Pace provost Geoff Brackett to moderate April 15 panel on environmental conflicts along the Hudson

The following news release from Columbia University announces a panel on conflicting interests in sustainability, moderated by Pace University’s Provost Geoffrey Brackett and organized by an environmental consortium of which Pace University is the founding member and host institution.

Pace provost Geoff Brackett to moderate April 15 panel on environmental conflicts along the Hudson

The following news release from Columbia University announces a panel on conflicting interests in sustainability, moderated by Pace University’s Provost Geoffrey Brackett and organized by an environmental consortium of which Pace University is the founding member and host institution.

On April 15, from 6:00 to 7:30 p.m., watch the live event webcast. During the event, forward your questions to snpanel@gmail.com. On April 15, 2010, the Earth Institute, Columbia University and the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities will convene a panel discussion on “Navigating Sustainability: The Hudson and Beyond” at Barnard College. The Environmental Consortium brings together representatives from 52 member institutions within the Hudson Valley region, including Columbia, to more fully engage in the region’s environment.

The mission of the consortium is to harness higher education’s intellectual and physical resources to advance ecosystem-based environmental research, teaching, and learning through interdisciplinary and collaborative programs. The panelists come from varied fields and will contribute to the discussion on reconciling different perspectives on sustainability.

According to Margie Turrin, Columbia’s Environmental Consortium representative and education coordinator at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, “Framing the question of how to best move towards a sustainable future begins by examining both the larger concepts that drive our decisions and the behaviors that result from these concepts. We are very pleased to bring together this interdisciplinary panel to lead us in a discussion of how to align often competing ideals to adjust our path forward.”

Stephanie Pfirman, professor of environmental sciences at Barnard and member of the consortium, also weighed in on her reasons for organizing the panel. “How can we balance conflicting interests in deciding on – and then implementing – the ‘best’ course towards sustainability? This panel examines the critical ethical, political, economic, engineering and planning issues that need to be resolved in order to make change happen.”

The event will kick off this year’s River Summer, an intensive faculty development program of the Environmental Consortium. Already in its sixth year, the River Summer program takes faculty in the consortium out onto the Hudson River to analyze the development of the watershed within an interdisciplinary framework. Using the geology, hydrology and landscape of the river as a foundation, River Summer focuses on understanding the Hudson’s natural resources within the context of its cultural history. Place-based field experience is grounded in team teaching and participation among institutions that are geographically and ethnically diverse—from research universities to liberal arts and community colleges. Through River Summer, the Hudson Valley becomes an extended laboratory and classroom, where faculty members can gain new resources to enrich their teaching at their home institutions. A live webcast of the discussion will be available. This exciting format will allow members of the consortium and the public to view the panel from remote locations and submit questions to ask the panelists in real time. Participants can forward questions to snpanel@gmail.com.

The panel will be moderated by Geoffrey L. Brackett, the provost and executive vice president for academic affairs at Pace University. Members of this expert panel include Patricia J. Culligan, Professor of Civil Engineering, Columbia University Theodore J. Eismeier, Professor of Government, Hamilton College Bruce Jennings, Director of Bioethics, Center for Humans and Nature Marilyn Power, Faculty in Economics, Sarah Lawrence College Meg Walker, Vice President, Project for Public Spaces The panel will be held from 6 00 to 7 30 p.m. in the Lehman Auditorium (Room 202), Altschul Hall, Barnard College Campus. If you are interested in attending the event in person, please RSVP to Jane Tipermas at jtipermas@ei.columbia.edu. For more information about the Earth Institute, please visit earth.columbia.edu.

For more information about the Environmental Consortium, please visit www.environmentalconsortium.org

Greenest Communities in Westchester Announced at Pace

Grassroots Environmental Education, a non-profit organization, in partnership with the Pace University Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, announced today the results of a county-wide assessment of the efforts of towns and villages in Westchester County to address key environmental issues.

Green Star AwardsFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts:

Doug Wood, Grassroots Environmental Education (516) 883-0887 or (516) 423-6021

Cara Cea, Pace University, (914) 906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

Greenest Communities in Westchester Win First Green Star Awards

142-Point Evaluation Addresses Local Efforts on Climate Change, Sustainability and Environmental Health

Pleasantville, NY, March 24, 2010 — Grassroots Environmental Education, a non-profit organization, in partnership with the Pace University Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, announced today the results of a county-wide assessment of the efforts of towns and villages in Westchester County to address key environmental issues.

Using a comprehensive checklist developed by Grassroots called “How Green Is My Town?”, over 100 Pace students conducted interviews with municipal, school and business officials of 43 Westchester municipalities from November through early March. The communities with the highest combined scores on 142 widely-accepted attributes of a sustainable and environmentally-aware community will receive Green Star Awards in recognition of their achievements at a ceremony today in Pleasantville.

The six towns receiving Green Star Awards are: Bronxville, Chappaqua, Katonah, Larchmont, White Plains and Yorktown. Survey results for these and all other communities in Westchester have been posted, with recommendations, online at www.HowGreenIsMyTown.org/westchester where the municipalities are rated but not ranked.

Electric vehicle parking?

Pace University is the first to complete a pilot program that Grassroots intends as a model for change on a national level. Students from universities in Nassau and Suffolk counties will be next to complete the assessments of their areas. The pilot program in Westchester was funded in part by Con Ed.

Questions included in the survey ranged from “Does your town provide special incentives for ‘green’ building projects?” to “Does your town recycle e-waste?” and “Does your town offer preferred parking for electric vehicles?”

“We were delighted to find so many of the towns in Westchester out in front on these issues,” says Patti Wood, Executive Director of Grassroots, “but there is always room for improvement. The goal of our program is to help communities share ideas and resources, and to find ways to move ahead on a green agenda even during these tough economic times.”

“Each sector of the community has a vital role to play in making a town truly green,” says Michelle Land, Director of the Pace Academy, and the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges & Universities. “When the local government, school system and business community are working together in a cooperative effort, the results can be innovative and significant.”

Ready-to-go ideas

Grassroots first announced the launch of their comprehensive, science-based web site, www.HowGreenIsMyTown.org last spring. The “greenweb” offers a resource for government agencies and school systems seeking to address key environmental issues, providing links to ready-to-go policies, program ideas and cost-effective solutions. It is designed to give local citizens and decision makers the tools they need to bring about change.

Patti Wood of Grassroots stressed that the evaluation scores for local towns are dynamic, and towns that adopt policies or take other steps to address key issues should contact Grassroots to have their scores updated. An annual review and update of the evaluations is planned. All of the questions, answers, as well as details of every town’s scores, are available online at the web site: www.HowGreenIsMyTown.org/westchester.

About Grassroots Environmental Education

Grassroots Environmental Education is a NY-based not-for-profit 501 (c) (3) organization founded in 2000. Grassroots is dedicated to educating the public about environmental toxins and their impact on human health. Through the production and distribution of science-based materials, the organization seeks to empower individuals to act as catalysts for positive change in their own communities.

About Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies

Pace University Academy for Applied Environmental Studies works with every academic unit of Pace University in a comprehensive program to increase interdisciplinary educational opportunities for students and faculty, expand collaborations and partnerships with external institutions and experts, and create research and advanced study programs on matters of community, national and global import. www.pace.edu/academy

Westchester Communities Need to Continue Programs and Take New Action to Reduce Greenhouse Gases 20%

Westchester County and its municipalities are making progress toward meeting the climate change and sustainability goals set forth in the county’s Action Plan for Climate Change and Sustainable Development, according to a new report.

Pace Contact: Crista Scaturro, (914) 422-4389, cscaturro@law.pace.edu

NYLCVEF Contact: Dan Hendrick (212) 361-6350 ext. 206, dhendrick@nylcv.org

NEWS RELEASE

Report Tracks Progress Of Westchester County and its Municipalities in Meeting Climate Change and Sustainability Goals

Yearlong Study is Culmination of Partnership between Pace Law School CELS and New York League of Conservation Voters Education Fund

WHITE PLAINS, NY – Westchester County and its municipalities are making progress toward meeting the climate change and sustainability goals set forth in the county’s Action Plan for Climate Change and Sustainable Development, according to a new report.

The report – titled “Climate Adaptation and Mitigation: Westchester Responds to the Changing Future” – is the culmination of a yearlong partnership between the Pace Law School Center for Environmental Legal Studies and the New York League of Conservation Voters Education Fund.

The report tracks the progress that Westchester County and its municipalities reported in seven broad sustainability areas of the Westchester Action Plan: greenhouse gas emissions; energy; transportation; land use; funding resources; water resources/stormwater runoff; and solid waste reduction and recycling.

Two-thirds (33 out of 45) of the municipalities responded to the voluntary survey, which was conducted by Pace Law CELS students and NYLCVEF staff. Because adoption of the Action Plan’s recommendations was voluntary, the report aims to show residents and policymakers what their communities are doing and present an opportunity to learn from their neighbors.

“The publication of this report comes at a critical time. From the banks of the Hudson River to the shores of Long Island Sound, it is clear that the risks of not responding to climate change are great for communities in Westchester County,” said Alexandra Dapolito Dunn, Assistant Dean of Environmental Law Programs at Pace University School of Law and its Center for Environmental Legal Studies. “As this report shows, many of Westchester’s local governments are aware of climate change challenges and leading the way toward a more sustainable future.”

Marcia Bystryn, President of the New York League of Conservation Voters Education Fund, said: “The Westchester Action Plan set the bar for sustainability progress in the county. As more residents, municipalities and businesses become aware of what they can do to combat climate change, and realize the economic benefits of greater sustainability, the success of the Action Plan will continue.”

In spring 2008, the Westchester Action Plan for Climate Change and Sustainable Development set a goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions within the county 20 percent by 2015 (from 2005 levels) and 80 percent by 2050. The Action Plan lays out direct and capacity-building actions to achieve this goal by implementing short-, mid- and long-term strategies that engage county and municipal governments, the business sector, educational institutions and individual households.

The Pace Law/NYLCVEF survey shows that progress varies greatly among the goal areas. For example:

• 30 percent of participating municipalities have completed an inventory of their greenhouse gas emissions;

• 52 percent have audited their energy use to identify ways to conserve;

• Three out of four survey participants have programs designed to replace municipal vehicles with more energy-efficient models;

• 83 percent have integrated sustainability into their comprehensive plans;

• Slightly less than half (42 percent) have policies that encourage the use of environmentally sensitive products;

• 100 percent reported they follow best practices to manage stormwater and runoff in order to protect water resources; and

• Slightly more than half (52 percent) have developed plans for waste reduction, recycling and reuse.

The full report can be viewed online at www.nylcvef.org and www.law.pace.edu.

The report concludes that Westchester’s communities will need to continue current programs and take new actions to meet the Action Plan’s short-term goal of a 20 percent reduction in greenhouse gases by 2015.

“Despite the sluggish economy, opportunities do exist to make progress,” said Dean Dunn. “Many of the examples in our report demonstrate that changes to zoning, enforcement or purchasing both reduce greenhouse gas emissions and save taxpayer dollars.”

NYLCVEF President Bystryn added: “This year ushered in new leadership for Westchester County and a number of municipalities. It is up to our new leaders to reaffirm climate reduction goals, preserve past actions and implement new steps that achieve even greater results. The longer government waits to meet the challenges of climate change, the more difficult and expensive it will be to do so down the road.”

Founded in 1976, Pace University School of Law has over 7,000 alumni throughout the country and the world and is consistently ranked among the nation’s top three programs in environmental law. It offers full- and part-time day and evening JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus and offers the Master of Laws degree in Environmental Law, Real Estate Law and Comparative Legal Studies, and a Doctor of Laws in environmental law. The School of Law is part of Pace University, a comprehensive, independent, and diversified university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu

The New York League of Conservation Voters Education Fund (NYLCVEF) engages and educates New Yorkers on environmental issues and the environmental decision-making processes at the local, regional, state and federal government levels. NYLCVEF fosters open, non-partisan discussion on environmental policy and empowers New Yorkers to be effective advocates for the environment. www.nylcvef.org

State of the Union, State of the Stimulus – Pace Offers Case Studies

Pace University today announced that to date it has received eight federal stimulus awards totaling $1.8 million to fund research and community projects at its schools of computing, education, nursing, and law. Pace has submitted 32 stimulus proposals, of which we have received eight to date. The eight awards are:

Efficient energy for the environment. An enlarged Northeast Clean Energy Application Center to promote co-generation and other high efficiency, low emission power systems will be the result of the largest grant. The Pace Energy and Climate Center at Pace Law School will share $952,000 from the U.S. Department of Energy with the Center for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy at the University of Massachusetts.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts: Pace Public Information: Bill Caldwell, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu, or Chris Cory, 212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY WINS $1.8 MILLION IN STIMULUS FUNDING

Projects involve

• green energy for the Northeast US,

• help for NYC’s Chinatown,

• new teaching methods

• mentoring for urban service careers

• nursing scholarships for disadvantaged students

• a NYC entrepreneurship website

New York, NY, January 27, 2010 –– Pace University today announced that to date it has received eight federal stimulus awards totaling $1.8 million to fund research and community projects at its schools of computing, education, nursing, and law. Pace has submitted 32 stimulus proposals, of which we have received eight to date. The eight awards are:

Efficient energy for the environment. An enlarged Northeast Clean Energy Application Center to promote co-generation and other high efficiency, low emission power systems will be the result of the largest grant. The Pace Energy and Climate Center at Pace Law School will share $952,000 from the U.S. Department of Energy with the Center for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy at the University of Massachusetts.

The Northeast region has significant potential for supplying alternative clean energy technologies like combined heat and power generation (“cogeneration”), waste heat recovery systems, and district energy systems. Besides environmental benefits, using less energy and other efficiencies will reduce the dollars flowing out of the region to pay for energy. The center serves New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine.

The clean energy center also received $55,027 from the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) to help with a 2009 conference that identified market based strategies to achieve energy conservation and a cleaner environment.

The Principal Investigator is Thomas G. Bourgeois, the deputy director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center, tbourgeois@law.pace.edu.

Relief to NYC Downtown and, Chinatown. Pace’s Community and Volunteer Mobilization AmeriCorps Program received $347,403 through New York State to deepen and broaden its service to needy and vulnerable people in New York City’s Downtown and Chinatown communities. Schools and nonprofit organizations there have been pinched by the economic crisis, and the grant will help place Pace students in after-school programs and as classroom assistants, tutors, college counselors, and instructors in English and US citizenship. The students are recruited for a year of service and learning by Pace’s Dyson Center for Undergraduate Research Experiences, working closely with the Pace Office of Co-op and Career Services.

The Principal Investigator is Professor Maria Iacullo-Bird, Executive Director of the Pace Center for Undergraduate Research Experiences, miacullobird@pace.edu.

Collaborative groups for teacher learning. Teaching based on inquiries raised and researched by high school students is increasing in US schools. To help teachers learn this methodology, Pace’s School of Education received $261,870 to partner with four secondary schools it partners with — Pace High School and Millennium High School in New York City, and Peekskill High School and Sleepy Hollow High School in Westchester County. Facilitators from the School of Education are meeting 15 times during the current school year with groups from the schools to develop the schools’ capacity to create, implement and evaluate collaborative groups of their own in which teachers raise inquiries. The project will culminate in a Teaching and Learning Conference for all stakeholders.

The Principal Investigators are Professors Christine Clayton and James Kilbane, cclayton@pace.edu and jkilbane@pace.edu. The funds come through the New York State Education Department Teacher/Leader Quality Partnership Programs.

Mentoring for urban service careers. Pace undergraduate and graduate students who are planning educationally-related urban careers in teaching, psychology, and speech pathology are getting personalized mentoring via a grant of $74,432 through the New York State Education Department to Pace’s Teacher Opportunity Corps. To improve the students’ success and retention, the program is offering personalized tutoring in service learning and instructional technology, and in career-related decision-making in areas like writing academic projects and grant applications, applying for scholarships, and career planning. Qualified participants also get stipends and undergraduate seminar credits.

The Principal Investigator is professor Mary Rose McCarthy, mmccarthy2@pace.edu.

Expanded nursing scholarships and loans. Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing received $15,256 (in part from Stimulus funds) from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration to offer scholarships to disadvantaged nursing students. The same agency also awarded the school $52,414 for its Nurse Faculty Loan Program, a loan fund for full and part-time students working toward an MA in Nursing Education. Recipients who complete the program may cancel up to 85% of their NFLP loan if they serve for four consecutive years as a full-time faculty member at a school of nursing.

Principal Investigator for the scholarships is professor Susan Gordon, sgordon@pace.edu; for the loan fund it is professor Marilyn Jaffe-Ruiz, mjafferuiz@pace.edu.

A New York City entrepreneurship website. Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems and its Pace Web Solutions Development Team received $90,000 to help the New York City Economic Development Corporation create a centralized Web portal for entrepreneurs. The portal will showcase New York as a center of entrepreneurial opportunity and become a go-to site providing information, resources and contact points for start-ups, entrepreneurs and investors of all sizes. The Pace team of technologists, Web developers and entrepreneurs will serve as a consulting group on the portal’s architecture and content, identifying the best available Web technologies.

The Principal Investigator is Professor Jonathan Hill, jhill@pace.edu, with Professors Bruce Bachenheimer and Claudia Green.

Overall assessment

“We are very pleased with the opportunistic faculty members who have taken advantage of the uniqueness of this generous funding to support the University’s many efforts to help stimulate the economy,” said Victor Goldsmith, Associate Provost for Sponsored Research and Economic Development at Pace. “Our students and faculty members are working hard on a variety of projects, and we hope to continue securing additional stimulus funds with them in the current federal fiscal year.”

To date Pace has submitted 32 stimulus proposals, of which 16 are still pending. The process for new stimulus proposal submissions is expected to end in September 2010.

About Pace

For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter | Flickr | YouTube .

Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Academy for Applied Environmental Studies Appoints Science Journalist Andrew Revkin Senior Fellow

Andrew C. Revkin, one of the United States’ most eminent science reporters, is becoming Senior Fellow for Environmental Understanding at Pace University’s new interdisciplinary Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies.

Contact: Chris Cory, Pace Public Information, 212-346-1117, 212-979-8463, ccory@pace.edu

Andrew Revkin, eminent science journalist, to become Senior Fellow for Environmental Understanding at Pace University

Appointment to new Academy for Applied Environmental Studies builds on University’s environmental leadership

New York, NY, December 14, 2009 – Andrew C. Revkin, one of the United States’ most eminent science reporters, is becoming Senior Fellow for Environmental Understanding at Pace University’s new interdisciplinary Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies.

Revkin will be leaving The New York Times when he returns from his current assignment covering the Copenhagen summit on climate change, and will begin teaching when the spring term begins in late January.

“We are extremely pleased that Andy Revkin is joining what we believe is one of the strongest university environmental programs in the nation,” said Geoffrey Bracket Brackett, DPhil (Oxon.), the University’s Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs. “His intellectual expertise and ethical balance will make enormous contributions to helping the Pace Academy in its aim to be a global resource for policy development.”

The Pace Academy is a University-wide center with internationally known faculty members who concentrate on national and global environmental issues such as the water crisis and climate change.

Pace awarded Revkin an honorary doctorate in 2007.

Green expertise. Over the years Pace has become well known for environmental education. The Pace Law School’s environmental program is consistently ranked among the top three in the US. The law school’s Environmental Legal Clinic, co led by Professors Robert F. Kennedy Jr. and Karl Coplan, trains environmental lawyers who, while still students, have set national precedents in a number of cases involving the Hudson River. This fall Pace Law launched the first curriculum in the nation entirely dedicated to climate change, offered within the school’s Masters of Environmental Law (LLM) program.

Revkin will be joining a host of nationally-known environmentalists who are part of the Pace faculty and the Academy, Brackett said.

They include John Cronin, the Academy’s Senior Fellow for Environmental Policy, who first came to public attention as the Hudson Riverkeeper and now also directs the Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries; Nicholas Robinson, University Professor for the Environment, one of the founders of international environmental law; Professor Robert Chapman, an environmental philosopher who directs the undergraduate Environmental Studies program and the Pace Institute for Environmental and Regional Studies; and Richard Schlesinger, an environmental toxicologist who oversees the Environmental Science BS and MS programs. Pace’s science curriculum is especially strong in issues underlying environmental assessment, policy, and communication.

In the last decade Pace University spearheaded formation of the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities, an organization of more than 50 campuses in the Hudson watershed that collaborates on environmental studies and teaching.

Copenhagen presence. In Copenhagen, the Pace presence includes the former US Congressman and dean emeritus of Pace Law School, Richard Ottinger, a delegate for the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, one of the largest global environmental nongovernmental organizations, who is blogging about the global climate change negotiations. Two Pace Law School Doctor of Juridical Science students are delegates, from the Marshall Islands and Pakistan, and a student in the school’s joint master’s program with the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies is serving as an observer.

Revkin published one of the first journalistic reports on global warming 21 years ago. His degree citation said “One of his specialties is revealing how slowly-building risks such as global warming and the loss of species could transform the planet, but in ways hard to perceive in the rush of daily experience.”

The citation added: “He has melded scientific information with coverage of the politics that influence both damage and prevention.” His first book, on the slain leader of a movement to protect the Amazon basin, was the basis of an HBO film, which won three Golden Globes and two Emmy awards. An amateur musician who performs on fiddle, guitar, mandolin and vocals in a country folk-blues band, his New York Times profile of a heavy-metal singer was the basis for the 2001 movie “Rock Star.”

Sustainability and population. Now, Revkin has said, he wants to think and write about “the role of journalism in the larger world of environmental communication – how information matters in terms of policy and behavior.” He is starting what will be his third book for adults, about the interlinked issues of sustainability and population, and finishing the second of two books for children on environmental issues. The first has the ironic title “The North Pole Was Here.”

A full description of Revkin’s journalistic career was published today by the Columbia Journalism Review.

For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook – Pace University News | Twitter @PaceUNews| Flickr | YouTube. Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Pace Senior Environmental Fellow John Cronin Honored in New Book on His Work

For 35 years John Cronin has been at the heart of saving the Hudson River ecosystem, a role model for environmental efforts around the nation. But he has not been alone. In this new collection of essays, a range of writers — among them scientists, activists, scholars and clergymen — describe Cronin’s life and work, offering a unique glimpse into his extraordinary contribution to protecting our water resources.

Contacts:

Chris Cory, Pace Public Information, 212-346-1117, 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

Michelle Land, Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, 914-422-4076, mland@law.pace.edu

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Review copies and photos available on request

Life and work of John Cronin, “Hero for the Planet” and Pace University Senior Fellow in Environmental Affairs, celebrated in new anthology

Contributions by Pete Seeger, Robert F. Kennedy Jr., Maurice Hinchey and others

A River’s Pleasure: Essays in Honor of John Cronin Edited by Michelle D. Land and Susan Fox Rogers Pace University Press; Publication date December 7, 2009 ISBN: 0-944473-96-2, Pages: 185, Price $40.00 Professional educator discount of $32 if ordered from the publisher

NEW YORK, NY, December 4, 2009 – For 35 years John Cronin has been at the heart of saving the Hudson River ecosystem, a role model for environmental efforts around the nation. But he has not been alone. In this new collection of essays, a range of writers — among them scientists, activists, scholars and clergymen — describe Cronin’s life and work, offering a unique glimpse into his extraordinary contribution to protecting our water resources.

“A River’s Pleasure” (Pace University Press, $40.00), an intimate and thought-provoking book, offers readers an episodic narrative of a pioneering and influential part of the modern environmental movement, including a look forward into its future.

“A River’s Pleasure” contains 21 pieces of writing that range from an exclusive interview with Pete Seeger to an in-depth profile by The New Yorker writer Alec Wilkinson and an insightful essay from Nicholas Robinson, a globally recognized architect of international environmental law and a Pace law professor. The contributors also include John Horgan, a former senior writer at Scientific American, Anthony DePalma, formerly of The New York Times, an IBM executive, a photo-essayist, an archeologist trying to keep looters away from eight-acre Magdalen Island, and a shad fishing riverman who recalls a cleaner river.

The volume was produced by Pace’s new, interdisciplinary Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, where Cronin is Senior Fellow in Environmental Affairs. He is also Director and CEO of the Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries.

Geoffrey L. Brackett, Pace’s Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs, describes Cronin in the book’s foreword as “the perfect combination of arrogance, brilliance, charm and ingenuity” for environmental crusading. Cronin is the politically shrewd visionary who first came to national attention during the years between 1983 and 2000 when he was the Hudson Riverkeeper. Robert F. Kennedy Jr., who became the group’s attorney, recalls how he and Cronin “donned waders and spent weeks walking riverbanks, climbing fences, crawling up pipes and taking samples, and we sat all night on lawn chairs waiting for midnight dumpers….”

But one title does not suffice to characterize John Cronin’s work; as the essays in this collection testify, he has astonishing range and depth. Editor Michelle Land, a Pace professor of environmental policy who is Director of the Pace Academy, writes in her introduction of how the book reveals his “restlessness, continual reinvention” and his role as a “never-ending source of big ideas.”

Cronin’s current focus is environmental problem solving by fostering cooperation at the intersection of policy and innovation – as described by Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman, “the evolution of John’s focus on the Hudson River has incorporated the whole evolution of environmental regulation.”

Emergent ideas described in the book include real-time environmental monitoring analyzed by computer, other intensified uses of science and engineering, increased collaboration with newly green-minded businesses, and a proposed environmental amendment to the US Constitution.

Susan Fox Rogers, co-editor of the book and Visiting Associate Professor of Writing at Bard College writes of Cronin: “In some ways, what he is remains without easy definition. He occupies a unique territory that mixes activist, teacher, and environmentalist…. Like a kid full of hope, the future, not the past is where John lives.”

The book is available at Amazon.com or through Pace University Press.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube. Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

A River’s Pleasure: Essays in Honor of John Cronin Edited by Michelle D. Land and Susan Fox Rogers Imprint: Pace University Press. ISBN: 0-944473-96-2. Publication date December 1, 2009. Pages: 185. Price $40 ($32 professional educator discount if ordered from the publisher).

Wed, Oct 28 at 2:30 Event – Dan Bena, PepsiCo – Why It’s Good Business To Be Green

“Delivering Performance with Purpose: the PepsiCo Journey” Hear first-hand about PepsiCo’s commitment to leaving a positive imprint on society –– directly from Dan Bena, who plays a critical role in PepsiCo’s international sustainability efforts.

PepsiCo takes the “environmental challenge” and finds it’s good business to be green … for the company, its people and the world.

MEDIA ADVISORY Wednesday, October 28 at 2:30 PM, Pace University, NYC

FREE Event, OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

“Delivering Performance with Purpose: the PepsiCo Journey” Hear first-hand about PepsiCo’s commitment to leaving a positive imprint on society –– directly from Dan Bena, who plays a critical role in PepsiCo’s international sustainability efforts.

Who/Speaker: Dan Bena is currently the Director of Sustainability, Health, Safety, and Environment for the international division of PepsiCo, serving as a liaison between technical functions, government affairs, public policy, and field operations to develop key messaging related to sustainable development to internal and external stakeholder groups. This year he was appointed to the Steering Committee of the United Nations CEO Water Mandate, and also serves on the Mandate’s working group for Water as a Human Right. Dan chairs the Water Resources Committee of American Beverage Association, and has been active in the International Society of Beverage Technologists (ISBT), as an elected board member, founder and Chair of the Emerging Scientific Interests Subcommittee, and—most recently—founder and Co-chair of the Subcommittee for Sustainable Development. Bena also serves on the board-sponsored Public Health Committee of the Safe Water Network, which is a not-for-profit organization for which PepsiCo was a founding member, dedicated to advancing sustainable, community-level solutions to provide safe drinking water in developing economies.

When: Wednesday, October 28, 2009 at 2:30 pm

Where: Pace University, One Pace Plaza, Downtown New York City Campus (just East of City Hall), Multipurpose Room

About Performance with Purpose: PepsiCo’s commitment to sustainable growth is focused on generating healthy financial returns while giving back to communities the company serves. This includes meeting consumer needs for a broad array of choices for healthy, convenient and fun nourishment; reducing the company’s impact on the environment through water, energy and packaging initiatives; and supporting its employees through a diverse and inclusive culture that recruits and retains world-class talent.

Event Sponsor: The Center for Global Business Programs at Pace’s Lubin School of Business, whose mission is to enhance the global capabilities of students and faculty by providing high-quality academic and professional experiences, facilitating learning, and supporting applied research in the global environment.

Media RSVP: Samuella Becker, Pace University, Public Information, sbecker2@pace.edu or 212-346-1637 (office); 917-734-5172 (cell).

About Pace. For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter | Flickr | YouTube. Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Wed, Oct 28 at 2:30 Event – Dan Bena, PepsiCo – Why It’s Good Business To Be Green

PepsiCo takes the “environmental challenge” and finds it’s good business to be green … for the company, its people and the world.

PepsiCo takes the “environmental challenge” and finds it’s good business to be green … for the company, its people and the world.

MEDIA ADVISORY Wednesday, October 28 at 2:30 PM, Pace University, NYC

FREE Event, OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

“Delivering Performance with Purpose: the PepsiCo Journey” Hear first-hand about PepsiCo’s commitment to leaving a positive imprint on society –– directly from Dan Bena, who plays a critical role in PepsiCo’s international sustainability efforts.

Who/Speaker: Dan Bena is currently the Director of Sustainability, Health, Safety, and Environment for the international division of PepsiCo, serving as a liaison between technical functions, government affairs, public policy, and field operations to develop key messaging related to sustainable development to internal and external stakeholder groups. This year he was appointed to the Steering Committee of the United Nations CEO Water Mandate, and also serves on the Mandate’s working group for Water as a Human Right. Dan chairs the Water Resources Committee of American Beverage Association, and has been active in the International Society of Beverage Technologists (ISBT), as an elected board member, founder and Chair of the Emerging Scientific Interests Subcommittee, and—most recently—founder and Co-chair of the Subcommittee for Sustainable Development. Bena also serves on the board-sponsored Public Health Committee of the Safe Water Network, which is a not-for-profit organization for which PepsiCo was a founding member, dedicated to advancing sustainable, community-level solutions to provide safe drinking water in developing economies.

When: Wednesday, October 28, 2009 at 2:30 pm

Where: Pace University, One Pace Plaza, Downtown New York City Campus (just East of City Hall), Multipurpose Room

About Performance with Purpose: PepsiCo’s commitment to sustainable growth is focused on generating healthy financial returns while giving back to communities the company serves. This includes meeting consumer needs for a broad array of choices for healthy, convenient and fun nourishment; reducing the company’s impact on the environment through water, energy and packaging initiatives; and supporting its employees through a diverse and inclusive culture that recruits and retains world-class talent.

Event Sponsor: The Center for Global Business Programs at Pace’s Lubin School of Business, whose mission is to enhance the global capabilities of students and faculty by providing high-quality academic and professional experiences, facilitating learning, and supporting applied research in the global environment.

Media RSVP: Samuella Becker, Pace University, Public Information, sbecker2@pace.edu or 212-346-1637 (office); 917-734-5172 (cell).

About Pace. For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter | Flickr | YouTube. Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Pace Law Dean Emeritus and Nationally Known Environmentalist Richard Ottinger Receives Green Award

In celebration of his lifetime achievements in working to improve the environment, Richard Ottinger, Dean Emeritus of Pace Law School, will be honored by the Federated Conservationists of Westchester County (FCWC) at its annual fall benefit reception on Saturday, October 17, from 5:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at a private “green” home on Long Island Sound.

Posted on behalf of Pace Law School – Contact: Regina Pappalardo – 914-422-4268; rpappalardo@law.pace.edu

PACE LAW SCHOOL DEAN EMERITUS RICHARD OTTINGER HONORED WITH GREEN LEGACY AWARD AT FALL BENEFIT RECEPTION OF THE FEDERATED CONSERVATIONISTS OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY

WHITE PLAINS, NY, October 14, 2009 – In celebration of his lifetime achievements in working to improve the environment, Richard Ottinger, Dean Emeritus of Pace Law School, will be honored by the Federated Conservationists of Westchester County (FCWC) at its annual fall benefit reception on Saturday, October 17, from 5:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at a private “green” home on Long Island Sound.

Dick Ottinger’s life has been dedicated to environmental protection and energy conservation. Prior to joining the Pace faculty, he served for 16 years in the U.S. Congress, chairing the House Subcommittee on Energy, Conservation and Power. He is currently Dean Emeritus and Professor of Law at Pace Law School in White Plains, N.Y., where he taught environmental law and was Dean from 1994-1999. As co-director of the Center for Environmental Legal Studies, he started the Energy Project (now the Pace Energy and Climate Center), which raises $900,000 per year, advocating utility investment in conservation and renewable energy resources.

Ottinger is a nationally known environmentalist. Hunter Lovins, a renowned champion of sustainable development who this week has been the first Visiting Fellow in Residence at Pace University’s Pace Academy of Applied Environmental Studies, said Tuesday that as an advocate and legislator, Ottinger “was responsible for most of the legislation that now allows environmentalists to do their work.”

Pace Law School’s Environmental Law program has been consistently ranked among the top three in the nation (US News & World Report) and the school is the first law school in the nation to offer a course of study focused on climate change law, which is included as a specialty “track” as part of its Master of Laws in Environmental Law.

Serving as an ideal location, the “green” home at which the reception will take place features solar panels and a geo-thermal energy system. The event will feature several additional green aspects: a silent auction that includes local “green” products and services; recycled paper invitations; and hors d’ oeuvres catered by The Flying Pig, a local caterer that focuses on local, sustainable offerings.

Marian Rose, founder and former president of Croton Watershed Clean Water Coalition (CWCWC) will also be honored at the event. For questions or information on attending the event, the public can call the FCWC office at (914) 422-4053 or email Adiel at fcwc@fcwc.org.

Federated Conservationists of Westchester County Inc. was founded in 1965 as a nonprofit coalition of dozens of local environmental groups to form a strong, single voice for combating pollution and preserving Westchester’s many precious natural resources. FCWC has promoted environmentally sound planning and decision making throughout the region and educated the public and government officials on the need to protect natural resources. As the premier environmental watchdog in Westchester, the organization has influenced local, county and state governments in the defense of air, water and land.

Founded in 1976, Pace Law School (www.law.pace.edu) has over 7,500 alumni throughout the country and the world. It offers full- and part-time day and evening JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus. With its Environmental Law program consistently ranked among the top three in the nation (US News & World Report), the school also offers the Master of Laws in Environmental Law, Real Estate Law and in Comparative Legal Studies and an SJD in Environmental Law. Pace is also the first law school in the nation to offer a course of study focused on climate change law, which is included as a specialty “track” as part of its Master of Laws in Environmental Law. The School of Law is part of a comprehensive, independent and diversified University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.pace.edu

Hunter Lovins, renowned champion of sustainable development, to speak at Pace on Oct. 13 and 14

“Business case for climate protection” to be presented by Hunter Lovins, renowned champion of sustainable development, at Pace University campuses in White Plains, Pleasantville Tuesday and Wednesday, Oct. 13 and 14 -part of four-day resident fellowship at Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies

Contact: Chris Cory, 212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

Note: Print quality version of photos of Lovins can be downloaded from: http://www.natcapsolutions.org/media.htm#images. She will be available for photos and interviews.

“Business case for climate protection” to be presented by Hunter Lovins, renowned champion of sustainable development, at Pace University campuses in White Plains, Pleasantville Tuesday and Wednesday, Oct. 13 and 14

Part of four-day resident fellowship at Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies

WHITE PLAINS, NY, October 9, 2009 — “It is no accident that the companies in the Dow Jones Sustainability Index outperform the general market.”

So says Hunter Lovins, the globally-known environmentalist who has been dubbed a millennium “hero of the planet” by Time Magazine for her charismatic advocacy of practical steps that businesses and governments can use to solve environmental problems. Lovins will be a Council of Independent Colleges/Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow in residence at Pace University’s Academy for Applied Environmental Studies from Monday to Thursday of next week. As part of her fellowship she will deliver two free public presentations:

• Tuesday, October 13, 5-6 pm: “Drivers of Change: The Business Case for Climate Protection and the Role of Law,” Pace Law School, Tudor Room, 78 North Broadway, White Plains

• Wednesday, October 14, 12:20-1:15 pm, “The Business Case for Sustainability and Climate Protection,” Pace Pleasantville Campus, Butcher Suite, Kessel Student Center, 861 Bedford Road, Pleasantville.

In 2002 Lovins founded Natural Capitalism Inc. and Natural Capitalism Solutions, a nonprofit in Eldorado Springs, Colorado, of which she is president. The organization educates “senior decision-makers” in business, government and civil society about the principles of sustainability, and develops concrete implementation strategies for companies, communities and countries.

Royal Dutch/Shell consultant

Lovins, who is trained as a lawyer, also was co-founder of the Rocky Mountain Institute, an influential environmental research and consulting center. She is co-author of nine books, including a “Climate Protection Manual for Cities” (2006), has appeared on media ranging from “60 Minutes” to Pat Robertson’s “700 Club,” and has consulted to companies and organizations including the Government of Afghanistan, the US. Environmental Protection Agency, Bank of America and Royal Dutch/Shell Group.

During her fellowship at the Pace Academy, Lovins also will visit classes and exchange ideas with Pace students and faculty members from many parts of the university, including law, arts and sciences, business, and the Honors Program at the Lubin School of Business. Seminars and discussions will include such topics as legal education, business strategy, green entrepreneurship, and economic development in Afghanistan.

Shareholder value of green

Lovins argues that environmentally sustainable practices enhance shareholder value through reduced costs and risks, and increased innovation, productivity, and market share. “Green” companies, she bluntly states, can “make more money.”

Nationally and internationally, Lovins says “unsustainable business practices contributed to the economic collapse,” but “saving energy strengthens the entire economy.”

Michelle Land, the Director of the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, noted: “Through collaboration and good business sense, Hunter Lovins has advanced the understanding of the need for green practices and products — and she has developed practical ways businesses can achieve them. Through her interdisciplinary approach and community-level involvement, she exemplifies the kind of applied study that is at the heart of Pace Academy’s mission.”

Widely known for its diverse environmental teaching and research, for 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter | Flickr | YouTube

Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV