PATCH: Have You Seen ‘The Hunger Games’?

“I think that ‘The Hunger Games’ has tapped into this audience by drawing on the dystopian fight-to-the-death genre tradition (that includes ‘Lord of the Flies,’ ‘Battle Royale,’ even ‘Running Man’), but tweaking it a bit with the female heroine,” Pace University English professor Sarah Blackwood told a Bay Area NBC station.

The Patch.com web site in Carmichael, CA, near Sacramento, quoted Pace English professor Sarah Blackwood on the frenzy surrounding the new movie “Hunger Games.”

“I think that ‘The Hunger Games’ has tapped into this audience by drawing on the dystopian fight-to-the-death genre tradition (that includes ‘Lord of the Flies,’ ‘Battle Royale,’ even ‘Running Man’), but tweaking it a bit with the female heroine,” Pace University English professor Sarah Blackwood told a Bay Area NBC station. I really believe Suzanne Collins when she said, in The New York Times Magazine, ‘I don’t write about adolescence. . . . I write about war. For adolescents.’”

Read more at the Carmichael Patch.

NEWS RELEASE: Professor available for comment on widespread appeal of Hunger Games

Sarah Blackwood, Assistant Professor of English and director of the American Studies program at Pace, has been quoted recently in media about the appeal of the new movie Hunger Games.

PACE UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR AVAILABLE FOR COMMENT ON WIDESPREAD APPEAL OF HUNGER GAMES AND OTHER POPULAR YOUNG ADULT FILMS AND BOOKS

NEW YORK, NY, March 22, 2012 – Sarah Blackwood, Assistant Professor of English and director of the American Studies program at Pace,  has been quoted recently in media about the appeal of the new movie Hunger Games, released today, after writing a popular post about Twilight and young adult heroines for the website The Hairpin (http://thehairpin.com/2011/11/our-bella-ourselves).

Her academic expertise is in pre-20th century American literature and visual culture and the invention of photography and portraiture. Older literature was popular fiction in its time, so she draws comparisons between contemporary pop culture and 19th century topics.

Blackwood has written extensively about contemporary popular culture. She has recapped the television show Friday Night Lights for the website Television Without Pity, and wrote a piece about the show for the website The Awl.

She is quoted today in this NBC Bay Area article: http://pressroom.blogs.pace.edu/2012/03/22/nbc-bay-area-a-hunger-games-primer-for-grown-ups-and-other-non-obsessives/.

She is scheduled to give an academic talk on the relationship betweencontemporary young adult heroines and 18th – 19th century
literary heroines at Bowdoin College in late April.

About Sarah Blackwood

Sarah Blackwood, PhD, is the new Assistant Professor of English on the New York City campus. Dr. Blackwood earned her PhD from Northwestern University in 2009, and her BA from University of Virginia in 1998. She was a Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Northwestern University. Her articles and essays have appeared in American Literature, The Emily Dickinson Journal, and a forthcoming edited volume of essays on Henry James entitled Henry James in Context. She is currently working on a book manuscript entitled The Portrait’s Subject: Inventing Psychology in Nineteenth-Century America. She was awarded a
Patricia and Phillip Frost Fellowship in the Study of American Art and Visual Culture at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in 2007.

About Pace University

For 105 years Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu