NewsFactor: “Wall Street Traders Mine Tweets for Investing Clues”

A Study done by a Pace PhD candidate Arthur O’Connor which showed a correlation between stocks and social-media was mentioned in the NewsFactor article “Wall Street Traders Mine Tweets for Investing Clues”.

A Study done by a Pace PhD candidate Arthur O’Connor which showed a correlation between stocks and social-media was mentioned in the NewsFactor article “Wall Street Traders Mine Tweets for Investing Clues”. NewsFactor.com reports that the “Online surveillance of social-networking sites is emerging as a must-have tool for hedge funds, big banks, high-frequency traders and black-box investment firms that run money via computer programs.”

Excerpt from the article:

Interest in the marriage of social media and finance remains high. In March, a study done by a Ph.D. candidate at Pace University showed a positive correlation between stock price performance and the social-media “popularity” of well-known brands Starbucks, Coca-Cola and Nike. The Pace author, Arthur O’Connor, also found that brand popularity online may be a “lead indicator” of stock performance. And a team of economists at TUM School of Management, or Technical University of Munich, has created a Web site, TweetTrader.net, that attempts to profit from similar Twitter research.

Read the full article on NewsFactor.com.

EverydayHealth.com – “Cyberbullying and Kids’ Safety”

The Numbers Behind Cyberbullying

Cyberbullying is more than just a passing fad. “Studies suggest that between 17 and 60 percent of teens are the victim of some form of cyberbullying,” says Richard Shadick, PhD, a psychologist and director of the Counseling Center at Pace University in New York. “Rates differ based upon the age of the teens studied and how frequently they use the Internet. Older teens who use the Internet more frequently have higher rates. However, there is agreement that cyberbullying has increased in recent years.”

Though bullying in school is not new, the methods now include harassment online, and in all forms of digital communication –http://www.everydayhealth.com/back-to-school/cyberbullying-and-kids-safety.aspx

“Although the risks of cyberbullying are similar to non-electronic forms of bullying,  there are some important differences, ” notes Pace’s Dr. Richard Shadick. 

“There are the traditional risks such as psychological symptoms that may impair a teen’s ability to function at school or work or interact with classmates, friends, and family, ” said Dr. Shadick.  “Unique risks are victims may not know the bully (due to the anonymity of the internet), that there is not a direct physical effect (no immediate physical harm is present), and the bullying may spread quickly to a large number of third parties (for example, an email sent out to many recipients or something posted on a blog that is read by many people).”