Pace to Host Eastern Colleges Science Conference April 24; 34 Pace Students Presenting

Meet the next Thomas Edison, Madam Curie, Sigmund Freud or Isaac Newton. On April 24th, Pace University will host the 64th annual Eastern Colleges Science Conference (ECSC) in Pleasantville, NY where students from across the northeast will be presenting work that shows that science programs are thriving and growing and science students are excelling.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY TO HOST EASTERN COLLEGES SCIENCE CONFERENCE, APRIL 24

Local college students talk biology, chemistry, mathematics, engineering and psychology

Other local colleges represented include Fordham, Manhattan, Marist and Kingsborough Community College

Details on participating Pace students and their presentations available upon request

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, April 20, 2010 —Meet the next Thomas Edison, Madam Curie, Sigmund Freud or Isaac Newton. On April 24th, Pace University will host the 64th annual Eastern Colleges Science Conference (ECSC) in Pleasantville, NY where students from across the northeast will be presenting work that shows that science programs are thriving and growing and science students are excelling.

The Conference, which currently has over 400 registrants and is the largest in recent years, involves over 200 presentations of the latest studies in the natural sciences, mathematics, engineering and psychology. Pace University students will be presenting a total of 34 papers covering topics in these disciplines. A highlight of the Conference is the Awards Dinner at which top students will be honored in each of the disciplines.

The Plenary speaker at the dinner will be William Schlesinger, PhD, of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, NY. His talk is entitled, “Homo sapiens in the Environment: More than a Beast, Less than an Angel.” Associate Professor of English Deborah Poe will also be reading poetry from her new book Elements.

WHAT: Eastern Colleges Science Conference

WHO: Students and faculty from 18 colleges and universities throughout the northeast

WHEN: Saturday, April 24, 7:30am – 8:30pm

Media admission by press pass.

Additional details on the event can be found here: http://www.pace.edu/pace/dyson/academic-departments-and-programs/biology-and-health-sciences/events-and-announcements/ecsc2010/

For more information about the 64th ECSC, contact Professor Richard Schlesinger at 914-773-3200 or rschlesinger@pace.edu.

The public is welcome to view the poster display and observe the oral presentations for an on-site registration fee of $45.

“Science is very often at the forefront of today’s headlines, with issues such as swine flu, bioterrorism, climate change, cloning and stem cell research.” said Richard Schlesinger, PhD, Associate Dean, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, and Professor, Department of Biology and Health Sciences at Pace. “And the news is not always positive regarding training of future generations of aware citizens since reports indicate that the US educational system is not necessarily providing our students with the science literacy they need.

“The good news is that science is one of our fastest growing majors at Pace and a conference like this shows overall a bright future for rising stars in this broad field,” added Schlesinger.

The day will also include tours of the newly renovated Dyson Hall science labs and of Pace’s Environmental Center which is housed in an historical farmhouse. Among the renovations in Dyson Hall are a new research lab for the Department of Biology and Health Sciences and a new teaching lab for the Genetics and Molecular Biology courses. This is the third largest construction project to date on Pace’s Pleasantville campus and is supported in part by a $5 million grant from the Dyson Foundation and a New York State Higher Education Capital Grant for $1.8 million. The second phase of construction begins this summer and will include renovating the Chemistry and Physical Science laboratories. Another new feature will be an environmental science “suite” that incorporates teaching and research facilities for both undergraduate and graduate courses in environmental and earth science. The new design will help facilitate the growing integration of research into the undergraduate curriculum for students in Pace’s rapidly expanding science programs that will produce professionals in fields including biomedical research, forensic science and environmental science.

About ECSC: Established in 1947, the Eastern Colleges Science Conference is an association consisting of primarily undergraduate colleges and universities in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Rhode Island and Ohio. The main function of the ECSC is to stimulate interest in undergraduate research in the natural sciences and related fields.

The ECSC is an annual conference in late April or May that provides a forum for undergraduate students to present their research in topics including computer science and behavioral and social sciences as well as biology, chemistry, mathematics, physics and engineering. Students may give platform (oral) presentations, poster presentations, and/or full-length papers.

Over the past 62 years, there have been 44 hosts of the ECSC, believed to be the oldest annual conference of its kind in the United States. Conferences have been held at small liberal arts colleges, at state universities, and at the United States armed services academies in Annapolis and West Point. This is the first time Pace has hosted the ECSC.

About Pace University: For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Pace to Invest $7.2 Million in Science Labs; $1.8 Million to be Received Through NYS Grant

Pace University, the largest university in Westchester County and one known for rapidly-growing science programs, is about to invest more than $7 million dollars in the renovation of the science laboratories on its Pleasantville campus.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Cara Halstead Cea, Public Information Officer, Pace University, 914-773-3312, chalstead@pace.edu

Steve Densmore, Dyson Foundation Press Liaison
845-234-8713, sdensmore@dyson.org

Emma Furman, Deputy Chief of Staff,
Office of Assemblyman Richard Brodsky, District Office: 914-345-0432

Allyson Felix, Communications Director,
NY State Senator Andrea Stewart-Cousins, 914-771-4190

PACE UNIVERSITY TO INVEST $7.2 MILLION
IN RENOVATION OF SCIENCE LABS

$1.8 Million to come from first grants of the New York State Higher Education Capital Matching program

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, May 5, 2008 – Pace University, the largest university in Westchester County and one known for rapidly-growing science programs, is about to invest more than $7 million dollars in the renovation of the science laboratories on its Pleasantville campus.

The university was awarded approximately $1.8 million in capital improvement funding from New York State last week. The grant is part of the first round of funding through the New York State Higher Education Capital Matching Grants program (HE Cap). The HE Cap board approved $52 million for 40 projects at 33 institutions in New York State.

The Pace funds will be matched by $5.4 million from a Dyson Foundation grant, announced earlier, for the renovation of Dyson Hall, which houses the biology and health sciences laboratories and classrooms on Pace’s Pleasantville campus. Dyson Hall was built in 1963 with funding provided by the financier Charles H. Dyson.

The renovation of this building will mark the largest capital investment on the campus since 2002, when the Ann and Alfred Goldstein Health, Fitness and Recreation Center was completed.

Trained professionals. “This funding will allow Pace to improve facilities for our rapidly growing science programs that produce professionals in fields including cancer research, forensics and environmental science,” said Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman. “We are very grateful for the hard work of our state legislators, without whom this would not have been possible.”

In the last six years, science majors at Pace have increased almost 40 percent, with a 50 percent increase in biology majors. Pace’s core curriculum requires all students to take one science class with a laboratory component.

“Through the New York State Higher Education Capital Match Program, we’ve been able to secure $150 million for private colleges based on enrollment and student financial need,” said Assemblyman Richard L. Brodsky (D-District 92). “I’m very pleased that three of the largest grants in the program will be benefiting institutions in Westchester, with Pace receiving the second largest of those grants. This funding will help to ensure that Pace University continues to be on the forefront of scientific research and innovation.”

State Senator Andrea Stewart-Cousins (35th District -Westchester) added: “As an alumna of the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences at Pace, I am particularly gratified to help contribute to the improvement of an already exceptional program. With science at the heart of some of the most popular careers such as forensics, I am glad to see the largest university in Westchester receive funding that will serve the needs of many of the scientists and researchers of the future.”

The HE Cap program requires a three to one (non-State to State) match by institutions. Grants may be used for the design, construction, acquisition or renovation of facilities. The list of approved projects is available at http://www.dasny.org/dasny/hecap/index.php.

Pace is receiving the seventh largest gift in the program. Institutions that have not yet applied for HE Cap allocation have until March 31, 2009 to apply.

Buyout pioneer. The Dyson contribution was announced last year by Charles Dyson’s son, Robert R. Dyson, Chairman and CEO of Dyson-Kissner-Moran and President of the Dyson Foundation, as part of the foundation’s 50th anniversary. The total Dyson gift of $7.5 million in 2007 was the third largest in Pace’s history and reflects a partnership between the Dyson family and Pace that began 78 years ago when Charles H. Dyson graduated from Pace in 1930.

Dyson became a pioneer in leveraged buyouts, was founder of the privately held investment firm Dyson-Kissner-Moran, undertook government assignments during the administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt, and served as Chairman of Pace’s Board of Trustees.

Charles Dyson died in 1997, but his name and legacy live on at his alma mater in a wide variety of capital, endowment and program priorities, especially in the name of the University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, named for him in 1974. It has grown rapidly in the last five years. Gifts to Pace from Charles Dyson, The Dyson Foundation and Dyson-Kissner-Moran Corporation now total more than $23 million.

About The Dyson Foundation. The Dyson Foundation is a private, family-directed grantmaking foundation established in 1957. The Foundation is led by Robert R. Dyson who has served as the Foundation’s President since 2000. Headquartered in Millbrook (Dutchess County), New York, the Foundation awards grants through a diverse regional funding program in the Dyson family’s home community of the Mid-Hudson Valley of New York State. The Dyson Foundation also makes grants outside the Hudson Valley to pre-selected organizations. http://www.dysonfoundation.org/

Professional education. Since 1906 Pace University has offered professional education that combines liberal arts with practical experience and the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York. It enrolls more than 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

Over 200 Area High School Students to Compete in Science Fair at Pace

Over 200 students from 26 area high schools in Westchester and Putnam Counties will gather on Saturday morning at the Pace University Briarcliff campus for the much anticipated 8th annual Progenics – Regeneron – Siemens – Acorda Westchester Science and Engineering Fair.

Posted on behalf of WESEF:

OVER 200 AREA HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS TO COMPETE IN
INTEL AFFILIATED LOCAL SCIENCE FAIR AT PACE UNIVERSITY

THE 8TH ANNUAL PROGENICS – REGENERON – SIEMENS-ACORDA: WESTCHESTER SCIENCE & ENGINEERING FAIR AT PACE UNIVERSITY
SATURDAY, MARCH 15th, 2008
9:00AM to 4:30PM
Pace University Dining Hall
Briarcliff Campus
235 Elm Road, Briarcliff Manor, NY 10510

Over 200 students from 26 area high schools in Westchester and Putnam Counties will gather on Saturday morning at the Pace University Briarcliff campus for the much anticipated 8th annual Progenics – Regeneron – Siemens – Acorda Westchester Science and Engineering Fair. Students will be showcasing their accomplishments in a competitive venue featuring individual and team poster presentations to be judged by local experts in the fields of math, science and engineering.

The Progenics – Regeneron – Siemens – Acorda Westchester Science and Engineering Fair, known as “WESEF”, is made possible by the generous contributions of local corporate sponsors including
Progenics Pharmaceuticals, Inc; Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Siemens Medical Solutions, Acorda Therapeutics and Pace University. Additional sponsors include Fujifilm USA, Carl Zeiss Microimaging, Inc., Entergy, Psychogenics, and Ciba. In total, these sponsors have donated close to $100,000 for this year’s event.

Nearly 75% of all students who enter the fair will be recognized with awards made possible through the generous donations of the sponsors. The grand prize will be awarded to eight individual and four team projects. These finalists, whose outstanding work earns top scores in the fair, will win a week-long, all expenses paid trip to Atlanta, Georgia to compete in the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, the “superbowl” of science fairs. At the international fair, more than 1,500 students from over 50 countries will compete for $4 million in prizes and scholarships to be awarded this year.

Student projects focus on a wide range of topics in all areas of science, math, engineering and psychology. The diversity of students’ interests is evident by the titles of their projects – from Breast Cancer tumor vesicle proteomics research to preventing diabetic blindness and monitoring declining Box Turtle populations in Westchester County. The majority of students in the fair are seniors who have honed their research skills over the course of their high school career. However, occasionally younger students are able to complete research projects; this year, one 9th grade team from Somers High School will be presenting their research aiming to improve reading comprehension in young children using audio books.

The public is invited to view the presentations from 3:30-4:30. The Press is invited to capture the excitement during the day’s events. For more information please contact:

Michael Blueglass
WESEF President
4 Benjamin Green Lane
Mahopac, NY 10541
(H) 914-248-7679
(W) 914-243-0561
(C)914-447-3568
(Fax) 914-248-9658

Plans for Queens School to be Built on Toxic Site to be Discussed Today at Pace

Pace University biology student Alessia Eramo, with her professor and mentor, James M. Cervino, Ph.D. and the chair of the Pace biology department, Richard Schlesinger, Ph.D., will be holding a town hall style meeting with the city’s School Construction Authority (SCA) and local government officials to discuss a proposed school in Queens to be built on a toxic site or “brownfield” and to present the results of studies they conducted at the site at the request of New York State Senator Frank Padavan. According to the Environmental Protection Agency’s website, brownfields are real estate “the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence … of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant.”

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact:
Cara Halstead, Public Information Officer, Pace University
914-773-3312 Office, 914-906-9680 Cell, chalstead@pace.edu

PLANS TO BUILD A SCHOOL ON A TOXIC SITE IN QUEENS
TO BE DISCUSSED AT PACE UNIVERSITY

Analysis of the New York State Department of Conservation Clean-up proposal to be presented to city’s School Construction Authority by Pace researchers

NEW YORK, NY, April 11, 2007 – Pace University biology student Alessia Eramo, with her professor and mentor, James M. Cervino, Ph.D. and the chair of the Pace biology department, Richard Schlesinger, Ph.D., will be holding a town hall style meeting with the city’s School Construction Authority (SCA) and local government officials to discuss a proposed school in Queens to be built on a toxic site or “brownfield” and to present the results of studies they conducted at the site at the request of New York State Senator Frank Padavan. According to the Environmental Protection Agency’s website, brownfields are real estate “the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence … of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant.”

To be called the Gateway School, the new structure is planned for a site on Goethals Ave. between 160th and 161st Streets in Jamaica, Queens.

WHAT: Presentation of toxicology research to the School Construction Authority and the public

WHEN: Thursday, April 12, 12:00pm

WHERE: Pace University, downtown New York City campus (near City Hall), 41 Park Row, Dyson Conference Room, 16th floor

WHO: Pace University researchers presenting to the city’s School Construction Authority, Queens government officials, and other concerned parties. This meeting is free and open to the public. Media admission is by press pass.

Cervino, a marine pathologist who is also a post doc researcher with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Cape Cod, MA, was asked by Senator Frank Padavan (R) NY to analyze the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) clean-up proposal of the site. Pace biology department chair, Richard Schlesinger, Ph.D., will also be on hand to answer questions regarding human health concerns pertaining to the site and the proposed sub slab depressurization system, designed to eliminate soil gas, to be installed after the toxins are removed.

BACKGROUND: Soil samples were collected in 2001 and 2002 and then again in 2005 and 2006 at the request of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC). After a remedial action plan was developed by the SCA and input received from the NYSDEC, the plan was approved by the DEC. Recent soil vapor samples analyzed by the Pace researchers revealed hazardous chemical substances remain including fuel, medical waste and cleaning chemicals. Although there are provisions in the SCA plan for removing these hazardous substances, the Pace researchers have found additional issues that should be resolved to minimize the health risks associated with them.

Neil De Grasse Tyson, Author and Host of NOVA, Science Now to Speak at Pace this Month

On Thursday evening, March 29, 2007, Bronx-born astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, host of NOVA, ScienceNow and Director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History and the only scientist to eyewitness and record the collapse of the Twin Towers,, will give a public reading from his current best seller, “Death by Black Hole, and Other Cosmic Quandaries” at Pace University’s downtown Manhattan campus, One Pace Plaza, across from City Hall, at 6 PM.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact:

Cara Halstead Cea, Pace University, 914-773-3312 (Office), 914-906-9680 (Cell) chalstead@pace.edu

AN EVENING WITH NEIL deGRASSE TYSON

On Thursday evening, March 29, 2007, Bronx-born astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, host of NOVA, ScienceNow and Director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History and the only scientist to eyewitness and record the collapse of the Twin Towers,, will give a public reading from his current best seller, “Death by Black Hole, and Other Cosmic Quandaries” at Pace University’s downtown Manhattan campus, One Pace Plaza, across from City Hall, at 6 PM.

WHO: Neil deGrasse Tyson, host of Nova, Science Now and Director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History

WHAT: Reading, Q. and A., and book signing of Tyson’s “Death by Black Hole, and Other Cosmic Quandaries.” Free and open to the public. Light supper will be served. “Death by Black Hole” and other titles by the author will be available for signing.

WHEN: Thursday 29 March, 2007, 6:00 – 8:00pm

WHERE: Pace University, Multipurpose Room, One Pace Plaza, level B

“Death by Black Hole,” a collection of 42 essays first published in Natural History magazine, includes “In the Beginning,” winner of the prestigious Science Writing Award, 2005, from the American Institute of Physics.

Voted “the sexiest astrophysicist alive” by People Magazine in 2002, Tyson is the on-camera host of PBS-NOVA’s spinofff program NOVA ScienceNow, writes a monthly essay for Natural History magazine, is the author of seven books, was appointed to NASA’s Advisory Committee last year and is a former member of two Bush commissions, including the federal “Moon, Mars and Beyond,” to show how a new space vision can become part of the national agenda. Tyson is the recipient of seven honorary doctorates and the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal.

His contributions to the public appreciation of the cosmos have been recognized by the International Astronomical Union in their official naming of asteroid “13123 Tyson”. Tyson graduated from the Bronx High School of Science, earned his BA in physics from Harvard and his PhD in astrophysics from Columbia. He has been the invited guest of heads of state, national and international, and his delivery skills combine humor, poetry, literary references and the combative maneuvers of a wrestler as he presents indispensable truths which affect our daily lives.

Media admission is by press card. More information is at www.pace.edu.

Impact of Radioactive Leaks at Indian Point to be Examined at Roundtable and Town Meeting Tomorrow

Elected leaders, public officials and nationally-renowned scientists will gather on Friday, March 2 at Pace University’s Pleasantville campus to examine the implications of ongoing radioactive leaks at the Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant.

The following press release is from the Pace Academy for the Environment in conjunction with the Hudson River Sloop Clearwater and the Indian Point Safe Energy Coalition
(IPSEC):

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts: Stephen Kent: 845-758-0097, cell 914-589-5988, skent@kentcom.com
Steve Densmore: 845-234-8713, stevied423@hotmail.com
Scott Cullen: 631-428-0034, scullen@gracelinks.org
Manna Jo Greene: 845-454-7673 x 113; cell 845-807-1270, mannajo@clearwater.org
Cara Halstead Cea: 914-773-3312, cell: 914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu

Impact of Radioactive Leaks at Indian Point to be Examined

Roundtable, Town Meeting Set for Friday, March 2 at Pace University

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, March 1, 2007 — Elected leaders, public officials and nationally-renowned scientists will gather on Friday, March 2 at Pace University’s Pleasantville campus to examine the implications of ongoing radioactive leaks at the Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant.

Sponsored by Hudson River Sloop Clearwater Inc, Pace Academy for the Environment and the Indian Point Safe Energy Coalition (IPSEC), the technical briefing and a later town meeting are free and open to the public, which is encouraged to attend to learn more about the radioactive leaks and their potential impacts upon groundwater, the Hudson River, and public health.

Federal, state and local officials from all levels of government are expected to participate, including members of New York’s Congressional delegation, representatives from 11 lower Hudson Valley counties, relevant state agencies, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and local municipal leaders. This month members of the New York Congressional Delegation reintroduced legislation in the U.S. House of Representatives that, if passed, would require an Independent Safety Assessment (ISA) at the Indian Point nuclear power plant, including in-depth review of Indian Point’s safety and mechanical systems, spent fuel pools, and radiological emergency evacuation plans. Senator Hillary Clinton (D-New York) recently proposed similar legislation in the U.S. Senate.

U.S. Representative John Hall (D-Dover), a co-sponsor of the House bill calling for an independent safety assessment at Indian Point, is expected to participate in the March 2 roundtable discussion. “Indian Point is the nation’s most problematic power plant in the nation’s most densely populated corridor,” said Hall, in a Feb. 16 article appearing in the Westport News. “With 8 percent of the population of the United States within a 50-mile radius of the plant, our bill forces the NRC to give this plant the special attention it requires. This bill will force Entergy to do what it takes to run Indian Point safely or they won’t be able to run it at all.”

Experts in hydrology, geology, public health, ecology and regulatory issues will explain the most current information available concerning Strontium 90 and other radioactive isotopes discovered leaking from the aging nuclear power plant located in Buchanan, New York and operated by the Entergy Corporation. What was initially described as a “slightly radioactive leak” amounting to “less than a pint a day,” when it was first discovered in September, 2005, has since grown to an “underground area [of] contaminated water that is 50 to 60 feet deep. There is also another area, or underground plume, that is about 30 feet wide by 350 feet long,” according to Don Mayer, director of special projects for Entergy, quoted in an Oct. 9, 2006 New York Daily News article. “One area is predominantly leaking tritium and the other Strontium-90,” Mayer said.

Questions arise about drinking water supplies, both for nearby groundwater supplies and for municipalities in the lower Hudson that take their drinking water from the Hudson River. “Tens of thousands of gallons of water are leaching out into the ground, most of it is going into the river. It’s a serious problem,” said Phillip Musegaas, a policy analyst with the Riverkeeper.

“Understandably, people are wondering what effect radioactive isotopes found in the groundwater under the plant may or may not have on their drinking water. Additionally, Clearwater wants to know what, if any, potential impacts the leaks may be having on fish and other aquatic species living in the River. That’s why we are bringing together elected officials with experts who can provide the best scientific information available for a well-rounded and informative discussion,” said Manna Jo Greene, environmental director at Clearwater, who will facilitate the roundtable discussion.

Mark Jacobs of the Indian Point Safe Energy Coalition stressed the need for the public, as well as elected officials, to attend in order to explore and understand the intricacies involved. “Come find out what can and should be done about the unceasing leaks coming from Indian Point. An unknown number of leaks, leaking for an unknown period of time, polluting unknown locations in unknown quantities is just too many unknowns,” said Jacobs.

The session will begin at 1:30 p.m. at the Wilcox Gymnasium of Pace University’s Pleasantville campus with a technical briefing and roundtable discussion that is scheduled to last until 5 p.m. An evening roundtable panel and town meeting will be held from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. for members of the public who may be unable to attend the earlier meeting. Although there is no cost to attend, advanced registration is strongly encouraged via e-mail: katy@clearwater.org or by calling: 845-454-7673 x116.

###

TO RSVP, for further information or to request side interviews with presenters and panelists, call 845-758-0097.

Pace University to Host FIRST LEGO League Tournament

The FIRST Organization, founded by inventor Dean Kamen, creator of the Segway Human Transporter, has teamed up with the LEGO Company to create FIRST LEGO League. Pace University’s School of Computer Science and Information Systems (CSIS) will host the FIRST LEGO League Tournament, an annual event that over the last six years has encouraged children to use their imagination, work with LEGOs, and learn about science and technology in a fun and exciting way.

Contact: Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY

January 26, 2004

PACE UNIVERSITY TO HOST FIRST
(FOR INSPIRATION AND RECOGNITION OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY)
LEGO LEAGUE TOURNAMENT

This year’s challenge — Mission: Mars

WHAT: The FIRST Organization, founded by inventor Dean Kamen, creator of the Segway Human Transporter, has teamed up with the LEGO Company to create FIRST LEGO League. Pace University’s School of Computer Science and Information Systems (CSIS) will host the FIRST LEGO League Tournament, an annual event that over the last six years has encouraged children to use their imagination, work with LEGOs, and learn about science and technology in a fun and exciting way. This is the first time the tournament will be held in Westchester County and hosted by Pace University. Each year, there is a different internationally announced challenge for the tournament. This year’s challenge is Mission: Mars.

Teams of children, ages 9-14, from local schools, Girl Scout troops, and neighborhoods, have been presented with the task of designing a robotic device using LEGOs to explore and colonize a simulated, tabletop version of the Martian surface. In addition to the predetermined tournament missions that the robot will need to complete, the teams will be judged on robot design and programming, a 10-minute research presentation, and demonstrated teamwork.

WHO: Groups competing in the tournament include a team sponsored by the Westchester/Putnam Girl Scout Council, an all-girl team sponsored by MESA (Math, Engineering, Science Achievement) of White Plains Middle School, teams from other local schools (Greenburgh 7, St. Augustine’s in Ossining, St. Pius X in Scarsdale, Fox Lane Middle School) and a number of independent teams.

The tournament is run completely by volunteers, including CSIS students, staff and faculty, and members of the Westchester community. Teams of CSIS students have created a Web site to disseminate information about the tournament, have learned the Lego Mindstorms programming package and will staff an online help desk for teams and coaches during the event. CSIS students and recent graduates will serve as referees. Judges are from major corporations in the area, including IBM TJ Watson Research, Apple Computer, and Quintel Consulting.

WHEN: Sunday, February 8, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Opening ceremonies at noon.

WHERE: Pace University’s School of Computer Science and Information Systems, Goldstein Fitness Center, 861 Bedford Rd., Pleasantville, NY

For more information or to volunteer, contact Bernice Houle, (914) 773-3492, bhoule@pace.edu .

Web sites:

FIRST Organization http://www.usfirst.org/jrobtcs/flego.htm
CSIS at Pace http://csis.pace.edu

Pace University to Host Annual Science Day for High School Students, Apr. 11

More than 150 high school students from local area schools will participate in Pace University’s annual Science Day on Friday, April 11 from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Kessel Campus Center on the Pleasantville campus.

Contact: Mary E. Horgan, 914-923-2798, mhorgan@pace.edu
Angela Nally, 212-346-1505, agnally@pace.edu

Pace University to Host Annual Science Day for High School Students, Apr. 11

Dr. Patricia Aikens, staff scientist with BASF to offer keynote
“Colloids You Can Smell, Taste and Wear: The Lowdown on Personal Care Products”

PLEASANTVILLE, N. Y. – April 10, 2003 — More than 150 high school students from local area schools will participate in Pace University’s annual Science Day on Friday, April 11 from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Kessel Campus Center on the Pleasantville campus.

Science Day at Pace University, held annually since 1993, offers students a chance to demonstrate their scientific prowess, as they present research poster papers about a variety of topics. Along with the science poster session, students will view a live “Birds of Prey” demonstration by naturalist James Eyring. Students will also visit the campus’ computer center, biology and chemistry laboratories and the electronic laboratory at the Mortola Library.

Dr. Patricia Aikens, instructor of chemistry at Pace University and staff scientist with BASF will offer the keynote, “Colloids You Can Smell, Taste and Wear: The Lowdown on Personal Care Products.”

For more information contact Anne Murphy, (914) 773-3562 or
Charlene Hoegler, 914-773-3698 or e-mail: wflank@pace.edu.
For directions to the campus see: www.pace.edu.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. More than 13,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of the Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

New Study Shows Green, Black and White Teas Adversely Affect Bacterial Virus Infection

According to a new study conducted at Pace University, green, black and white teas have an adverse effect on the bacterial virus T1, which infects Escherichia coli B. The research also indicates that the anti-viral effects of oral agents such as toothpaste and mouthwash are enhanced by the addition of tea extracts.

NEW STUDY SHOWS GREEN, BLACK AND WHITE TEAS ADVERSELY AFFECT BACTERIAL VIRUS INFECTION
Results Indicate Anti-Viral Effects of Toothpaste and Mouthwash are Enhanced By Addition of Tea Extract

New York, NY – May 20, 2002 – According to a new study conducted at Pace University, green, black and white teas have an adverse effect on the bacterial virus T1, which infects Escherichia coli B. The research also indicates that the anti-viral effects of oral agents such as toothpaste and mouthwash are enhanced by the addition of tea extracts.

“Our study shows that tea has a very potent anti-viral effect on bacteriophage viability,” says Milton Schiffenbauer, Ph.D., a microbiologist and professor in the Department of Biology at Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts & Sciences and primary author of the research. “We found that the addition of polyphenol extract (a tea compound with antioxidant properties) to oral agents such as toothpaste and mouthwash significantly reduces bacterial virus infection. In some cases, total inactivation of the virus responsible for infecting Escherichia coli was achieved.”

All teas contain polyphenols or antioxidants that protect human cells from reactive atoms (free radicals) that are responsible for body tissue damage. Flavorids are a group of polyphenols that occur naturally in tea. It is suspected that the concentration level of these polyphenols in the body is responsible for the beneficial properties of tea. Polyphenols may also contribute to the prevention of various types of cancer, including pancreas, colon, bladder, prostate and breast cancer.

Several findings are of particular interest:

· The anti-viral effect of green tea (Templer loose tea) is much more substantial than the anti-viral effects of either black or white teas.

· Results using Eden organic green teas (Bancha, Genmaicha, Hojicha and Kukicha) indicate that green tea extract from tea bags is more effective than loose tea, filtered or unfiltered.

· Caffeinated green and black teas are more effective as anti-viral agents than decaffeinated green and black teas.

· Teas and polyphenol extract may have applications in the inactivation of human pathogenic viruses.

The results of this study will be presented at the 102nd General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology in Salt Lake City, Utah, May 19-23.

Dr. Schiffenbauer can be reached at (212) 346-1968 or mschiffenbauer@pace.edu .

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart Airport in New Windsor. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. (www.pace.edu)

Pace University to Host Science Day for Local High School Students

More than 150 high school students from local area schools will participate in Pace University’s annual Science Day on Friday, April 19 from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Willcox Hall on the Pleasantville campus.

PLEASANTVILLE, N. Y. – More than 150 high school students from local area schools will participate in Pace University’s annual Science Day on Friday, April 19 from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Willcox Hall on the Pleasantville campus.

Dr. Taro Takahashi, a world-known climatologist and associate director at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Labs at Columbia University will present the keynote address, at noon, titled “Carbon Dioxide & Global Warming: The Hidden Links.”

Science Day at Pace University, held annually since 1993, offers students a chance to demonstrate their scientific prowess, as they present research poster papers about a variety of topics. Along with the science poster session, students will participate in an interactive hands-on physics display by Dr. Allan Brown of Pace; and view a live “Birds of Prey” demonstration by naturalist James Eyring. Students will also visit the campus’ computer center, biology and chemistry laboratories and the electronic laboratory at the Mortola Library.

For more information contact Mrs. Anne Murphy, Tel: (914) 773-3562 or
Dr. Charlene Hoegler, Tel: (914) 773-3698, Fax: (914) 773-3634 (att. C. Hoegler) or
E-mail: wflank@pace.edu

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. More than 13,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of the Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.