental programs including air, water, pesticides, solid and hazardous wastes, hazardous substances and chemicals, environmental response, emergency planning, Community Right-to-Know and toxic substances control. The audit agreement includes all buildings and facilities of Pace University located on seven campuses. Two facilities are in New York City: at One Pace Plaza and 551 5th Avenue; four are in Westchester County: the School of Law and the Evelyn and Joseph Lubin Graduate Center in White Plains, the Pleasantville Campus, and the Briarcliff Campus in Briarcliff Manor; the Hudson Valley Center in New Windsor is in Orange County.

Pace has agreed to audit its facilities by September 30, 2003 and submit its disclosure report to EPA by December 6, 2003. This is EPA’s eighth self-audit agreement with a university in the region. Agreements have been signed with the Rutgers University system in New Jersey, the State University of New York (SUNY), Syracuse University, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, The City University of New York (CUNY), Clarkson University, and Canisius College.

The agreement with Pace is part of EPA’s Colleges and Universities Initiative, which has been in place since 1999. EPA established the initiative because many institutions of higher learning were not aware of their responsibilities under various environmental laws or had failed to implement strategies to comply with them. As part of the initiative, EPA sent letters to 365 colleges and universities in New Jersey, New York, and Puerto Rico, held free workshops to help colleges and universities comply, established a Web site that provides information about their duties under the law, and warned colleges and universities that EPA inspections of their facilities, with the risk of financial penalties, were imminent. EPA attempted to make the institutions aware of the agency’s Voluntary Audit Policy through which institutions can investigate and disclose environmental violations to the Agency and, as a compliance incentive, if the necessary conditions are met, receive a partial or complete reduction in financial penalties.

EPA continues to encourage colleges and universities to participate in the Colleges and Universities Initiative. To date, 27 colleges and universities in New York, New Jersey and Puerto Rico have come forward to disclose more than 50 violations to EPA. Most of them have been granted a 100% waiver of certain penalties totaling more than $2.4 million.

Previous complaints and settlements with penalties totaling approximately $1.5 million have been filed over the past fifteen months against eight colleges and universities in New Jersey and New York. The Colleges and Universities Initiative is an ongoing program with additional investigations anticipated.

More information on EPA’s Voluntary Audit Policy is available at http://www.epa.gov/region02/capp/cip/. The Web site for the Colleges and Universities Initiative is http://www.epa.gov/region02/p2/college/

Urban Ecology: Cities in Transition

In response to a growing number of environmental issues facing urban zones, including ever-increasing sprawl, a geographic disease affecting most local communities throughout the United States, the Pace University Institute for Environmental and Regional Studies (PIERS) will host an all-day conference, “Urban Ecology: Cities in Transition.”

Contacts: Mary E. Horgan, 914-923-2798, mhorgan@pace.edu
Angela Nally, 212-346-1505,agnally@pace.edu

Urban Ecology: Cities in Transition

Pace Institute for Environmental and Regional Studies (PIERS)
to Host Conference, Apr. 11

New York, NY – April 7, 2003 – In response to a growing number of environmental issues facing urban zones, including ever-increasing sprawl, a geographic disease affecting most local communities throughout the United States, the Pace University Institute for Environmental and Regional Studies (PIERS) will host an all-day conference, “Urban Ecology: Cities in Transition.”

Presentations by environmental scholars interested in practical solutions will include models for sustainable cities, urban habitat restoration, issues in urban environmental justice, “footprints,” “shoes” and open space.

Where: Pace University
Downtown Campus (across from City Hall)
One Pace Plaza
Lecture Hall (W614)

When: Friday, April 11, 9:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Schedule on following page.

Journalists are welcome; advance registration appreciated. The conference is open to the public at an admissions fee of $55. For reservations and more information, contact Dr. Robert Chapman, Director, PIERS, at (212) 346-1364, or email rchapman@pace.edu.

Copies of the just-published book containing proceedings from the PIERS 2002, covering topics including ecofeminism, environmental restoration and storyscape and sense of place in Westchester County, are available by contacting Dr. Robert Chapman at rchapman@pace.edu.

The conference is one dimension of Pace University’s aggressive involvement in teaching, research and advocacy on environmental issues, which includes Pace Law School’s highly ranked environmental law program and environmental law clinic; the new Pace Academy for the Environment, which is administering a major project to monitor the health of the Hudson River and is organizing a consortium of Hudson Valley colleges and universities to cross-fertilize environmental teaching and research in the valley; and the Pace Center for Downtown New York (CDNY), which among other activities has sponsored a major conference on the environmental consequences of 9/11.

PIERS is part of the Dyson College of Arts & Sciences which introduced one of the first undergraduate interdisciplinary majors in Environmental Studies in 1996. Faculty and students participating in the program have conducted research in local biodiversity and species preservation, technology transfer, pollution policy, watershed health and local population dynamics. The College also offers a Masters in Environmental Science.

The PIERS mission is to provide leadership in the study of the complex interrelationships between human culture and nature with special emphasis on the Hudson River bioregion and its diverse ecological, social and cultural values. PIERS engages in interdisciplinary, university-wide research dedicated to the production and dissemination of knowledge and solutions to pressing environmental problems, through roundtable discussions, seminar series on regional issues, a visiting scholar program and regional conferences.

Conference Agenda highlights:

9:30-10:00 a.m. Registration, Lecture Hall (W614)

10:00-10:30 a.m. Keynote Speaker, Setha Low, Ph.D. CUNY Graduate Center
Lecture Hall (W614)

10:30-12:00 p.m. SESSION 1 “Social Issues in Sustainability”

10:00-11:30 a.m. SESSION 2 “Urban Sustainability – Reducing the Human Footprint”

10:00-12:00 p.m. SESSION 3 “Open Space and Urban Lawns”

11:30-12:30 PM SESSION 4 “Issues in Environmental Justice”

12:30-1:30 p.m. LUNCH – Faculty Dining Room

1:30 – 3:00 p.m. SESSION 5 “Aesthetics and Place in Urban Environments”

SESSION 6 “Urban Habitat Restoration”

1:30 – 2:30 p.m. SESSION 7 “Environmental Education”

2:30 – 4:00 p.m. SESSION 8 “Central Urban Issues: Water, Transportation and Commodities(Shoes)”

4:30 – 6:30 p.m. RECEPTION – Faculty Dining Room

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart International Airport in New Windsor, New York. More than 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing, and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu

Pace University Celebrates Earth Month

Pace University celebrates earth month on the Pleasantville campus with free events for the community.

Contact: Mary E. Horgan, (914) 923-2798, mhorgan@pace.edu

Pace University Celebrates Earth Month

MEDIA ADVISORY

What: Pace University celebrates earth month on the Pleasantville campus with free events for the community. (See calendar attached).

When: Throughout the month of April, 2003

Where: Pace University, 861 Bedford Road, Pleasantville, NY
914) 773-3200, www.pace.edu

For more information on Earth Month contact: Angelo Spillo, director of the environmental center at (914) 773-3789 or aspillo@pace.edu.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart Airport in New Windsor. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu

EARTH MONTH EVENTS CALENDAR
APRIL 2003

Monday, April 7
ELEPHANTS IN TROUBLE
1:30-3:30 p.m. Kessel Campus Center, Butcher Suite
At least 79 African elephants, most captured in the wild, have died in North American facilities since 1990, and not a single death was from old age. In fact, 95 percent of elephants never even reached age 40, far short of their 70-year life expectancy. Joyce Friedman of In Defense of Animals will speak about Elephants in Trouble; from saving them from extinction to exploiting them in circuses.

Tuesday, April 8
FREE COFFEE
10:30-2:00 p.m. Kessel Campus Center, Cafeteria
Find out how drinking the right cup of Coffee can help save the planet. Find out what shade grown coffee, Fair Trade, and rainforest protection all have in common with Green Mountain Coffee. A raffle drawing will take place at 2:00 p.m. for an incredible gift basket donated by Green Mountain.
This event is sponsored by NATURE, Green Mountain Coffee, and Dining Services.

DOG DAY AFTERNOON/BROWN BAG LUNCH
12:00-1:00 P.M. Kessel Campus Center, Butcher Suite
Because of overpopulation in the region, 6 years ago the Pace Pleasantville campus was inundated with 260 Canada Geese. Their residency caused numerous problems and they balked at all attempts to disperse them. Then along came Dell and Abby and away they went. Attend a herding demonstration to see how these two Border Collies and trainer James Eyring keep the campus “geese free”. Join us for this amazing presentation and watch how the dogs work. Bring a “brown bag” lunch and we’ll provide the refreshments!

Wednesday, April 9
HEALTH FAIR EXHIBITS
11:00-12:00 p.m. Kessel Campus Center, Gottesman Room
Attend the annual Health Fair sponsored by Pace’s Health Care Department and view some of the exhibits dedicated to maintaining a healthy environment. To ensure a healthy personal lifestyle we must maintain a healthy environment.

“STOP THE SEAL HUNT” BAKE SALE
12:00-2:00 p.m. Kessel Campus Center, adjacent to dinning rooms
The money for this bake sale sponsored by NATURE, will be donated to the International Fund for Animal Welfare, and will provide money to help stop the hunting of Canada’s seals. Learn more about this cause and enjoy some home baked goodies.

Friday, April 11
SCIENCE DAY
9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. Kessel Campus Center and surrounding area
Each year Dr. Charlene Hoegler and Dr. William Flank host Science Day which is attended by high school science students and Pace students.

WHERE DID THE LOBSTER GO?
1:00 p.m. Kessel Campus Center
Meet educators from the “Save the Sound” organization and learn about the many concerns facing the waters of the estuary known as the Long Island Sound. Attend “Springcoming” and while enjoying a free lobster lunch, check out the exhibit and learn about the mysterious disappearance of a once strong population of lobster thriving in our local waters. Discover how development pressure has stressed the waters of this marine ecosystem and what can be done to bring it back to health.

Tuesday, April 15
CHOATE POND
ongoing Banks of Choate Pond
Is there anything living in Choate Pond? How did it get there? Learn the answers to these questions and more by viewing the exhibit around the banks of the Pond. This exhibit was designed and constructed by students of ENV 296C as part of a class project.

Tuesday, April 22
HUDSON RIVER SCHOOL PRESENTATION
11:30-12:30 p.m. Kessel Campus Center, Butcher Suite
Learn about and view the works of the Hudson River School of painters. During the late 1900’s these painters brought landscape painting to America. They depicted the natural beauty of the region, and their interpretations brought nature to the hearts and minds of many. Join Professor Mark Cassata for a slide show presentation as he discusses the significance of their work.

Wednesday, April 23
SIX BILLION AND BEYOND
1:30-3:30 p.m. Kessel Campus Center, Butcher Suite
Watch this intriguing film delving into the issue of what many consider to be the single most important global environmental issue….overpopulation. This event is co-sponsored by Philosophy/Religious Studies, Environmental Studies, Women’s Studies, and the Center for Applied Ethics.

HOW GOOD IS YOUR BOTTLED WATER?
3:30-4:00 p.m. Kessel Campus Center, Main Floor
Put your opinion to the test! Is the bottled water you buy “better” than the water coming from your tap? Through a demonstration, Dr. Bill Flank will provide some interesting insights about the quality of bottled water and related environmental issues.

Thursday, April 24
BIRDS OF PREY PROGRAM
7:00-9:00 p.m. Goldstein Health and Fitness Center
Join James Eyring, Assistant Director of the Environmental Center for an unforgettable night with hawks, owls and falcons. Learn about the role these predators serve in a healthy natural community and the Environmental Center’s work with birds of prey. Be prepared as several of these raptors zoom past you in free flight.

Sunday, April 27
COMMUNITY GARDENS PROJECT
Join the Center for Community Outreach by assisting with the Community Gardens Project. Spend some time clearing a green space for residents in a Yonkers neighborhood. Transportation will be provided. For more information contact Heather Novak at hnovak@pace.edu

Tuesday, April 29
HAVE YOU EVER SEEN A TULIP TREE?
11:30-12:15 p.m. Environmental Center
Join members of NATURE, Pace Pleasantville’s environmental club, for their Annual Tree Planting Ceremony, co-sponsored by Activities Fee. This year’s ceremony will include a live Red Tail Hawk, poetry reading, and interesting tree facts.

Governor Pataki and President Caputo Announce the Launch of Pace Academy for the Environment

Governor George E. Pataki and Pace University President David A. Caputo called for a major new commitment on behalf of the environment by institutions of higher education.

New York State Governor George E. Pataki and Pace University President David A. Caputo Announce the Launch of Pace Academy for the Environment

America’s First Riverkeeper John Cronin to head Academy

SLEEPY HOLLOW, N. Y. – November 19, 2002 – Governor George E. Pataki and Pace University President David A. Caputo called for a major new commitment on behalf of the environment by institutions of higher education.

At a press conference today they announced the launch of the Pace Academy for the Environment (PAE). The Academy will be dedicated to utilizing the university’s unique role in human affairs to foster policies, practices and ideas that sustain a mutually enhancing relationship between nature and society.

The Pace Academy seeks to redefine human relations to nature by transforming the Hudson Valley and surrounding regions into an extended interactive classroom and laboratory for education, community service, and intellectual exploration. Among its first initiatives:

§ The Hudson Valley Environmental Consortium of Colleges and Universities will be created by Pace to:

o Encourage other colleges and universities to immerse their considerable resources in the environmental affairs of the world
o Create opportunities for faculty and students across school boundaries
o Increase resources for high school and elementary school teachers
o Create access to intellectual resources for policy makers.

§ Engagement in both practical and theoretical research and the conduct of seminars, symposia and lecture series on environmental issues.

§ A $25,000 annual prize will be given to the individual whose body of work has significantly advanced the role of colleges and universities in relation to nature and society.

“Today’s announcement is about nothing less than the future of our local and global environment and the dependence of that future on the significant role that colleges and universities must begin to play,” said Caputo. “The complexity of the environmental issues is such that they are not simply about technology and science but require the best thinking of cultural experts, social scientists, economists, political experts and philosophers. Where else but the University are these resources so readily available.”

Building on a distinguished history of dedication to the environment and community service, through Pace’s already strong programs in environmental studies, environmental science at the Dyson College of Arts & Sciences, and environmental law at Pace Law School, the Academy will become an active hub connecting all Pace campuses and schools with the broader higher education community to support environmental reform.

John Cronin, Pace resident scholar in environmental studies and former Hudson Riverkeeper, will direct the Academy. His part-time work for the Governor’s Rivers and Estuaries Center will locate in the Academy as well.

“Rivers and estuaries are the place where human settlement meets nature with the most profound, and often disturbing, results. The Hudson is challenged by an interwoven web of ecological, social, cultural and economic issues that requires the interdisciplinary resources and intellectual talent that only colleges and universities can provide,” said Cronin.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart Airport in New Windsor. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School.

Contact: Mary E. Horgan, Pace University, 914-923-2798, mhorgan@pace.edu
Bill Caldwell, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu
Bill Johnson, Halstead Communications, 212-734-2190, Johnson@halsteadpr.com

Pace University to Host Environmental University Day(s) 10/23-24

Pace University will host nearly 300 local high school students from Sleepy Hollow High School, John Jay High School, Woodlands High School, Hastings High School, Suffern High School Horace Greeley High School, Byram Hills High School, Brewster High School, Chester High School, Tuckahoe High School and Roosevelt High School for the annual Environmental University Day(s). This year to accommodate the large number of interested students the University will duplicate the program on two consecutive days, Wed. Oct. 23 and Thurs. Oct. 24, beginning each day at 8:30 a.m. in the Gottesman room of the Kessel Campus Center, on the Pleasantville campus.

University Expands Program to Meet the Demands of Interested High School Students

PLEASANTVILLE, N. Y. – October 17, 2002 – Pace University will host nearly 300 local high school students from Sleepy Hollow High School, John Jay High School, Woodlands High School, Hastings High School, Suffern High School Horace Greeley High School, Byram Hills High School, Brewster High School, Chester High School, Tuckahoe High School and Roosevelt High School for the annual Environmental University Day(s). This year to accommodate the large number of interested students the University will duplicate the program on two consecutive days, Wed. Oct. 23 and Thurs. Oct. 24, beginning each day at 8:30 a.m. in the Gottesman room of the Kessel Campus Center, on the Pleasantville campus.

Environmental University Day, held annually since 2000, is designed especially for high school students wishing to explore environmental issues and concerns that affect their daily lives, the lives of their families and communities, and who wish to take an active role in the future of the environment.

Jeff Main, noted ecologist and field naturalist, will open the day’s events at 9:10 a.m. with, Think Globally…Act Locally: Addressing the Biodiversity Crisis at Home.

“Biodiversity deals with the different populations of organisms that inhabit our biosphere and ways of protecting them to sustain a healthy natural environment,” said Angelo Spillo, director of the Pace Environmental Center. “Our hope is that these students will gain an understanding about how their behaviors including consumption and energy use can have an irreversible impact on these species and the future of their planet.”

The Ethics of Conservation, panel discussion will be moderated by Robert Chapman, professor and coordinator of environmental studies, with panelists Gus Karam, economics and environmental studies and Larry Hundersmarck, philosophy and religious studies.

Field Studies will be held outdoors throughout the campus. Topics include: Where Have All the Natives Gone, What are Female Frogs Like, Surface Water Quality Analysis, The Web of Life, and Stream Insect Identity Search.

Students will also witness a “Birds of Prey” demonstration by Master Falconer James Eyring.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart Airport in New Windsor. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School.

Pace University to Commemorate Earth Week

Global warming, “ECOpreneurship” and civil action will
be among several environmental issues examined in a special Earth Week
Lecture Series presented by Pace University Environmental Center, April
15 – 21.

April 5, 2002

Contact: Mary Horgan
mhorgan@pace.edu
(914) 923-2798

PACE UNIVERSITY TO COMMEMORATE EARTH WEEK

Environmental Center hosts free lecture series

PLEASANTVILLE — Global warming, “ECOpreneurship” and civil action will
be among several environmental issues examined in a special Earth Week
Lecture Series presented by Pace University Environmental Center, April
15 – 21.

The series is free and open to the public. For more information, contact
Angelo Spillo at (914) 773- 3789 or E-mail: aspillo@pace.edu

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS:

“HOW GOOD IS YOUR BOTTLED WATER?”
Monday, April 15, 2:30 – 3:00 p.m. Outside Dining Room A, Pleasantville
Campus
Speaker: Prof. Bill Flank, chemistry

ENVIRONMENTAL READING
Tuesday, April 16, 12:20 – 2:20 p.m. Birnbaum Room, Pleasantville Campus

Reader: Prof. Lori Alward, environmental studies, religion and
philosophy

ENVIRONMENTAL CAREER PANEL
Tuesday, April 16, 3:30 – 4:30 p.m. Butcher Suite, Pleasantville Campus
Speakers: Paul Thiesing NYC DEP and Pace alumni.

CIVIL ACTION PROGRAM
Tuesday, April 16, 6:00 – 8:30 p.m. Butcher Suite, Pleasantville Campus
Speaker: Prof. Robert Goldstein, Pace Law School

“SILVER MILE” FUNDRAISER
Wednesday, April 17, 10:00 – 3:30 p.m., Choate Pond, (in case of rain,
the Gottesman Room, Kessel Campus Center)
Hosts: Pace Environmental Club

INFORMATIONAL TABLES ON “SICK BUILDINGS” AND WILDLIFE DISPLAY
Wednesday, April 17, 12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
Presenters: Pace Health Care Unit and Teatown Lake representatives

TREE PLANTING CEREMONY
Thursday, April 18, 12:00 – 12:30 p.m. In front of Choate House

“GREEN LOGIC” PANEL DISCUSSION/LECTURE
Wednesday, April 18, 12:30 – 1:30 p.m. Butcher Suite
Lecturer: Prof. Robert Isaak, Lubin School of Business

BIRDS OF PREY PRESENTATION
Friday, April 19, 10:00 – 11:00 a.m. Environmental Center, Pleasantville

Campus
Master Falconer: James Eyring

“CARBON DIOXIDE & GLOBAL WARMING: The Hidden Links”
Friday, April 19, 12:00 p.m. Wilcox Hall Auditorium/Gym, Pleasantville
Campus
Presenter: Dr. Taro Takahashi, associate director of Lamont Doherty
Earth Observatory Lab of Colombia University
(This lecture is also part of the Pace Science Day)

YONKERS GREEN SPACE PROJECT
Sunday, April 21, 12:30 – 4:00 p.m. Join the Center for Community
Outreach in celebrating Earth Week by assisting Greyston Foundation
Community Garden’s Project, clearing a green space for residents in a
Yonkers neighborhood. Transportation provided. For more information call
(914) 773-3539 or E-mail: tccoplv@pace.edu

ENVIRONMENTAL BOOK DISPLAY
A display of environmental books will be showcased in the Mortola
Library the entire month of April.

The Pace University Environmental Center, N.A.T.U.R.E. (Pace’s
Environmental Club), Student Government Association, and the faculty and
staff, who volunteered their time, sponsor the events.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New
York City and Westchester County. More than 13,000 students are
enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in
the Dyson College of the Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business,
School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education,
School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

Pace University to Host Conference on Land Use: Planning for a Just and Sustainable Future

Sustainable development in relation to land use, preservation of neighborhoods, use of natural resources, and the impact of industrialization on Westchester urban centers will be some of the issues addressed at the “Land Use: Planning for a Just and Sustainable Future” conference at Pace University on Friday, April 5.

LAND USE: PLANNING FOR A JUST AND SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
Pace University to Host Environmental Conference

PLEASANTVILLE, N. Y. – Sustainable development in relation to land use, preservation of neighborhoods, use of natural resources, and the impact of industrialization on Westchester urban centers will be some of the issues addressed at the “Land Use: Planning for a Just and Sustainable Future” conference at Pace University on Friday, April 5.

Where: Pace University,
The Gottesman Room in the Kessel Campus Center
861 Bedford Rd., Pleasantville, NY (Entrance 3)

When: 9:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m., Friday, April 5, 2002

Agenda:

9:00 a.m. Registration Gottesman Room, Kessel Campus Center

9:30 a.m. Introductory announcements, Gottesman Room, Kessel Campus Center

10:00
-11:30 a.m. Session 1 “Urban Sprawl” in Miller Hall Lecture
Session 2 “Strategies for Sustainability” Goldstein Conference Room. 11:30
-12:20 p.m. Lunch, Gottesman Room

12:30
-2:00 p.m. Session 3 “Environmental Law” Miller Hall Lecture Hall
Session 4 “Case Studies” Goldstein Conference Room
2:00
-3:30 p.m. Session 5 “Philosophy of Place” Miller Hall Lecture
Session 6 “Land Preservation” Goldstein Conference
4:00
-4:15 p.m. Concluding remarks Gottesman Room

4:30
-6:00 p.m. Reception, Butcher Suite

The conference is open to the public at an admissions fee of $35 that includes attendance at 3 sessions and closing reception. For more reservations and more information, contact Dr. Robert Chapman, Director, IERS, at (914) 773-3952 or e-mail rchapman@pace.edu.

The Dyson College of Arts & Sciences’ Institute for Environmental and Regional Studies (IERS) at Pace University and the Federated Conservationists of Westchester County, Inc. co-host the event.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. More than 13,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of the Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

Pace University and the Kitchawan Institute Host Lecture on Solar Power

An environmental lecture titled “Solar Electricity & Building Integrated Photovoltaics: National and
International Innovations in Solar Power” will take place at Pace University’s Pleasantville Campus on Wed, March 27.

March 4, 2002

Contact: Mary Horgan
mhorgan@pace.edu
(914) 923-2798

MEDIA ADVISORY

PACE UNIVERSITY AND THE KITCHAWAN INSTITUTE TO HOST LECTURE ON NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL INNOVATIONS IN SOLAR POWER

What: Environmental Lecture —
“Solar Electricity & Building Integrated Photovoltaics: National and
International Innovations in Solar Power”

Who: Steven J. Strong of Solar Design Associates, Harvard, MA.

When: Wednesday, March 27, 2002 at 7:30 p.m.

Where: Butcher Suite, Pleasantville Campus.
Pace University, 861 Bedford Rd., Pleasantville, NY (Entrance 3)

Steven J. Strong, of Solar Design Associates, Harvard, Massachusetts, is the U.S. representative to the International Energy Agency’s expert working group. Strong was named Time magazine’s “Environmental Hero of the Planet” in 1999 and was awarded the American Solar Energy Society’s lifetime achievement award in 2001. He is the author of The Solar Electric House and Solar Electric Buildings, An Overview of Today’s Applications and the editor and contributing author of Photovoltaics in the Built Environment, a Design Guide for Architects and Engineers as well as contributing author to Photovoltaics in Buildings and Building with Photovoltaics.

The lecture is $20.00. For reservations and more information contact:
Angelo Spillo, Tel: (914) 773-3789

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. More than 13,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of the Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

Pace University Hosts Lecture on Solar Power, Indian Point, and Global Terror

Harvey Wasserman, senior advisor to Greenpeace, USA and activist in the safe energy movement since 1973 will address issues concerning energy and energy deregulation. He has written five books including The Last Energy War: The Battle Against Utility Deregulation and co-authored Killing Our Own: The Disaster of America’s Experience with Atomic Radiation.

March 4, 2002

Contact: Mary Horgan
mhorgan@pace.edu
(914) 923-2798

MEDIA ADVISORY

INTERNATIONALLY KNOWN ACTIVIST, JOURNALIST AND AUTHOR HARVEY WASSERMAN (GREENPEACE) TO ADDRESS SOLAR POWER, INDIAN POINT, AND GLOBAL TERROR AT PACE UNIVERSITY

Who: Harvey Wasserman, Greenpeace Senior Advisor

What: Free lecture – “Indian Point, Enron, and the
Solar Answer to Global Terror”

When: Thursday, March 7, 2002, 11:30am-1:00pm

Where: Butcher Suite, Pleasantville Campus.
Pace University, 861 Bedford Rd., Pleasantville, NY (Entrance 3)

Harvey Wasserman, senior advisor to Greenpeace, USA and activist in the safe energy movement since 1973 will address issues concerning energy and energy deregulation. He has written five books including The Last Energy War: The Battle Against Utility Deregulation and co-authored Killing Our Own: The Disaster of America’s Experience with Atomic Radiation.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. More than 13,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of the Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

Pace Law School Hosts Seminar About New York State’s First Environmental Court

Pace University’s Law School will host a seminar event, Environmental and Land Use Dispute Resolution – Westchester County’s Environmental Court and The Consensus Building Alliance, on Thursday, April 19th. The Honorable Francis A. Nicolai, who is the Administrative Judge for the Ninth Judicial District of the New York State Supreme Court, will speak at the Pace Law School event.

Contact: Anna L. Georgiou
(914) 422-4034
ageorgiou@law.pace.edu

WHITE PLAINS, N. Y. — Pace University’s Law School will host a seminar event, Environmental and Land Use Dispute Resolution – Westchester County’s Environmental Court and The Consensus Building Alliance, on Thursday, April 19th. The Honorable Francis A. Nicolai, who is the Administrative Judge for the Ninth Judicial District of the New York State Supreme Court, will speak at the Pace Law School event.

Westchester is now the location of one of the nation’s first environmental courts. This greatly needed and highly innovative court deals with land use controversies, smart growth, border wars, and open space preservation – all critical issues in the region. Westchester County also boasts the nation’s first program dedicated to mediating land use disputes, an effort to prevent litigation and achieve smarter solutions. Both of these ground-breaking initiatives will be discussed at the Pace event.

Judge Nicolai, who presides over the new Environmental Claims Part, will speak about the efficiencies of a court dedicated to hearing cases involving complex land use and environmental issues and new court procedures. Professor John Nolon, Director of the Law School’s Land Use Law Center will report on what experienced mediators can do in specific cases to avoid litigation.

The seminar is sponsored by the School’s Land Use Law Center and will be held at the Pace Law School campus, 78 North Broadway in White Plains. The event begins at 4 p.m. and will be followed by a reception. The seminar program and reception are open to the public free of charge. Contact for registration is Ann Marie McCoy who can be reached at (914) 422-4262 or amccoy@law.pace.edu.

Judge Nicolai was elected in 1990 as a Justice of the Supreme Court, Ninth Judicial District, and was appointed the Administrative Judge for the district in 1998. Although the Ninth Judicial District encompasses the five counties situated north of New York City, the Environmental Claims Part is established only in Westchester County.

The mediation of land use disputes as an alternative to costly and time-consuming litigation will also be examined. The Land Use Law Center’s Consensus Building Alliance is a consensus-based program designed to resolve divisive land use conflicts in ways that help local leaders build sustainable communities.

The Land Use Law Center at Pace is dedicated to fostering the development of sustainable communities in New York State through training and research projects in the field of land use law. The academic, training, and research activities of the Land Use Law Center engage over forty-five Pace Law students each year.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.