WNYC: “The Global Salon: Cities in Brazil” – An Evening of Conversation and Performance

On December 9, “The Global Salon: Cities in Brazil” will examine the country’s astounding transformation in economic prosperity and global infrastructure. Among the featured panelists is Lubin’s Claudia Green, who has made 18 trips to Brazil in the past 11 years, initiating projects in the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest and Rio de Janeiro.

The Global Salon: Cities in Brazil

In collaboration with PEN World Voices Festival

Friday, December 9, 2011 at 7:00 PM
Duration: 1 hour, 30 minutes
Tickets: $20.00

The Global Salon: Brazil will examine the country’s astounding transformation in economic prosperity and global infrastructure navigated by New York Public Radio Host Eddie Robinson.

The evening includes Conversation and Performance with:

Larry Rohter, Award-winning journalist; New York Times Culture Reporter; former Newsweek correspondent and New York Times bureau chief for the Rio de Janeiro office; author of “Brazil on the Rise”

Helio Alves, Pianist and composer Helio Alves has received high praise as an in-demand sideman with Joe Henderson, Yo-Yo Ma, Slide Hampton, Airto Moreira and Flora Purim, Paquito D’Rivera, Claudio Roditi, Oscar Castro-Neves and Gato Barbieri, to name but a few. And now, with more than 40 recordings as a sideman – and two at the helm of his own ensembles – this incomparable musician is quite deservedly earning respect as a leader too.

Claudia G. Green, Executive Director/Associate Professor, Center for Global Business Programs at Pace University, Lubin School of Business; organizer of “Rio Green Map” initiative on sustainable development in preparation for Rio+20, World Cup 2014, and Olympics 2016; leader of  ‘Amigos Digitais,’ a non-profit that links students in the favellas of Rio with students in the Lower East Side of NYC for cultural and educational exchange

Béco Dranoff, Award-winning music/film producer — Red Hot + Rio; the documentary, “Beyond Ipanema;” and Brazilian radio show, Sonoridade

Nilson Matta, considered one of the greatest bass players in the world and since his arrival in New York in 1985 he has become the first call of many of the top US musicians. Nilson studied bass at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) with Sandrino Santoro, Brazil’s premier classical bass player. Since his arrival in New York 1985 he has become the first call of many of the top US musicians. His mastery of the instrument and unique sound have earned him a reputation as one of the industry’s most sought after players. Throughout his career, Matta has been the “go to” bassist for numerous top musicians from around the globe.

Lidia Santos, was born in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where she received a B.A. in Literatures of Portuguese Language from the University of Rio de Janeiro –UFRJ. Her Ph.D in Spanish American Literature was received from the University of São Paulo –USP. Before arriving at the Graduate Center, Prof. Santos taught at Yale University and at the Federal Fluminense University –UFF, in Brazil.

Venue: A new destination for artists and audiences, The Greene Space was created for live performances, signature WNYC radio shows and video webcasts — with concerts, audio theatre, political and cultural discussions, visual arts, public radio events and more.  It is located on the ground floor of WNYC’s new home at 44 Charlton Street (at Varick Street).

NEWS RELEASE: Students from Award-Winning Course “Producing the Documentary” to Screen New Film About Sustainable Shrimp Farming in Belize

A new documentary, “Linda Thornton: Seeking Sustainability, One Shrimp at a Time,” filmed by a team of Pace University students explores the life of a resilient, pioneering aquaculture entrepreneur as she pushes the frontiers of sustainable shrimp farming in Belize. The 17 minute film is being released on several web sites this week. The premiere screening is set for Thursday, May 19 at 3:00pm, Pace University, 861 Bedford Rd., Pleasantville, entrance two, Lienhard Lecture Hall, 3rd floor. Andrew Revkin, New York Times Dot Earth blogger and Senior Fellow for Environmental Understanding at the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, will speak about the making of the film and his role in it. The student filmmakers and their professor will be on hand as well. The event is free and open to the public.

From seafood markets and plush restaurants of Manhattan to the ponds and breeding tanks of Belize’s shrimp farms, “Linda Thornton: Seeking Sustainability, One Shrimp at a Time” explores efforts to farm shrimp with the environment in mind

Meet student filmmakers at the public premiere Thursday, May 19 at 3:00pm, Pace University, Pleasantville, entrance 2, Lienhard Lecture Hall; New York Times Dot Earth blogger and Senior Fellow for Environmental Understanding at Pace, Andrew Revkin to speak

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, May 12, 2011 – In a new documentary, “Linda Thornton: Seeking Sustainability, One Shrimp at a Time,” a team of Pace University student filmmakers explores the life of a resilient, pioneering aquaculture entrepreneur as she pushes the frontiers of sustainable shrimp farming in Belize.

The 17-minute film is being released on several web sites this week. The premiere screening is set for Thursday, May 19 at 3:00pm, Pace University, 861 Bedford Rd., Pleasantville, entrance two, Lienhard Lecture Hall, 3rd floor. Andrew Revkin, New York Times Dot Earth blogger and Senior Fellow for Environmental Understanding at the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, will speak about the making of the film and his role in it. The student filmmakers and their professor will be on hand as well. The event is free and open to the public. Media admission by press pass.

Linda Thornton is the quintessential innovator, but with a deep green streak — overcoming daunting personal and technical challenges to fulfill a lifelong dream of farming a staple of the global middle class diet, shrimp, while cutting environmental impacts.

In the film students in the award-winning Pace University course “Producing the Documentary” tell Thornton’s story, which over three decades takes her from early experiments with urban indoor shrimp farming in Chicago to hard-won success in Belize, a country aiming to build its economy without harming its extraordinary natural assets – particularly its coastal mangrove forests and coral reefs.

Undaunted by a boating accident that in 1994 took the lives of her husband and two other men and left her partially paralyzed, Thornton rebuilt her body and her early Belizean farming business.

After initial confrontations with environmental groups fighting a wave of shrimp farm development that was damaging coastal ecosystems from Asia to the Americas, Thornton, together with Tim Smith, a biologist working for the World Wildlife Fund, refined methods for controlling feed and water that dramatically cut pollution.

Their collaboration is part of a move within the shrimp aquaculture industry toward standards that could soon give shoppers the option of buying shrimp that are certified as sustainably raised.

Thornton, still in pain from her injuries long ago, now works at three different shrimp farms in Belize, one of which is her own Cardelli Farms, named for her father. She has also been a leader in improving labor practices in the industry.

In the film, Smith describes Thornton as gritty and creative and a natural bridge builder between the aquaculture industry and conservationists.

“She is one of the toughest and most competent people I have met,” Smith says. “Just a person that’s barely able to walk some mornings and she gets up and … runs a thousand acres of shrimp farms and then comes home and then runs her own farm. That’s not a trivial thing. There are hulls of businesses that were not able to do that all around her, all around Belize.”

The project highlights a shift in the ever-growing $10 billion industry toward raising shrimp with minimal impact on the environment.  The film takes viewers from the seafood markets and plush restaurants of Manhattan to the sprawling ponds of Belize’s shrimp farms and even into the breeding tanks where huge Pacific white shrimp mingle and mate to start the cycle of production.

In the documentary course, created nine years ago by Pace communications professor Maria Luskay, PhD, a mix of graduate and undergraduate students produce a short film each spring, spending January and February reporting and planning the shoot – which consumes much of their March spring “break” — and then editing and producing the final product.

Students in last year’s course won “Best in Category for Documentary” in the Indie Short Film Competition for their 2010 film, “The Life of An American Ambassador: The Netherlands.” For more information visit the Pace media and communications department web site at www.pace.edu/dyson/mediacomm. In past years Luskay has taken students to Nassau, Brazil, Costa Rica, and Tuscany, to produce films.

“This is a tale of endurance and creativity,” said Luskay, director of the Pace graduate program in media and communication arts.

The new film involved partnerships with schools of journalism and communication at the University of Colorado and The George Washington University, which shot interviews with experts in Boulder and Washington, D.C.

The film can be viewed here. The making of the film is detailed on the students’ blog. Follow the students on Twitter @got_shrimp and on Facebook.

For interviews with the student filmmakers, Luskay or Revkin, contact Cara Cea in the Pace University office of public information. ccea@pace.edu, (914) 906-9680.

About Pace University

For 105 years, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

NEWS ADVISORY: Sustainable Consumption Topic of Pace Law’s 2011 Garrison Lecture Wed., April 6

To realize a sustainable future, individuals, communities and policymakers must all make mindful decisions—but they need not sacrifice quality of life according to Daniel Farber, Sho Sato Professor of Law and chair of the Energy and Resources Group at the University of California, Berkeley. (Left: Farber).

Sustainable Consumption and Communities: Bringing the American Way of Life into the Twenty-First Century

Pace Law School to host 2011 Garrison Lecture on Wednesday, April 6

WHITE PLAINS, NY, March 21, 2011—To realize a sustainable future, individuals, communities and policymakers must all make mindful decisions—but they need not sacrifice quality of life.

This will be the message that Daniel Farber, Sho Sato Professor of Law and chair of the Energy and Resources Group at the University of California, Berkeley, will deliver at the annual Lloyd K. Garrison Lecture on Environmental Law at Pace Law School on April 6.

Some of what he champions is, by now, familiar to many: People should drive fuel efficient vehicles, increase their usage of public transportation, weatherproof homes and buy energy efficient appliances. But Farber will extend his sustainability recommendations to the community level—where leaders must develop walkable communities, invest in public transportation, promote smart metering and provide information and resources necessary for citizens to make smart choices.

Farber will also explore legal strategies for implementing this vision, ranging from small incremental improvements or expansions in existing programs to more substantial and innovative approaches. These include:

  • Zoning changes to foster green communities and infill development
  • Changes in building codes to stimulate green building
  • Incentives to utilities to promote energy efficiency
  • Green labeling requirements

Farber’s talk complements Pace Law School’s strong offerings in the area of environmental law. Pace was one of the first law schools in the country to develop a comprehensive and integrated curriculum in environmental law, and is consistently ranked among the nation’s top four programs in environmental law. It offers a Master of Environmental Law (LLM), including the country’s first graduate level programs in Climate Change Law and Land Use and Sustainable Development, as well as a Doctor of Laws in Environmental Law.

Farber is available for media interviews prior to the April 6 lecture.

Farber earned his J.D. in 1975 from the University of Illinois, where he was editor-in-chief of the law review and class valedictorian. After graduating, Farber was a law clerk for Justice John Paul Stevens of the U.S. Supreme Court. Before coming to Berkeley, he taught at the University of Illinois and the University of Minnesota, where he became the first Henry J. Fletcher Professor of Law in 1987.

Farber’s books include “Environmental Law: Cases and Materials” (with A. Carlson & J. Freeman), which is now in its seventh edition; “Eco-Pragmatism: Making Sensible Environmental Decisions in an Uncertain World” (1999); “Disasters and the Law: Katrina and Beyond” (2006)(with  J. Chen); and “Environmental Law in a Nutshell,” now in its sixth edition.

WHO: Daniel Farber, Sho Sato Professor of Law and chair of the Energy and Resources Group at the University of California, Berkeley

WHAT: 2011 Lloyd K. Garrison Lecture on Environmental Law

WHERE: Pace Law School (Robert B. Fleming Moot Courtroom)
78 North Broadway
White Plains, NY

WHEN: Wednesday, April 6 at 5 p.m.

Free and open to the public.

Media admission by press pass. Check-in required.

CONTACT:

Lauren Rubenstein,
Manager, Media Relations
914-422-4389
lrubenstein@law.pace.edu

Leslie Crincoli
Senior Program Coordinator
Environmental Law Programs
914-422-4413
lcrincoli@law.pace.edu

Pace University School of Law has over 7,000 alumni throughout the country and the world, and is consistently ranked among the nation’s top four programs in environmental law. On its White Plains, NY, campus, it offers JD programs and the Master of Laws degree in Environmental Law, including the nation’s first graduate level programs in Climate Change and Land Use and Sustainable Development, and Comparative Legal Studies, and a Doctor of Laws in Environmental Law. The School of Law is part of Pace University, a comprehensive, independent, and diversified university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu

Comunidade News/O Jornal da Comunidade de Brasileiros nos Estados Unidos: “Evento na Pace University discute oportunidades no Brasil”

Dr. Claudia Green, Associate Professor of Management and Director of Hospitality and Tourism Management (pictured in green jacket at podium), has led over 250 Pace students and faculty on 10 field studies to Brazil since 2000. She spearheaded the Pace “Brazil Day 2011” event as a prelude to her 11th study abroad trip to the largest country in South America.

According to Dr. Green, as reported by Comunidade News, highlights of the Spring Break ’11 study abroad trip will include:

“Este ano, os grupos se encontram com o diretor internacional de marketing da Petrobrás, conhecem uma famosa designer de jóias e um projeto comunitário em uma favela carioca.”

Extended Translation: “This year, the group of Pace students will meet with Izeusse Braga, international director of marketing for Petrobrás {Brazilian energy giant}, as well as Carlos Sobral, a Rio-based global designer of sustainable jewelry and the Rio ‘s Director of Planning for the World Cup 2014 and the Olympics 2016. In addition, the students will participate in several community-based projects in Paraty, Ilha Grande and in the favelas of Rio de Janeiro.”

“BRAZIL DAY 2011”  was celebrated on Pace’s NYC Campus on February 4, and its stellar guest speakers caught the attention of Comunidade News, a weekly publication which covers (in Portuguese) Brazilian news from around the country.

Gotham Gazette: Cuomo Gets Settlement From ExxonMobil for Greenpoint

Law students and professors from Pace Law School’s Environmental Litigation Clinic, acting as lawyers for Riverkeeper, achieved a landmark settlement of federal litigation against ExxonMobil for oil contamination of a large section of Greenpoint, Brooklyn.

Law students and professors from Pace Law School’s Environmental Litigation Clinic have been representing Riverkeeper, which recently  joined New York State Attorney General Andrew Cuomo and residents of Brooklyn’s Greenpoint community to announce a landmark settlement of federal litigation against ExxonMobil for oil contamination of a large section of Greenpoint, Brooklyn.

From the article:

Riverkeeper has been represented since the lawsuit’s inception by dedicated law students, supervised by law professors, at Pace Law School’s Environmental Litigation Clinic in White Plains. “We are thrilled for Greenpoint, and for everyone who will ultimately use and enjoy Newtown Creek, that our litigation has concluded, and that the cleanup of the contamination will now move forward in earnest,” said Professor Daniel Estrin, one of the Supervising Attorneys at the Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic. “After decades of inaction by prior administrations to hold Exxon legally accountable, and to responsibly address one of the worst petroleum-contaminated sites in the history of this country, we now have a binding settlement in which Exxon acknowledges its legal responsibility to remediate all of the contaminated media on, and emanating from, the site. We applaud Attorney General Cuomo and the DEC for ultimately filing their own lawsuit, which helped to finally bring this unfortunate chapter for Greenpoint and Newtown Creek to conclusion.”
“Now that our lawsuit has been resolved, the next phase of restoring the community and the Creek begins” said Phillip Musegaas, Hudson River Program Director at Riverkeeper. “Riverkeeper is fully committed to supporting the community throughout this process; we will continue to monitor the cleanup to make sure that it goes according to plan and on schedule.”

Read the full article here.

Hudson Valley Business Journal: Regional Foodshed Conference Draws College Students, Educators, Officials, Farmers and Restaurateurs

Farmers and restaurateurs joined NY State officials and academic experts in new thinking about the regional “foodshed” at a conference organized by the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges & Universities on Oct. 15 and 16 at Rockland Community College.

Farmers and restaurateurs joined New York State officials and academic experts in new thinking about the regional “foodshed” at a conference organized by the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges & Universities on Oct. 15 and 16 at Rockland Community College.

The goal of the two-day seminar was for teachers and students interested in sustainable agriculture to learn how to preserve farmland, get the community interested in buying local, and to even to create their own gardens, whether on campus or at home. Another goal was to encourage college students to consider farming as a career.

From the Hudson Valley Business Journal article: “Members of academia and students from Bard, Pace, Marist, Sarah Lawrence, Rockland Community College and others converged on RCC’s Suffern campus on Oct. 15th and 16th to talk about food: where it comes from, how it gets here, and how New Yorkers can partner with state farmers to make agriculture a more integral part of their daily lives.”

“Students came from all over the Hudson Valley – from Sarah Lawrence, Marist, College of New Rochelle and others, with the event co-sponsored by Rockland Community College and Pace University.”

Read the full article.

NEWS RELEASE: The Pace Energy and Climate Center Received Award for Work on Clean Energy and Sustainability

For its work as a “tireless advocate” for clean energy, the Pace Energy and Climate Center received the Outstanding Outreach Partner Award from the Alliance for Clean Energy New York (ACE NY) at its annual meeting in Albany this afternoon.

Receives Outstanding Outreach Partner Award at ACE NY Annual Meeting

WHITE PLAINS, NY, October 28, 2010 – For its work as a “tireless advocate” for clean energy, the Pace Energy and Climate Center received the Outstanding Outreach Partner Award from the Alliance for Clean Energy New York (ACE NY) at its annual meeting in Albany this afternoon.  Presented by ACE NY’s Executive Director, Carol Murphy, this award recognizes exemplary leadership and outstanding work done on behalf of clean energy and sustainability in New York State. She praised Pace’s “dedicated efforts at the Legislature, the New York Independent System Operator (NYISO), and other state agencies and regulatory bodies, which help further positive policy developments for clean energy technologies.”

The Outstanding Outreach Partner Award is given to the individual, company or organization deemed most helpful in promoting the goals of ACE NY and sustainable energy through activities such as membership outreach, participation in public affairs and advocacy efforts, and government affairs.

“We are very pleased to receive this award, and to be recognized for our work in Albany promoting a clean energy agenda in New York State,” said Jamie Van Nostrand, executive director of the Energy and Climate Center. 

The Center’s work for alternative energy solutions in New York State includes:

  • Ensuring that the State meets its “15 by 15” energy efficiency target (achieving a 15 percent reduction in projected energy usage by 2015) through involvement in proceedings at the Public Service Commission;
  • Promoting solar energy in New York by proposing enactment of a target of 5000 MW of solar power capacity by 2025;
  • Representing environmental interests on the various stakeholder committees at the NYISO; and
  • Promoting demand response and energy efficiency as a means of avoiding investments in additional generating capacity.

 “These are critical times for laying the foundation of New York’s energy future, and we have made a significant investment in our Albany presence to advance a clean energy agenda focusing on energy efficiency, renewable energy, and other measures that reduce greenhouse gas emissions,” said Van Nostrand, adding, “It is gratifying to have these efforts recognized by ACE NY.”

The Center opened a full-time office in Albany in January 2010, and hired Jackson Morris as its senior policy advisor to work on legislative issues and to interact with key state agencies and other organizations involved in energy issues. These include the Public Service Commission, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), the Department of Environmental Conservation, and the NYISO.  According to Van Nostrand, “this award is due largely to Jackson’s tireless efforts in Albany,” with assistance from the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), which provided valuable support for the opening of the Albany office.  Van Nostrand also noted the contributions of Dr. Laurence DeWitt and Sam Swanson in providing assistance to Jackson’s efforts in Albany.

Van Nostrand indicated that Pace will continue to collaborate with ACE NY in the future in order to further our collective goals.  “As we welcome a new administration in Albany in 2011, it will be essential that we continue building on our important relationship with ACE NY and other key players in the energy and environmental community,” Van Nostrand stated.

ACE NY is a nonprofit organization coalition dedicated to promoting clean energy, energy efficiency, a healthy environment, and a strong economy for New York State.  Its mission is to promote the use of clean, renewable electricity technologies and energy efficiency in New York State, in order to increase energy diversity and security, boost economic development, improve public health, and reduce air pollution.

The Pace Energy and Climate Center is an integral part of Pace Law School’s Environmental Law Program, which is consistently ranked among the nation’s top four programs in environmental law.  For over 20 years, the Energy and Climate Center has been a leading multi-disciplinary organization in the areas of environmental research and advocacy on energy issues in New York and throughout the Northeast, while training law students in these areas.

Pace University School of Law has over 7,000 alumni throughout the country and the world, and is consistently ranked among the nation’s top four programs in environmental law. On its White Plains, NY, campus, it offers JD programs and the Master of Laws degree in Environmental Law, including the nation’s first graduate level programs in Climate Change and Land Use and Sustainable Development, and Comparative Legal Studies, and a Doctor of Laws in Environmental Law. The School of Law is part of Pace University, a comprehensive, independent, and diversified university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu.

Contact: Cathy Lewis, Director of Marketing & Communications, (914) 422-4128                                                              cdreilinger@law.pace.edu

NEWS RELEASE: Ripening Food Movement to Harvest Ideas at Conference Oct. 15 & 16

From global to gritty, current issues in food supply will be explored at the seventh annual meeting and conference of the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities all day Friday and Saturday morning, October 15 and 16 at Rockland Community College in Suffern, NY.

Small farmers, state officials, restaurateurs, academics gather to focus on “Our Foodshed”

Factory farms and food recalls are making news. Are small family farms part of the solution? Can higher education help?

WHITE PLAINS, NY, October 8, 2010 – With food recalls making regular headlines and large factory farms getting the blame, the public is increasingly turning to farmers’ markets and small, family farms for sources of local, fresh food.  A recurring question is whether the regional foodshed – the geographic areas that feed population centers – can realistically supply the region.

Michelle Land of Pace University says, “A sustainable food revolution is upon us.  Industrial agriculture’s large-scale production and dependence on long-distance transportation of product is significantly contributing to concerns of climate change, water pollution and consumption of unhealthy food.  Advancing the concept of a well-functioning foodshed requires an interdisciplinary analysis of how to combine traditional local and regional self-reliance with new thinking to address the distributional and consumptive challenges.  Through this conference, we hope to explore such issues for the Hudson River Watershed.”  Land, director of the Environmental Consortium and the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, serves as the conference planning chair.

From global to gritty, current issues in food supply will be explored at the seventh annual meeting and conference of the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges & Universities all day Friday and Saturday morning, October 15 and 16 at Rockland Community College in Suffern, NY.

The conference will bring together a colorful array of people including small-scale, family farmers, chefs and restaurant owners, agricultural policy experts, New York State officials, representatives of non-profit organizations, and academic researchers.  Conversations will focus on policy, culture, justice, as well as the roles of higher education in all facets, including integrating more local food in campus dining.

Media admission by press pass. Early responses appreciated.

The conference is open to the public. The rate for people affiliated with institutions in the Consortium is $25 for students ($35 for non members), $125 for members ($150 for non-members).  The fee includes admission to conference days, meals and breaks, Friday reception, dinner and documentary film screening, exhibitor expo, poster session, and a field trip.

Speaker Lineup and Documentary Screening Friday

Ways of evaluating an area’s capacity for local food production will be taken up in the opening keynote by Christian Peters, an Assistant Professor in the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University. He is the lead author of the 2009 published paper “Mapping potential foodsheds in New York State: A spatial model for evaluating the capacity to localize food production” (Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems).  His areas of research include local and regional food systems and the impact of dietary preferences on land use.

Other conference speakers and presenters are:

·         Polly Armour, Co-Founder and Farmer, Four Winds Farm

·         Jacquie Berger, Executive Director, Just Food, NYC

·         Stephanie Boyd, Director, Zilkha Center for Environmental Initiatives, Williams College

·         Heath Braunstein, General Manager of Pace University Dining Services, Lackmann Culinary Services

·         Cara Cea, President, Suffern Farmers’ Market Board

·         Jean-Paul Courtens, Farmer, Roxbury Farm
·         Jennifer K. Grossman, Vice President for Land Acquisition, Open Space Institute, Inc.

·         Susan Grove, Executive Director, Poughkeepsie Farm Project

·         Daniel Guenther, Farmer, Educator and Activist, Brook Farm Project

·         David Haight, Director, New York Chapter, American Farmland Trust

·         Peter Hoffman, Chef and Owner, Savoy Restaurant

·         Jill Isenbarger, Executive Director, Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture

·         Michael Mascarenhas, Assistant Professor, Science & Technology Studies, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

·         Ann McMahon, Coordinator, NYS Council on Food Policy, NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets

·         Kenneth Oldehoff, Director of Marketing and Sustainability for Campus Dining, Vassar College

·         Fabio Parasecoli, Coordinator, Department of Food Studies, The New School

·         Andrew C. Revkin, Dot Earth blogger, The New York Times, and Senior Fellow for Environmental Understanding, Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, Pace University

·         Tom Sleight, Executive Director, New York Farm Viability Institute

Friday’s events will finish with a special preview screening of the upcoming documentary on the new generation of young farmers, “The Greenhorns.”   The film is named for the non-profit (www.thegreenhorns.net) led by Severine von Tscharner Fleming, director of both the organization and the film.  The mission of The Greenhorns is to recruit, promote and support the new generation of young farmers in this ample and able 21st century America.

The guest speaker Friday, following the film, is Benjamin Shute, co-owner and farmer of Hearty Roots Community Farm.

Breakout sessions will address policy, culture, justice, the roles of restaurants, farmers, individuals,

and higher education. The conference will also include an interdisciplinary session of poster presentations and discussions on food and other environmentally related topics involving the Hudson watershed, an exhibitor expo, and a book table. It will culminate with a field trip to the Pfeiffer Center for Biodynamics and the Environment in Chestnut Ridge, NY, a demonstration and training center with 70 garden beds, an apiary, an oven, and an orchard.

Full details and registration information are at www.environmentalconsortium.org.

Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges & Universities

The Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges & Universities was established in 2004 to advance understanding of the cultural, social, political, economic, and natural factors affecting the Hudson River Watershed and currently has 55 member institutions. The Consortium’s mission is to harness higher education’s intellectual and physical resources to advance regional, ecosystem-based environmental research, teaching, and learning through interdisciplinary, collaborative programs and information sharing.

Spearheaded and hosted by Pace University, the Consortium is headquartered within the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies in White Plains, New York. Among the Academy’s goals is applying the University’s strengths to local and global environmental problems. As a testament to its commitment to interdisciplinary pedagogy, scholarship, and service, the Academy provides essential administrative support for the Consortium’s programs.

The Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies

The Academy is the first of several centers envisioned by Pace University’s President, Stephen Friedman, to promote high-level collaborative and interdisciplinary programming in key thematic, academic areas throughout the University. The Academy is a freestanding institute that renews and deepens the University’s long-standing commitment to environmental research, scholarship, and service.

The Academy for Environmental Studies builds on its predecessor, the Pace Academy for the Environment, created in 2002 and known for regional leadership spearheading the formation of the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges & Universities and serving as the incubation office for the Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries, which concentrates on applied technological innovation.

The current breadth and depth of Pace University’s environmental programming is evidenced by globally recognized undergraduate, graduate, and professional degree programs augmented by related curricular, co-curricular, experiential, and service programs centered on the environment. The Academy recently created the Pace Environmental Gateway, an online clearinghouse and integrated network of the environmental offerings across the University.

Contact:

Donna Kowal, Environmental Consortium, (914) 422-4077, info@environmentalconsortium.org

NEWS RELEASE: Pace Environmental Law Students Take on Big Coal

Student interns at the Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic, under the supervision of law professors Karl S. Coplan, Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., and Daniel Estrin, took the first step today in bringing a lawsuit against three mining companies in Kentucky for violations of the Clean Water Act.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Cathy Lewis, Director of Marketing & Communications, (914) 422-4128, cdreilinger@law.pace.edu

Karl Coplan Co-Director, Environmental Litigation Clinic (914) 422- 4332 kcoplan@law.pace.edu

PACE ENVIRONMENTAL LAW STUDENTS TAKE ON BIG COAL

Kentucky Coal Companies Cited for Falsified Monitoring Data in Violation of Federal Law

White Plains, N.Y., October 7, 2010 – Student interns at the Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic, under the supervision of law professors Karl S. Coplan, Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., and Daniel Estrin, took the first step today in bringing a lawsuit against three mining companies in Kentucky for violations of the Clean Water Act.  Representing a coalition of environmental and social justice organizations and private citizens, including Appalachian Voices, Kentuckians for the Commonwealth, Kentucky Riverkeeper, and Waterkeeper Alliance, they filed a sixty-day notice letter alleging that the companies ICG Knott County, ICG Hazard, and Frasure Creek Mining, a subsidiary of Trinity Coal, exceeded pollution discharge limits in their permits, consistently failed to conduct the required monitoring of their discharges and, in many cases, submitted false monitoring data to the state agencies charged with protecting the public. Joining in the lawsuit were several local residents impacted by the dumping of mining waste into Kentucky’s waterways.

The coal companies cited in the notice letter are all operating in eastern Kentucky under state-issued permits that allow them to discharge limited amounts of pollutants into nearby streams and rivers.  Those same permits also require industries to carefully monitor and report their pollution discharges to state officials. These monitoring reports are public documents that can be reviewed by anyone who asks for them.

Among the allegations cited in the notice letter are exceedances and misreporting of discharges of manganese, iron, total suspended solids and pH.  The groups and local residents bringing these claims cite a total of over 20,000 incidences of these three companies, either exceeding permit pollution limits, failing to submit reports, or falsifying the required monitoring data.  These violations could result in fines that may exceed 740 million dollars.  Speaking at a press conference call this morning, Professor Coplan said, “No one should make money by violating the Clean Water Act.”

Under the Clean Water Act, the companies have sixty days to respond to the allegations made in the notice letter. If, at the end of that period, all violations have not been corrected, the groups and individuals plan on filing a complaint in federal court for the Eastern District of Kentucky.

The claims brought today may just be the tip of the iceberg when it comes to irresponsible mining reporting practices and a failure in the state’s monitoring program.  A recent trip to Kentucky’s Division of Mine Reclamation and Enforcement regional offices by Appalachian Voices’ Waterkeeper found stack after stack of discharge monitoring reports (DMRs) from more than 60 coal mines and processing facilities covered in dust on the desks of mine inspectors’ secretaries.  They did not appear to have been evaluated for compliance by the regulators for more than three years.  A sampling of the reports showed hundreds of repeated violations by coal mine operators in the state.  Commenting during the press briefing, Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. added, “Regular, systematic open fraud that anyone could have uncovered shows the contempt that the coal industry has, not just for the law but for the state agency supposed to enforce it.”

“Our state officials have closed their eyes to an obviously serious problem,” said Ted Withrow, the retired Big Sandy Basin Management Coordinator for the Kentucky Division of Water and a member of Kentuckians For The Commonwealth. “These are not small exceedances – some are over 40 times the daily maximum. This should have been a red flag.”

The allegations of falsification of monitoring reports are another blow in a long list of recent black eyes for the coal industry, which is under widespread pressure to clean up its destructive practices and take responsibility for its enormous and devastating ecological footprint.  “The coal industry has proven time and again that it can’t be trusted.  It continually downplays its severe environmental impacts, places profit over worker safety and offers false economic analysis to try to keep its inherently destructive practices alive,” said Scott Edwards, Director of Advocacy for Waterkeeper Alliance.  “And now, we know they’re not honest in reporting on matters that impact the health of communities where they operate.”

“The Clean Water Act’s ‘citizen suit’ provision empowers citizens to be ‘private attorneys general,’ and to bring polluters into court when government doesn’t do its job,” said Professor Estrin.  The organizations bringing this legal action are taking it upon themselves to enforce the law and put an end to the illegal practices.

The Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic, which represents public interest environmental advocacy groups, has been working on this matter since April.  When he first reviewed the coal companies’ monitoring reports, Professor Coplan knew it would be a good project for the students.  Clinic Legal Interns drafted the notice letters and worked with the clients to assemble the appendices to the letters identifying the specific permit violations.

Peter Harrison, one of the Clinic law students who has been working on the case since June, came to Pace from Appalachia, where he was involved in grassroots environmental initiatives.  “It’s gratifying to come to law school in New York and get to work on a lawsuit that we hope will make a difference in the lives of people in the South,” said Harrison.  “Working at the Clinic has given me an opportunity to practice law before I even pass the bar, and has really crystallized the whole reason I came to law school.”

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Pace University School of Law has over 7,000 alumni throughout the country and the world, and is consistently ranked among the nation’s top four programs in environmental law. On its White Plains, NY, campus, it offers JD programs and the Master of Laws degree in Environmental Law, including the nation’s first graduate level programs in Climate Change and Land Use and Sustainable Development, and Comparative Legal Studies, and a Doctor of Laws in Environmental Law. The School of Law is part of Pace University, a comprehensive, independent, and diversified university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu

Pace-Led Team Finds That New York Sustainable Biofuel Could Help Decrease Greenhouse Gas Pollution

A report issued by a team led by Pace Law School’s Energy and Climate Center provides insights into possible future liquid transportation solutions. Use of biofuel made from wood, grass and other forms of biomass could reduce New York State’s gasoline consumption by as much as 16% of projected use in 2020 and play a significant role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, according to the report.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Cara Cea, (914) 773-3312, ccea@pace.edu

Pace-Led Team Finds That New York Sources of Sustainable Biofuel Could Help Decrease Greenhouse Gas Pollution, Create Jobs, and Increase Energy Security

WHITE PLAINS, NY (June 7, 2010) – A report issued by a team led by Pace Law School’s Energy and Climate Center provides insights into possible future liquid transportation solutions. Use of biofuel made from wood, grass and other forms of biomass could reduce New York State’s gasoline consumption by as much as 16% of projected use in 2020 and play a significant role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, according to the report.

Produced at the recommendation of Governor David Paterson’s Renewable Energy Task Force, the “Renewable Fuels Roadmap and Sustainable Biomass Feedstock Supply for New York State” (Roadmap) was developed to help guide state policy on renewable fuels.  The project was undertaken with funding from the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), and the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.

To conduct the study, the Pace Energy and Climate Center assembled a team of the leading authorities on biofuels throughout the Northeast, including researchers from Cornell University and the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, and from consulting firms on energy and environmental issues such as Energetics, Energy and Environmental Research Associates, and Antares Group.  The coalition known as Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management as well as Cornell Cooperative Extension branches throughout New York State were also members of the Pace-led team.

The Roadmap evaluates the future of liquid biofuel production and feedstock supplies (materials used to produce the biofuels) for transportation purposes in New York State in order to achieve reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions as well as achieve greater independence from petroleum usage.  In Executive Order No. 24 issued in August 2009, New York adopted a goal of achieving an 80% reduction in GHG emissions from 1990 levels by 2050, or an 80 by 50 target.  The Roadmap presents a snapshot of New York’s current biomass production, including agricultural products and forest products, as well as existing biomass feedstock inventory.  The Roadmap also considers land use issues, transportation and distribution infrastructure, competing uses for biomass, and technologies that are necessary to convert feedstocks to biofuels, for example, grasses or woody material to produce ethanol or soy to produce biodiesel.  In its analysis, the Roadmap examines the potential effects of increased use of renewable fuels, such as ethanol and biodiesel on economic development, the environment, and public health.

“The Roadmap sheds light on important aspects of how New York’s transportation infrastructure will develop,” stated Jamie Van Nostrand, Executive Director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center.  “In order to achieve an 80 by 50 target, we need to transition the transportation sector away from carbon-emitting fuels, either through electrification or use of renewable fuels.  Given the time it will take to transition to electric cars and to build the electrical grid infrastructure necessary to power this new fleet, ethanol-gasoline mixtures will still be a necessary component of this transition.”

“There is no silver bullet for ensuring New York’s clean energy future,“ according to Zywia Wojnar, Research Director at the Pace Energy and Climate Center, and Roadmap Project Manager.  “Biofuels could be an integral part of the fuel mix that is necessary to limit greenhouse gas emissions, while reducing dependency on fossil fuels.  The Roadmap provides important insights into just how a New York biofuels industry could help meet those goals.”

Some of the key findings include:

  • Based only on in-state feedstocks (e.g., perennial grasses, woody biomass, and soy from which biofuels are produced), New York could provide 5.6 – 16% of estimated 2020 gasoline consumption by the residents of New York State.
  • Biomass-based liquid fuels, or biofuels, potentially can play a large role in reducing the state’s emissions of greenhouse gases, which are a leading contributor to global warming.  A new industry that makes cellulosic biofuels from feedstocks grown in a sustainable manner has the potential to decrease GHG emissions by between 67% and 85% compared to the equivalent energy content of petroleum fuel.
  • Potentially negative environmental effects from the production of biofuels in New York State include deteriorated air quality, soil erosion, impaired water quality, acidification of water and soil, and reduced biodiversity.  Implementing appropriate best management practices in growing and harvesting the feedstocks would minimize some of these adverse effects.
  • Compared to fossil fuels, in a total life cycle analysis of cellulosic biofuels from sustainable feedstocks, levels of certain air pollutant emissions may be reduced, such as sulfur oxides and benzene. Levels of other pollutants may increase, such as nitrogen oxides, aldehydes, and particulate matter.  Increased emissions of some air pollutants may lead to increased public health concerns such as cardio-vascular diseases.
  • Four centralized large-scale or 24 smaller-scale biofuels product facilities could operate with sustainably available biomass in the State.
  • An assessment of the current technologies to convert biomass to advanced biofuels suggests that the industry is five to ten years away from commercial production.
  • Depending upon the rate at which the biofuels industry grows, between 4,000 and 14,000 jobs could be created state-wide.
  • Establishing a sustainable biofuels industry based upon the information provided in the Roadmap will require the adoption of new policies by New York State lawmakers.

Annual updates to the Roadmap report will be prepared in 2011 and 2012 in order to address technological improvements and policy developments.

A copy of the Roadmap can be found at www.law.pace.edu/energy/programs.

The Energy and Climate Center is an integral part of Pace Law School’s environmental law program, which regularly is ranked by U.S. News & World Report as one of the nation’s top environmental law programs.  For more than 20 years, the Energy and Climate Center has been a leading multi-disciplinary organization in the areas of environmental research and policy on energy issues in New York and throughout the Northeast, while training law students in these areas.www.law.pace.edu/energy

Founded in 1976, Pace University School of Law has nearly 6,700 alumni throughout the country and the world. It offers full- and part-time day and evening JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus. The School also offers the Master of Laws in Environmental Law, Climate Change Law, and in Comparative Legal Studies as well as an SJD in environmental law. The School of Law is part of a comprehensive, independent, and diversified University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu.