The Hill’s Congress Blog: “Google antitrust settlement surprises everyone”

“The recent settlement by the Federal Trade Commission with Google leaves privacy advocates shocked and dismayed but smartphone manufacturers will be jubilant,” writes Darren Hayes of Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

“The recent settlement by the Federal Trade Commission with Google leaves privacy advocates shocked and dismayed but smartphone manufacturers will be jubilant,” writes Darren Hayes of  Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.
Read his op-ed on The Hill’s Congress Blog.

Computerworld: “Reports: Apple slashes iPhone component orders”

. . . “Given the recent numbers of the Galaxy S III, Samsung is a serious competitor, so I’m not surprised that some of the initial hype over the iPhone 5 has dissipated,” said Darren Hayes, an assistant professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. “The Galaxy is a trendy phone for young people, and I see lots of students buying these.”

. . . “Given the recent numbers of the Galaxy S III, Samsung is a serious competitor, so I’m not surprised that some of the initial hype over the iPhone 5 has dissipated,” said Darren Hayes, an assistant professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. “The Galaxy is a trendy phone for young people, and I see lots of students buying these.”

Today, Samsung announced that it had sold 40 million Galaxy S III smartphones since the device’s May 2012 launch, and more than 100 million Galaxy S-series handsets since 2010.

Hayes also ticked off some of the familiar knocks against Apple’s business model, ranging from its intransigence over high carrier subsidies and the Maps debacle to its habit of upgrading the iPhone annually, saying that those decisions have come home to roost.

“This may be a long-term issue for Apple,” argued Hayes. “Apple hasn’t changed the iPhone as dramatically as we’re used to seeing, but instead [has] made only small changes to its functionality.”

As an example, Hayes cited Near Field Communications (NFC), a technology that Apple has yet to apply to the iPhone, while Samsung has made much of it in advertising campaigns, showing users transferring data simply by touching their phones together.

Read the article by Computerworld.

Westchester County Business Journal: “Global innovation drives new Pace dean”

Amar Gupta brings to his new post at Pace University a vision of around-the-clock, globally dispersed workplaces and a zealous goal of collaborative innovation in technology that unites academia, industry and government and crosses traditional campus boundaries between learning disciplines.

Amar Gupta brings to his new post at Pace University a vision of around-the-clock, globally dispersed workplaces and a zealous goal of collaborative innovation in technology that unites academia, industry and government and crosses traditional campus boundaries between learning disciplines.

Read the article in Westchester County Business Journal.

Investor’s Business Daily: “Google Can ‘Push Envelope’ On Search After FTC Ruling”

. . . “I think Google’s going to continue to push the envelope” with its U.S. search as a result of the decision, said Darren Hayes, who chairs the computer information systems program at Pace University in New York.

. . . “I think Google’s going to continue to push the envelope” with its U.S. search as a result of the decision, said Darren Hayes, who chairs the computer information systems program at Pace University in New York.

Antitrust regulators in Europe separately investigating Google for many of the same issues could implement restrictions that would make the U.S. an even more important market for Google, says Hayes.

“Things are tightening in Europe,” he said. “… then the U.S. market, in terms of gathering personal information, is more important than ever.”

Hayes says that means that in the U.S., “search bias” will likely increase.

Read the article in Investor’s Business Daily.

Computerworld: “Google antitrust settlement reshapes patent disputes”

. . . The patent portion of the FTC settlement will be important for Google’s competitors in the mobile industry, said Darren Hayes, chairman of the computer information systems department at Pace University.

. . . The patent portion of the FTC settlement will be important for Google’s competitors in the mobile industry, said Darren Hayes, chairman of the computer information systems department at Pace University in New York City.

Hayes questioned why the FTC wasn’t tougher in other sections of the settlement, but suggested that the patent provisions take away some of Google’s negotiating power in patent infringement disputes.

“This is a big deal, because I think that the FTC recognized that Motorola Mobility held so many important patents, in terms of the advancement of smartphone technology,” Hayes said. “If they didn’t force Google to relinquish the control of those patents, it was going to affect the advancement of smartphone technology very seriously.”

Read the article on Computerworld.

The Hill’s Congress Blog: “Let’s talk to each other about STEM”

“The STEM Center Collaboratory at Pace University in New York has been conceived as a place where inner city K-12 educators, Pace University professors, industry executives and practitioners, with state, local and national officials can establish a sustainable dialogue that conceptualizes and applies new techniques and theories that will improve the STEM education experience for students, teachers and parents,” write Lauren Birney and Jonathan Hill of Pace.

“The STEM Center Collaboratory at Pace University in New York has been conceived as a place where inner city K-12 educators, Pace University professors, industry executives and practitioners, with state, local and national officials can establish a sustainable dialogue that conceptualizes and applies new techniques and theories that will improve the STEM education experience for students, teachers and parents,” write Lauren Birney and Jonathan Hill of Pace. “Improving students’ skills and comfort with mathematics, the foundation of all STEM disciplines, is a key part of this endeavor. Making science topical, approachable, applicable, innovative and exciting and even cool is the other key aspect of this project.”

Read their op-ed on The Hill’s Congress Blog.