Fulbright Winner with Hmong/Laotian Background Heads to Korea enroute to possible UN career

Morganton, NC resident Patricia Lee, a member of the Pace University undergraduate class of 2007, has won a prestigious Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship to teach English in a South Korean high school during the 2007-2008 school year.

CONTACTS
Julyssa Lopez, Public Information Intern (301) 256-7559
Christopher T. Cory, Executive Director of Public Information (212) 346-1117, ccory@pace.edu

Note: Lee can be reached on her cell phone at 828-443-0891

Daughter of Laotian Hmong Immigrants
Wins Fulbright to Teach English in South Korea

New York, NY, May 17, 2007 – Morganton, NC resident Patricia Lee, a member of the Pace University undergraduate class of 2007, has won a prestigious Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship to teach English in a South Korean high school during the 2007-2008 school year.

Her year in Asia will complete an international odyssey of sorts – her parents are Hmong, who immigrated to the US from Laos before settling in North Carolina – and start her on an international career.

Since 2002, 20 Pace students have received Fulbright Fellowships, earning the chance to work and conduct research in countries ranging from Israel and South Korea to France and Canada.

Lee graduates on Wednesday, May 23 in ceremonies in Radio City Music Hall at Rockefeller Center in New York City.

Watching videos. Born in California after her parents immigrated, Lee was raised to be bilingual. While she learned English at school, her parents insisted she also learn to read and write her native Hmong. She developed a passion for Korean culture after discovering Korean music at a festival. Falling in love with the language, she soon made Korean her genre of choice in movies and music, subjecting her willing roommates to evenings of watching Korean videos and making a start on becoming trilingual.

A political science major at Pace, she has on the Dean’s List since 2005. She interned at the Unitarian Universalist office at the United Nations from 2004 to 2005, writing an article on human rights violations against the Hmong which was printed in the center’s newsletter, Windows of the World, and speaking on a human rights panel during her office’s annual spring seminar.

North Carolina and New York politics. Lee has been involved in one of Pace University’s two highly-competitive Model United Nations teams since the spring of 2005, when the team won third place. The team won Outstanding Position Papers in 2006, and won Outstanding Delegation in both 2006 and 2007, with Lee serving as head delegate during the latter year.

With strong interests in politics, Lee maintains a membership in the League of Women Voters of North Carolina. During the summer of 2006, she served as an organizer for the campaign of Tom Suozzi for Governor of New York.

“Fighting for those who are threatened.” After the Fulbright year, Lee plans to pursue advanced study in the areas of human rights and international law, pointing toward an eventual career with the United Nations.

She attributes her passion for understanding, tolerance and world peace to her parents.

“My parents’ courage to live in the face of turmoil gives me strength to fight for those whose lives are threatened,”she says. “Their experiences as impoverished ethnic Hmong immigrants from Laos moving to the United States in hopes of creating a better life and future for their children is the very essence of what America is.”

Pace. For 101 years Pace University has been preparing students to become leaders in their fields by providing an education that combines exceptional academics with professional experience and the New York advantage. A private metropolitan university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

Fulbrights. The U.S. Congress created the Fulbright program in 1946, just after the end of World War II, to foster mutual understanding among nations through educational and cultural exchange. Senator J. William Fulbright, who sponsored the legislation, considered it a step toward building an alternative to armed conflict. The U.S. student program awards approximately 1,200 grants annually and currently operates in more than 150 countries worldwide.

Broadway Singers and Westchester Students to Perform at Dr. Seuss Literacy Event at Pace March 2

To celebrate Dr. Seuss’ birthday, the Center for Literacy Enrichment at Pace University School of Law in White Plains will host approximately 150 children from the Virginia Road elementary school in Valhalla.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact
Betsy Evans, Advisory Board Chair, Center for Literacy Enrichment
Pace University, 914-472-9105 Office, 914-629-1090 Cell, evans535@verizon.net
Or
Cara Halstead Cea, Public Information, Pace University,
914-773-3312 Office, 914-906-9680 Cell, chalstead@pace.edu

TODAY SHOW “ARE YOU A WHO?” CONTEST WINNER TO PERFORM AT DR. SEUSS’ 50TH BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION AT PACE UNIVERSITY

WHITE PLAINS, NY, March 1, 2007 – To celebrate Dr. Seuss’ birthday, the Center for Literacy Enrichment at Pace University School of Law in White Plains will host approximately 150 children from the Virginia Road elementary school in Valhalla.

WHAT: Nationwide celebration of Dr. Seuss’ 50th Birthday – local event featuring Seuss stories and songs for kids performed by kids and educators

WHEN: Friday, March 2nd, 9:30 – 11:30 AM

WHERE: Pace University School of Law, 78 North Broadway, White Plains, Tudor Room

Broadway singers Brianna Gentilella (Pleasantville Middle School) and Sky Jared (Chappaqua Middle School) will perform a song from “How the Grinch Stole Christmas.” Gentilella was cast in the Broadway show following her win on NBC’s Today Show in the “Are You a Who?” contest.

Cast members from J.F. Kennedy High School in Somers will also perform a number from their upcoming spring production “Seussical” the Musical. The performances will be followed by a lively reading from Seuss books by Wayne Harders, Elmsford School Principal.

The Center for Literacy Enrichment is a division of the School of Education at Pace University, a private, comprehensive institution of higher education. Conveniently located at the Pace University School of Law in White Plains, the Center for Literacy is staffed by certified reading and ESL teachers and has been providing literacy instruction to K-12 students for 30 years. For more information on the Center for Literacy, visit Pace’s School of Education website at www.pace.edu or access the page directly at page.cfm?doc_id=5964.

Click on the links below for more information on the nationwide celebrations of Dr. Seuss’ birthday.

For information from Random House and Dr. Seuss Enterprises: www.Seussville.com

For information on the 10th Anniversary of Read Across America from the National Education Association: http://www.nea.org/readacross/index.html.

Second Careers, First Loves: Retraining Professionals for Teaching

Pace University School of Education is providing an entry point into the teaching profession for career changers and college graduates who have had no previous formal study in the field of education. Since 1986, the Career Change Master of Science for Teachers (M.S.T.) degree program has enabled approximately 500 people to enter a new, more fulfilling second career.

Contact: Steve Borzoni
(212) 346-1851

NEW YORK-Pace University School of Education is providing an entry point into the teaching profession for career changers and college graduates who have had no previous formal study in the field of education. Since 1986, the Career Change Master of Science for Teachers (M.S.T.) degree program has enabled approximately 500 people to enter a new, more fulfilling second career.

One of those people is Sam Friedman of Yonkers, N.Y., who began attending classes at Pace after retiring as a satellite communications engineer at RCA. After completing the M.S.T. program, he was offered a position at the Graphic Communications Arts High School in New York City where he teaches mathematics. “My relationship with these students has been very gratifying,” says Friedman. “Working to help these kids become better students brings me a much deeper sense of satisfaction than building better satellites.”

With the M.S.T. degree and satisfactory scores on the New York State Teacher Certification Examination, students with baccalaureate degrees in fields other than education become provisionally certified to teach. They become eligible for permanent certification after two years of full-time teaching. The 36-credit program provides both theoretical frameworks and opportunities for their practical application. Students explore the different ways individuals learn, and develop their unique teaching style to meet the needs of individual students.

The average age of an M.S.T. student is about 30, although students have ranged in age from 22 to 62. Many students come to the program with experience in business and finance, science, technology, arts and communications, as well as government, military and medical backgrounds. Most are offered public school positions teaching at the elementary level.

Dr. Carol Keyes, chair of the Teacher Education department, recognizes that “the program is attracting mature professionals, who have had successful careers but now want to teach.”

“Many students find the communications, writing, managerial and organizational skills learned in their previous careers most useful when they are teaching in the classroom,” says Dr. Sandra Flank, professor of education.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law and Lienhard School of Nursing.

Pace Celebrates Year of the Rooster

“21st Annual Chinese New Year Extravaganza: Year of the Rooster,” presented by Pace University’s School of Education, along with ARTS, Inc., New York State Council on the Arts and New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

Contact:
Rossella Dipopolo, Pace University School of Education, rdipopolo@pace.edu

Rosemary Mercedes, Pace University, (212) 346-1637, rmercedes@pace.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY– INVITATION TO COVER

PACE HOSTS ANNUAL CHINESE NEW YEAR EXTRAVAGANZA

WHAT: “21st Annual Chinese New Year Extravaganza: Year of the Rooster,” presented by Pace University’s School of Education, along with ARTS, Inc., New York State Council on the Arts and New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

WHO: Students from New York City’s downtown area schools will celebrate the Chinese New Year with colorful performances, including children from PS 124 Yung Ming School and Pace University High School students. Also performing, a group of 30 seniors from Project Open Door Senior Center will present dances to “New York, New York” and “All That Jazz.”

WHEN: Wednesday, February 2, 2005
12 – 2 p.m.

WHERE: Pace University, The Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts Theater (located on Spruce Street between Gold Street and Park Row), One Pace Plaza, New York, NY.

Pace University to Host Community Chinese New Year Extravaganza

Eighty local school children from Chinatown in downtown New York will participate in Pace University’s School of Education’s 18th annual Chinese New Year Extravaganza celebrating the year of the Horse, 4700. More than 400 local school children from Chinatown and Brooklyn will come to watch the celebration. The celebration will take place at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts on Spruce and Gold Streets of the University’s downtown campus on February 6, from 12:00 – 1:30 p.m.

NEW YORK – Eighty local school children from Chinatown in downtown New York will participate in Pace University’s School of Education’s 18th annual Chinese New Year Extravaganza celebrating the year of the Horse, 4700. More than 400 local school children from Chinatown and Brooklyn will come to watch the celebration. The celebration will take place at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts on Spruce and Gold Streets of the University’s downtown campus on February 6, from 12:00 – 1:30 p.m.

To ring in the Year of the Horse children from Chinatown schools JHS 56, PS 2, and IS 131 will perform traditional Chinese dances choreographed by A.R.T.S., Inc. A children’s art exhibition will be also on display at the bookstore at One Pace Plaza, level B, from February 2 to 9 from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. There will be a special showing of the exhibit in the lobby of the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts on February 6.

The event is co-sponsored by JPMorgan Chase, United Chinese Students Association and the Office of Multicultural Affairs in conjunction with A. R. T. S., Inc. and the Chinese American Planning Council.

The Chinese New Year Extravaganza is a community event open to the public; reservations are not required for individuals but school groups should call in advance to ensure space. For access to the art exhibit please call in advance.

For more information call: Jennifer White at 212-346-1118

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

Pace University and Putnam/Northern Westchester BOCES Partner to Address Teacher Shortages

Pace University and Putnam/Northern Westchester Board Of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES) have created the Come Teach with Us Academy, an alternative certification program that will help local school districts fill teacher positions in the critical shortage areas of secondary science, math and languages other than English.

Pace University and Putnam/Northern Westchester BOCES
Partner to Address Northern Westchester and Putnam Teacher Shortages
in Math, Science and Language Disciplines

Pleasantville, NY – Pace University and Putnam/Northern Westchester Board Of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES) have created the Come Teach with Us Academy, an alternative certification program that will help local school districts fill teacher positions in the critical shortage areas of secondary science, math and languages other than English.

All candidates selected for the Come Teach With Us Academy are assured of teaching positions in Putnam or Northern Westchester County schools next fall. The participants accepted into the Academy will complete an intensive teacher-training program this spring and summer. Substantive field experience will be provided prior to placement through substitute teaching, assistant teaching, tutoring and summer school placement. Participants will continue to attend classes in late afternoons, early evenings, weekends and on-line while they are teaching and until they have completed New York State teacher certification requirements. Throughout the program participants will work with mentor teachers from both the school districts and from Pace University’s School of Education.

Courses will be held in the evenings and on weekends, beginning in March, and during
the summer at the Academy campus located in Yorktown on the BOCES campus; distance-based learning will be used for some courses as well. Pace University will provide scholarship assistance resulting in a tuition reduction.

Come Teach With Us Academy participating school districts include: Bedford, Brewster, Briarcliff, Carmel, Chappaqua, Croton-Harmon, Hendrick-Hudson, Katonah-Lewisboro, Lakeland, Mahopac, North Salem, Ossining, Peekskill, Putnam Valley, Somers and Yorktown.

Candidates will be drawn from individuals interested in changing careers, retirees seeking a second career, individuals returning to the employment arena and recent college graduates. All candidates must have a bachelors or higher degree in an area of science, mathematics or language other than English and must have demonstrated academic excellence with a grade point average of 3.0 or better. Participants will be selected through a highly selective interview process.

Interested candidates should contact: Carol Ross, Coordinator, Come Teach With Us Academy, (914) 248-2357 or e-mail: cross@pnwboces.org. or Pace University Graduate Admissions Office, (914) 422-4283, email: gradwp@pace.edu.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

Putnam/Northern Westchester BOCES is a regional education agency serving 18 school districts in northern Westchester and Putnam counties in the areas of vocational education, special education, curriculum, guidance and management.

Pace University to Partner in New York City Teaching Fellows Program

Pace University announced today its partnership with the New York City Board of Education as one of several private colleges and universities which will be a part of this year’s New York City Teaching Fellows Program.

Contact: Mary E. Horgan
(914) 923-2798
mhorgan@pace.edu

NEW YORK — Pace University announced today its partnership with the New York City Board of Education as one of several private colleges and universities which will be a part of this year’s New York City Teaching Fellows Program.

“Pace is committed to the City and its children and we are pleased to be part of this important program,” said Pace University President David A. Caputo, who is also the co-chair of the New York State Professional Standards and Practices Board for Teaching. “In order to participate, we will make up the difference between the CUNY tuition for 35 new fellows so that we can help meet the needs of the City’s children for qualified teachers.”

New York City Schools Chancellor Harold Levy launched the Teaching Fellows in 2000 as an effort to fill the many vacancies of the City’s lowest-performing schools with accomplished citizens who want to make a difference. Fellows are chosen through an intensive selection process, are trained in an accelerated pre-service program, and then begin teaching in under-performing schools. They are then required to participate in a fully funded master’s degree program while teaching.

Earlier this year the Board of Education announced that it would invite private colleges and universities to be a part of the accelerated teaching certification program. In its first year the Board worked exclusively with institutions in the City University of New York. The invitation to private higher education is one of several strategies designed to meet Chancellor Levy’s target of 2,000 fellows for this year compared to last year’s program which prepared about 350 teachers.

“We recognize the City’s urgent need for teachers and our responsibility to be involved,” said Jan McDonald, Dean of the Pace School of Education. “At present over 12,000 of the city’s 78,000 teachers are uncertified. Chancellor Levy and the Board of Regents acknowledge the need for certification and recognize the legitimate role that schools of education play in the preparation of teachers. We feel that it is important for us to be active players in defining that role.”

As a part of the commitment of the Board of Education each teaching fellow is provided with an “on-site” mentor from the school district. In addition, programs are required to provide a mentor from participating colleges and universities. “One of the most critical elements for success will be the mentoring of the teacher during the first year,” said David Avdul, who will direct the new Pace Fellows Program. “So, even though it was much more expensive, in our model we doubled the required amount of time that our university mentors would be working with the fellows.”

Colleges or universities planning to create an alternative certification program were required to have their program approved by the State. Pace received word from the New York State Education Department that its application to recommend candidates for the State’s new Transitional Certification had been approved in the middle of February. The Pace Fellow Program is projected to begin in the middle of June.

“It was in the spirit of concern for the children, faith in our ability to develop and implement a strong program, and guarded optimism that we committed ourselves to this program,” said Mary Versteck, one of the Pace faculty who served on the fellows task force. “Our task is to support the teaching profession as a profession, challenge shortsighted solutions and serve as constructive critics from the inside.”

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

Pace University’s School of Education to Co-Sponsor 10th Annual New York City History Day, March 12

For the past 10 years, the Museum of the City of New York has proudly sponsored New York City History Day, a regional contest that encourages students to study and learn about historical issues, i deas, people and events. This years’ event, co-sponsored by Pace University’s School of Education, will be held on Sunday, March 12, 2000, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Pace’s campus in lower Manhattan across from City Hall Park.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
NEW YORK – For the past 10 years, the Museum of the City of New York has proudly sponsored New York City History Day, a regional contest that encourages students to study and learn about historical issues, i deas, people and events. This years’ event, co-sponsored by Pace University’s School of Education, will be held on Sunday, March 12, 2000, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Pace’s campus in lower Manhattan across from City Hall Park.

Students from all five bor oughs will take a historic look at how turning points in history have defined the 20th century. Participants will present individual or group projects in four categories: Historical Papers, Exhibits, Documentary Presentations and Performances. A team of three judges evaluates each project, and prizes are awarded to the top three projects in each category. In addition, entrants will also be eligible for special category awards. All participants will receive a Certificate of Participation and books focu sing on NYC history.

New York City History Day is the first step toward competing in National History Day, a contest held in June at the University of Maryland at College Park. Winners from New York City History Day will advance to New York State His tory Day and then on to the national competition.

This year, National History Day has designated the theme “Turning Points in History: People, Ideas and Events.” From the invention of the wheel to the dismantling of the Berlin Wall, the efforts of coun tless people have changed everyone’s daily lives. This topic will offer students a chance to look back and discover how various historical turning points have helped shape the past and how they will continue to play a crucial role in the future.

New Yo rk City History Day is co-sponsored by Pace University’s School of Education, Citigroup, The History Channel, the Gap, the Association of Teachers of Social Studies/United Federation of Teachers and the Sheepshead Bay Historical Society. For further info rmation, please contact Mike Radice, Learning Programs Coordinator, at The Museum of the City of New York, (212) 534-1672 ext. 250.

The Museum of the City of New York is a private, not-for-profit educational agency established in 1923 to collect, preser ve and present original material related to the history of New York City. In addition to individual contributions and gifts from foundations and corporations, the Museum receives public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts, the National Endo wment for the Humanities and the National Endowment for the Arts. The City of New York, the owner of the Museum’s building, provides support in the form of operating and programmatic funds through the Department of Cultural Affairs.

Pace University is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Busi ness, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

Pace University to Host Community Chinese New Year Extravaganza

Pace University’s School of Education will present the 17th annual Chinese New Year Extravaganza celebrating the Year of the Snake, 4699, on Feb. 7th from 12:00-1:30 p.m. at the Pace Downtown Theater.

Contact: Public Affairs
(914) 923-2798
News@Pace.Edu

NEW YORK — Pace University’s School of Education will present the 17th annual Chinese New Year Extravaganza celebrating the Year of the Snake, 4699, on Feb. 7th from 12:00-1:30 p.m. at the Pace Downtown Theater.

To ring in the Year of the Snake the children from Community School District 2 will perform traditional Chinese dances choreographed by A. R. T. S., Inc. A children’s art exhibition sponsored by the Chinese American Planning Council will be on display at the Peter Fingesten Gallery, Feb. 5-12 with a special showing on Feb. 7.

The event is co-sponsored by the Pace Education Alliance and Office of Multicultural Affairs in conjunction with A. R. T. S., Inc. and the Chinese American Planning Council.

The Chinese New Year Extravaganza is a community event open to the public; reservations are not required for individuals but school groups should call in advance to ensure space. For access to the art exhibit please call in advance.

For more information call Chanida Rayanasukwongse or Ann Marie Eng at the School of Education (212) 346-1444.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

School of Education to Sponsor 15th Annual Chinese New Year Extravaganza, Feb. 10

A children’s art exhibit, traditional dances and other cultural performances
will highlight the 15th Annual Chinese New Year Extravaganza sponsored by Pace University’s
School of Education, Wednesday, February 10, on its campus in lower Manhattan. More than
700 elementary school children from the New York metropolitan area will participate in the
celebration.

Posted by Public Affairs on February 09, 1999 at 10:16:37:

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
NEW YORK – A children’s art exhibit, traditional dances and other cultural performances
will highlight the 15th Annual Chinese New Year Extravaganza sponsored by Pace University’s
School of Education, Wednesday, February 10, on its campus in lower Manhattan. More than
700 elementary school children from the New York metropolitan area will participate in the
celebration.

Beginning at 11:45 a.m., Wednesday, Feb. 10, A Southern Lion Dance, performed by the Wing
Hong Yip Dragon Style Kung Fu Club troupe, will wind through the streets near Pace University
and end at the Pace Downtown Theater on Spruce Street. The lion dance, not to be confused
with the dragon dance, is to bring good luck, good fortune, good health, prosperity, and
happiness to people and business.

More than 100 students from Community School District 2, under the direction of A.R.T.S.,
Inc., will participate in Traditional Children’s Dance Performances from noon-1:30 p.m. on
Wednesday, Feb. 10 at the Pace Downtown Theater. A.R.T.S., Inc. (Art Resources for Teachers
and Students), is a community-based resource center comprising professionals, performers and
educators who work intensively with schools in Chinatown.

A Children’s Art Exhibit will feature paintings, drawings and sculpture from pre-schoolers
from Chinatown’s Chung Pak Day Care Center, which demonstrate the students’ artistic ability
and enthusiasm to celebrate their heritage and culture. The exhibit, located at the Peter
Fingesten Art Gallery at Pace University, will be on display from Feb. 8-19. A special
viewing will be held from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. on Wednesday,Feb. 10.

The Chinese New Year Extravaganza is sponsored by The Pace University School of Education,
A.R.T.S., Inc., Chinese-American Planning Council, Chinese-American Arts Council, Pace
Education Alliance, Coalition for Diversity, Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, and The Chase Manhattan
Bank.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester
County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in
the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science
and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law and Lienhard School of Nursing.