New Scholarship Fund for Black Music Pioneer Covered by New York Daily News Online

Pace’s new scholarship fund for black music pioneer Sydney Small was covered by New York Daily News online.

Pace’s new scholarship fund for black music pioneer Sydney Small was covered by New York Daily News online on September 16. Click on the link or read the excerpt of the text below.

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv/2010/09/16/2010-09-16_black_pioneers_legacy_to_live_on.html?r=entertainment

“A scholarship fund has been established at Pace University for the late Sydney Small, who ran WWRL (1600 AM) and was a lifelong advocate for minority voices in the mainstream media.

Small died Aug. 8 while cycling in Central Park. He was 72.

The Brooklyn native founded the National Black Network (NBN) in 1972. NBN evolved into Access 1, which owns WWRL and other radio stations.

He was a founding member of the National Association of Black Owned Broadcasters (NABOB) and a prominent spokesman for minority media ownership.

When ratings for minority stations dropped under Artbitron’s new Portable People Meter (PPM) system, he was among the station owners asking Arbitron to reassess the system.

He also helped press Madison Avenue to give minority media a greater share of advertising dollars and led NABOB’s efforts to get federal distress loans for minority broadcasters threatened by the recession.

To contribute to the Sydney L. Small scholarship fund at Pace, go to pace.edu/givenow.”

Colonial-Era Paternalism Still Hurts Blacks, Says Professor Malone in New Book on Race and Voting

That paternalistic view may be more enlightened than thinking blacks are “essentially different from, and thereby inherently inferior to, whites.” But despite the Civil Rights movement, the condescending blinders of racial paternalism have dominated “the logic of integration … from the 1960’s right up to the present,” argues Christopher Malone, a political scientist who is an associate professor at Pace University, in a new book.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts
Cara Halstead Cea, Pace University, (914)906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu
Sarah De Vos, Senior Marketing Manager, Routledge, 212-216-7824, sarah.devos@taylorandfrancis.com

Review copies may be requested from Sarah De Vos, above.

Photo editors — the cover of the book is a vivid, post-Civil War handbill showing a crowd of black people crowding to get through a door labeled “Polls.” The image is from the New York Historical Society (negative # 78876) and may be available from the society or Sarah De Vos.

COLONIAL-ERA PATERNALISM STILL HURTS BLACKS,
SAYS PACE UNIVERSITY POLITICAL SCIENTIST
IN NEW BOOK ON RACE AND VOTING

“Between Freedom and Bondage: Race, Party, and Voting Rights in the Antebellum North” published this month

NEW YORK, NY – “The mental, moral, and psychological characteristics found in blacks [are] to be overcome only under the watchful gaze of paternalistic whites.”

That paternalistic view may be more enlightened than thinking blacks are “essentially different from, and thereby inherently inferior to, whites.” But despite the Civil Rights movement, the condescending blinders of racial paternalism have dominated “the logic of integration … from the 1960’s right up to the present,” argues Christopher Malone, a political scientist who is an associate professor at Pace University, in a new book.

“Between Freedom and Bondage: Race, Party, and Voting Rights in the Antebellum North” (Routledge, 2007) puts an x-ray to the broader topic of the denial of basic rights by looking into the ways blacks obtained and lost the vote in four Northern states in the years before the Civil War.

Malone concludes that unequal treatment for blacks comes from a mix of racial belief systems, “racial conflict as an outgrowth of rapid economic and demographic change,” and “political actors [who] … prey on this racial conflict by arousing poorer white working classes.” The racial belief system still in operation, he finds, is paternalism, and it goes back further than most Americans may realize, to the early days of the republic.

Little-known struggles. Malone knows both North and South, having grown up in New Orleans and earned his PhD at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. A popular Pace teacher, he also is director of the Pforzheimer Honors College at Pace’s downtown New York campus.

His book begins with the 2006 reauthorization of the landmark Voting Rights Act first passed in 1965. His narrative then takes the reader back in time by connecting that legislation to the little-known struggles for African-Americans’ right to vote in the antebellum North.

Northerners may be surprised by his evidence that paternalism, dominant in New York State in the Revolutionary period, had receded there by the 1820s. Alexander Hamilton and his cohorts had been “willing to take a chance that blacks possessed the mental capabilities for many of the responsibilities of citizenship.” But at a state Constitutional Convention of 1821, one Samuel Young exemplified a widespread “transformation” when he bluntly said “The minds of blacks are not competent to vote. They are too degraded to estimate the value, or exercise with fidelity and discretion this important right.”

Joining scholars who refute the notion that expansion of the franchise in the U.S. has been steady and “inevitable,” Malone writes: “Nothing is ever inevitable when it comes to the basic rights in American democracy.”

In an epilogue, Malone returns to contemporary racial politics and argues that the unfinished quality of the “Two Reconstructions” – the post- Civil War era and the modern civil rights movement – can be better understood by grasping what happened for African Americans in the early years of the Republic.

Historic blue blood on modern ideas. In a pre-publication review Leon Wynter, author of “American Skin: Pop Culture, Big Business, and the End of White America,” notes that “The party names have evolved …. and even rotated over 300 years, but Malone still draws a straight sociopolitical line between the North’s original blue-blood, slave-holding revolutionaries of 1776 and today’s race politics of paternalism, on both sides of the ideological fence.”

Adds Frances Fox Piven, Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Sociology at the CUNY Graduate Center and author of numerous books on social movements and voting in the United States, “Malone shows that the basic democratic issue of who shall vote was intimately entwined with the role of race in the economy, in partisan competition, and ultimately in political culture.”

For 101 years Pace University has combined exceptional academics with professional experiences and the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling more than 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

The “N” Word: Pace University Conference to Promote Intellectual Discourse

The Office of Diversity Programs at Pace University is presenting a forum for dialogue about the slur commonly known as the “N-word.” The 2007 Pace University Drive-In Conference: Laid to Rest? The N-Word and Other Language of “Dissed” Respect is intended to promote intellectual discourse about what is arguably the most infamous word in American culture.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact:
Cara Halstead Cea, Public Information, Pace University
914-773-3312 (Office), 914-906-9680 (Cell) chalstead@pace.edu

THE “N” WORD: PACE UNIVERSITY CONFERENCE TO PROMOTE INTELLECTUAL DISCOURSE

November 2 at Pace’s Pleasantville campus

The Office of Diversity Programs at Pace University is presenting a forum for dialogue about the slur commonly known as the “N-word.” The 2007 Pace University Drive-In Conference: Laid to Rest? The N-Word and Other Language of “Dissed” Respect is intended to promote intellectual discourse about what is arguably the most infamous word in American culture.

When: November 2, 8:00 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Where: Pace University Pleasantville campus, Kessel Campus Center

Who: Public admission is $95. Registration fee waived for Pace University faculty, staff, and current students as well as for current high school students. Valid ID is required. Media admission by press pass.

The morning to late afternoon event includes panel discussions with notables such as Michaela Angela Davis, a hip-hop feminist, fashion, lifestyle and pop culture commentator, and former executive fashion and beauty editor of ESSENCE magazine, Jabari Asim, author of “The N Word: Who Can Say It, Who Shouldn’t And Why”, and Wilbur Alderidge, Regional Director, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Westchester/Rockland County Chapter. There will also be workshops and speeches throughout the day. One workshop hosted by Dax-Devlon Ross, a teacher and basketball coach who works with urban youth, called Young, Black and Conflicted: The Uses and Abuses of the “N” Word, aims to get participants to reflect on how our beliefs and society mold us. Another workshop to be led by “Sance,” a rap artist, is called The Power of Labels in Hip Hop and will engage the audience in a game with the aim of teaching them how devastating it is to use inappropriate names in dealing with others.

Founded in 1906, Pace University educates achievers who are engaged with critical issues both locally and globally. Known for its outcome-oriented environment that prepares students to succeed in a wide-range of professions, Pace has three campuses, including New York City (downtown and midtown Manhattan), Westchester (Pleasantville, Briarcliff, and the White Plains Graduate Center), and the Pace School of Law in White Plains. The Pace Hudson Valley Center is located in Orange County New York. A private metropolitan university, Pace enrolls more than 14,000 students in undergraduate, masters, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Ivan G. Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, and School of Education. Visit Pace University at www.pace.edu.

Pace announces “Not On Our Watch” to intensify anti-hatred values

Pace University President David A. Caputo today announced a new initiative, “Not On Our Watch,” to intensify the University’s extensive efforts to combat intolerance and hatred and promote understanding and acceptance of diverse groups.

Contact: Christopher Cory, Executive Director of Public Information
917-608-8164 (cell), ccory@pace.edu (email via blackberry)

Pace University statement announcing
“Not on Our Watch” anti-hate campaign

Thursday, October 19, 2006

Pace University President David A. Caputo today announced a new initiative, “Not On Our Watch,” to intensify the University’s extensive efforts to combat intolerance and hatred and promote understanding and acceptance of diverse groups. He said:

“Since several recent hate crime incidents, Pace University has aggressively reached out to our many student organizations and campus councils that are concerned with promoting acceptance and combating intolerance. All of them are responding with deep concern and constructive suggestions.

“We also have contacted outside organizations, and I welcome the offers of cooperation we have received from the New York office of the Council on American Islamic Relations, the Anti Defamation League, and the US Department of Justice.

“The hateful acts against our community are rare in the history of this university, but they are intolerable acts against individuals and groups of individuals who are valued, respected and welcome members of our university community, and they are attacks against the very foundation of the University itself.

“I have asked all faculty and staff members and students to unequivocally condemn these actions and reach out to all members of our community with understanding, acceptance and compassion.

“I also announced a fresh anti-hate effort, building on our long tradition of campus activities against intolerance and for understanding and acceptance. This is being led by our Affirmative Action Officer, Lisa Miles JD. Since Monday this team has requested or held consultations and meetings with
• The New York office of the Council on American Islamic Relations
• the Anti Defamation League
• the US Department of Justice
• The Pace University President’s Commission on Diversity
• Pace Faculty Councils Downtown and in Westchester
• Administrative Councils (staff councils) Downtown and in Westchester
• Student clubs concerned with multiculturalism, gender and sexual orientation
• Separate meeting with Muslim Students Association
• Meeting of Downtown Campus student government and student club officers (Westchester Campus leaders meeting scheduled for Friday, 10/20)
• Pace Coalition for Diversity (15-year old Downtown Campus group)
• Pace Westchester Diversity Team (Westchester equivalent of Coalition for Diversity)

“Not on Our Watch”

“Based on the input so far, this team has approved plans for an intensified program to be called ‘Not on Our Watch.’ It includes
• Sensitivity training for students and the President’s Council of senior university administrators (planning and execution will involve CAIR, the Pace Muslim Students Association and many other the diversity groups on our campuses)
• First-responder training on proper protocols for incidents of bias by the Regional Director of Community Relations Services for the US Department of Justice (Reinaldo Rivera) for security officers and a broader team that will respond to bias incidents.
• Public forums on our New York City and Westchester campuses with panelists, Q&A, and open mikes, probably during week of Nov 6th.
• Distribution of a wallet card listing phone numbers for the University Safety and Security Department, Deans for Students, Residential Life, Counseling center, Health care center, Affirmative Action Office and Ombuds Office. This responds to input from students who said they weren’t sure who to call in emergencies.

“This was a surprise to us because incidents of intolerance are extremely rare here. But it indicates a set of issues we have to deal with and gives us a moment to act when we have people’s attention. Longer range programming is also being planned. — we are intensifying an ongoing, sustained effort.

“Pace does not pretend intolerance doesn’t exist. We are facing these incidents with the utmost concern, squarely and in public.

“Our tradition is to support students who are affected by intolerance, giving them systems for figuring out what they want to do about it and nurturing them through the process. These range from individual counseling to mentoring student groups to faculty encouragement to study social issues.

“When an internal survey in 2003-2004 asked students to say if they agreed or disagreed with the statement “I feel I need to hide some characteristics of my racial and ethnic culture in order to fit in at Pace,” only 11 percent of both undergraduate and graduate students agreed.

“Pace deplores as hateful incidents of bias of whatever kind. Bias is not only an attack on people, but on the fundamental nature of a University and people’s ability to learn from one another.

“While the investigation continues, and afterward, we welcome information and constructive ideas.

“Anyone with information that might be relevant to the investigation of these incidents should call the NYPD Hate Crimes unit

“Suggestions about anti-bias activities should go to Lisa Miles, e-mail lmiles@pace.edu or call 212-346-1310.”

Facts about Pace University anti-bias activities:

Pace is actively involved in the fight against hatred and intolerance, and in promoting understanding and acceptance. Our current efforts build on a long and deep tradition of community service and multicultural awareness programs. These are scheduled year after year by both the University and student groups, and many of this year’s events were scheduled well before these incidents.

In any given year our student organizations are likely to include those formed by students whose backgrounds reflect many ethnicities as well as organizations for women and students who are Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, InterQueer and Questioning.

During the University’s Centennial in calendar 2006 the Centennial Committee alone presented or co-sponsored Freeman Hrabowski, president of the University of Maryland/Baltimore County, on attracting minority group members to higher education and science; a two-day symposium on the legacies of slavery and feminism in the works of fugitive slave Harriet Jacobs ( author of “Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl: Written by Herself”); Maya Angelou; and a multinational colloquium of law professors from 44 first, second and third-world countries on enforcing global environmental laws.

Other current and past programs include forums on Palestine and Zionism, AIDS, American Indians, Hispanic multilingual cartoons, and SAFEZONE training to increase tolerance for different sexual orientations.

Community service is now a required component of the core curriculum.

The University is a founder of Project Pericles, a coalition of colleges explicitly committed to encouraging lifelong engagement by citizens in democratic processes.

Classic Case Study: Al Roker Will Moderate Lubin Discussion on Muscle of Minority Markets on Oct. 15

A classic business case study comes to life at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. The “Today” show’s Al Roker will moderate a discussion of race and business in light of the experience of companies, notably Pepsi Cola, when in the 1940’s they discovered the economic muscle of minority markets. One of the last surviving members of the historic Pepsi team will speak.

Calendar listing
AL ROKER TO MODERATE DISCUSSION OF MINORITY MARKETS,
COLOR BARRIERS, IN BUSINESS THEN AND NOW
AT PACE UNIVERSITY DOWNTOWN CAMPUS OCTOBER 15

WHAT: A classic business case study comes to life at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. The “Today” show’s Al Roker will moderate a discussion of race and business in light of the experience of companies, notably Pepsi Cola, when in the 1940’s they discovered the economic muscle of minority markets. One of the last surviving members of the historic Pepsi team will speak.

WHO:
• Julian C. Nicholas, a member of Pepsi Cola’s “Special Markets team,” one of the first all-black marketing groups that helped break the corporate color barrier in the 1940’s. Undergraduate head of the Pace student marketing club, he later became a State Department officer and head of protocol for Jimmy Carter’s inauguration.
• Richard Zannino, CEO, Dow Jones & Company and a Pace MBA (1984)
• Maurice Cox, Vice President of Corporate Development and Diversity, PepsiCo
• Stephanie Capparell, a senior special writer at The Wall Street Journal and author of “The Real Pepsi Challenge,” the recent book about the Pepsi Special Markets Team.

WHEN: Monday, October 15, 11:00 a.m. to 1 p.m.

WHERE: Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, Pace University downtown campus, 1 Pace Plaza (east of City hall on Spruce between Park Row and Gold St.)

RESERVATIONS: Open to the public. Advance reservations required. Contact Matrisha Blyden, mblyden@pace.edu. 212-618-6592.

OTHER: The event (www.pace.edu/lubin/pepsi.) is the kickoff of Pepsi’s celebration of the 60th anniversary of the formation of this sales team, and is part of the Executives in Residence series of Pace’s Lubin School of Business. Other executives scheduled so far for this academic year include media mogul Robert F.X. Sillerman (American Idol, Elvis, David Beckham) and Home Shopping Network personality Joy Mangano, President of Ingenious Designs.

Contacts:
Tom Schuyler, M. Booth and Associates for Pace University, 212-481-7000, toms@mbooth.com
(WSJ Books) Rose Ellen D’Angelo, 212-416-2000, roseellen.dangelo@wsj.com
(Simon & Schuster) Jessica Elkin, 212-698-7426, jessica.elkin@simonandschuster.com

Classic Case Study: Al Roker Will Moderate Lubin Discussion on Muscle of Minority Markets Oct. 15

A classic business case study comes to life at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. The “Today” show’s Al Roker will moderate a discussion of race and business in light of the experience of companies, notably Pepsi Cola, when in the 1940’s they discovered the economic muscle of minority markets. One of the last surviving members of the historic Pepsi team will speak.

News Release:
Calendar listing
AL ROKER TO MODERATE DISCUSSION OF MINORITY MARKETS,
COLOR BARRIERS, IN BUSINESS THEN AND NOW
AT PACE UNIVERSITY DOWNTOWN CAMPUS OCTOBER 15

WHAT: A classic business case study comes to life at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. The “Today” show’s Al Roker will moderate a discussion of race and business in light of the experience of companies, notably Pepsi Cola, when in the 1940’s they discovered the economic muscle of minority markets. One of the last surviving members of the historic Pepsi team will speak.

WHO:
• Julian C. Nicholas, a member of Pepsi Cola’s “Special Markets team,” one of the first all-black marketing groups that helped break the corporate color barrier in the 1940’s. Undergraduate head of the Pace student marketing club, he later became a State Department officer and head of protocol for Jimmy Carter’s inauguration.
• Richard Zannino, CEO, Dow Jones & Company and a Pace MBA (1984)
• Maurice Cox, Vice President of Corporate Development and Diversity, PepsiCo
• Stephanie Capparell, a senior special writer at The Wall Street Journal and author of “The Real Pepsi Challenge,” the recent book about the Pepsi Special Markets Team.

WHEN: Monday, October 15, 11:00 a.m. to 1 p.m.

WHERE: Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, Pace University downtown campus, 1 Pace Plaza (east of City hall on Spruce between Park Row and Gold St.)

RESERVATIONS: Open to the public. Advance reservations required. Contact Matrisha Blyden, mblyden@pace.edu. 212-618-6592.

OTHER: The event (www.pace.edu/lubin/pepsi.) is the kickoff of Pepsi’s celebration of the 60th anniversary of the formation of this sales team, and is part of the Executives in Residence series of Pace’s Lubin School of Business. Other executives scheduled so far for this academic year include media mogul Robert F.X. Sillerman (American Idol, Elvis, David Beckham) and Home Shopping Network personality Joy Mangano, President of Ingenious Designs.

Contacts:
Tom Schuyler, M. Booth and Associates for Pace University, 212-481-7000, toms@mbooth.com
(WSJ Books) Rose Ellen D’Angelo, 212-416-2000, roseellen.dangelo@wsj.com
(Simon & Schuster) Jessica Elkin, 212-698-7426, jessica.elkin@simonandschuster.com

Lecture to explore war on terror, Islamophobia, queer sexuality

Little-recognized links between war on terror, Islamophobia
and queer sexuality to be explored at Pace University September 10
by path breaking scholar Jasbir Puar

News Release:
Contacts: Dr. Sid Ray, Dep’t of English, Pace University, 212-346-1289, gray@pace.edu
Chris Cory, Pace Public Information, 212-346-1117 or 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

Queer times indeed:
Little-recognized links between war on terror, Islamophobia
and queer sexuality to be explored at Pace University September 10
by path breaking scholar Jasbir Puar

“A woman who is destined to change the way we think about race and sexuality”

New York, NY, August 31, 2007 – Counterterrorism and nationalism, among other contemporary forces, are realigning groups and ideas dealing with sexuality, race, gender, nation, class and ethnicity. An analysis of those changes will be presented by the interdisciplinary cultural analyst Jasbir K. Puar at Pace University’s downtown Manhattan campus Monday, September 10.

Speaking a day before the sixth anniversary of the 9/11 attack on the World Trade Center, Puar will preview her book, forthcoming in November titled, “Terrorist Assemblages: Homonationalism in Queer Times” (Duke University Press). Puar is an Associate Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at Rutgers University who has increasingly been in demand as a speaker on major US campuses in the last few years.

Her lecture takes place September 10 at 6:00 PM in the Student Union at 1 Pace Plaza, just east of City Hall. It is free and open to the public. Media admission by press pass.

Sid Ray, chair of Pace’s Women’s Studies program and a member of the English department, describes Puar as “vivacious, erudite and increasingly-influential, a woman who is destined to change the way we thank about race and sexuality. Her work on torture, Islamophobia, sexuality and the war on terror is exciting and pertinent.”

Torture and profiling.
Puar’s book highlights “troublesome” patterns in feminist and queer responses to the Abu Ghraib photographs, in the triumphal responses of queer activists to the Supreme Court’s Lawrence decision repealing anti-sodomy laws, in the measures Sikh Americans and South Asian diasporic queers take to avoid being profiled as terrorists, and in the growing Islamophobia Puar finds within global queer organizing.

Puar’s recent publications have dealt with ways the US defines what is normal — “Mapping U.S. Homonormativities” (February 2006), and with Iraq — “On Torture: Abu Ghraib” (Fall 2005).

Puar’s work and presentations draw on sources ranging from films and television to governmental texts, legal decisions, ethnographic data, queer media, and activist organizing manifestos.

For 101 years Pace University has combined exceptional academics with professional experiences and the New York metropolitan area’s “edge.” A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York. It enrolls nearly 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

On-Campus Campaign Against Hate, Promoting Respect and Understanding

In the wake of incidents in which two copies of the Qur’an were found in toilets and other racial and ethnic slurs were found on its campuses, Pace University today announced the start of a campaign to intensify its traditional acceptance of all groups on camps regardless of religion, race, ethnicity or gender orientation.

Contact
Christopher T. Cory, Executive Director, Public Information, Pace University
212-346-1117, ccory@pace.edu, cell 917-608-8164

Note: Most sessions are open to media with press credentials. Please contact the Public Information office for details.

PACE UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCES ON-CAMPUS CAMPAIGN
AGAINST HATE, PROMOTING RESPECT AND UNDERSTANDING

“Not on My Watch” goal is to “encourage all of us to take responsibility,”
says President David A. Caputo

New York, NY and Pleasantville, NY, November 14, 2006 – In the wake of incidents in which two copies of the Qur’an were found in toilets and other racial and ethnic slurs were found on its campuses, Pace University today announced the start of a campaign to intensify its traditional acceptance of all groups on camps regardless of religion, race, ethnicity or gender orientation.

The incidents are under police investigation as hate crimes. President David A. Caputo, called the campaign “comprehensive and pro-active.”

The effort is known as “Not on My Watch.” Caputo said the name stresses the need for active cooperation from each member of the community, in actions ranging from understanding others to reporting incidents. “The goal is to encourage all of us to take responsibility,” he said.

In its first few weeks, “Not on My Watch” will comprise
• A three- hour panel discussion on sacred texts in all religions, including the Bible and the Qur’an, on November 20 in Lecture Hall North, One Pace Plaza, from 6 to 9 p.m. Taught by faculty members in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, the discussion will explore: What is a sacred text?; How does reading a sacred text differ from reading a secular text?; What – if any – responsibilities do we have to texts that other people hold sacred?; Is it possible to desecrate a sacred text?

• Two hour teach-ins on the Westchester campus in Pleasantville Tuesday, November 28, from 1 to 3 pm, and on the downtown New York City campus Thursday, November 30, from 3 to 5 pm. A faculty panel will discuss the meaning of hate crimes and the impact that they have on the community. In addition, the sessions will provide an open forum for dialogue about the recent incidents and an opportunity for questions about different cultures, groups, or practices. Information on Islam has been developed in consultation with the Conference on American Islamic Relations.

• “Campus of Difference,” a program developed and facilitated by the Anti Defamation League, offered over the next few weeks to Resident Assistants and student leaders.

• “Faculty tip sheets” developed by the University’s counseling department for faculty members willing to lead class discussions.

• Circulation of a resolution condemning hate and intolerance passed by the Student Government Association on the Downtown Manhattan campus.

• Distribution of a wallet card listing emergency phone numbers for the University Safety and Security Department, Deans for Students, Residential Life, Counseling center, Health care center, Affirmative Action Office and Ombuds Office. This responds to input from students who said they weren’t sure who to call.

• A training initiative that started at the top November 8 with a 90-minute cultural awareness workshop for the 30 members of the President’s Council (senior administrators and deans of students and of the University’s six schools). Conducted by the regional director of the US Justice Department’s Community Relations Service, it explored the roots of disrespect, its painful impact, and protocols for reinforcing tolerance and acceptance and dealing with specific incidents.

• Training sessions for first responders including the campus security staff, to update them on procedures for dealing with victims and collecting evidence.

Longer-term activities are under development as well. A team of faculty and staff members working on internationalizing the curriculum as an “Internationalization Laboratory” of the American Council on Education this week agreed to explore new curriculum units on religious, racial, ethnic, gender, class, and geo-political differences. The goal, as one member put it: “to lead our students to new levels of respect and understanding.”

Reinforcing norms. The effort was developed under the leadership of Lisa Miles JD, the University’s Affirmative Action Officer.

On campus surveys show acceptance of others is a widespread norm at Pace. When an internal survey in 2003-2004 asked students to say if they agreed or disagreed that “I feel I need to hide some characteristics of my racial and ethnic culture in order to fit in at Pace,” only 10 percent of both undergraduate and graduate students agreed.

More recently, the National Survey of Student Engagement found Pace students above national norms in reporting that they have serious conversations with fellow students of a different race or ethnicity.

In planning “Not on My Watch,” Miles has sought buy-in from a broad range of campus organizations including the Pace University President’s Commission on Diversity; faculty councils in Downtown New York City and Westchester; councils of administrators and staff members; the Pace Coalition for Diversity, a 15-year old organization on the Downtown campus, and its Westchester equivalent, the Pace Westchester Diversity Team; student clubs concerned with multiculturalism, gender and sexual orientation including the Muslim Students Association, and the officers of other student clubs and the student governments.

“Pace does not pretend intolerance doesn’t exist,” said Miles. “It has not attempted to cover up these incidents and has faced them with the utmost concern, starting with the President’s messages to everyone on campus.”

Supporting students. She added that Pace’s practice is to support students who are affected by intolerance, giving them systems for figuring out what they want to do about it and nurturing them through the process. These range from individual counseling to mentoring student advocacy groups to faculty encouragement to study social issues.

“Not on My Watch” builds on pluralism at Pace that stretches back to its founding 100 years ago when it welcomed women to classes in accounting, then an all-male field. The University’s 13,500 students are 40% Caucasian, 8% Hispanic, 8% Asian/Pacific Islander, 9% African American, 6% International and 29% other/unidentified.

Recently-Escaped Slave to Join Presentation on Persistence of Racial Problems

This Roundtable discussion will link contemporary global issues of race and gender to the history of slavery.

MEDIA ALERT
Contacts: Christopher T. Cory, 212-346-1117, Cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu
Frank Lentini, 212-481-7000 ext. 3223, frankl@mbooth.com

RECENTLY-ESCAPED SUDANESE SLAVE,
FORMER GORE-LIEBERMAN CAMPAIGN MANAGER
TO PROVIDE FRESH IDEAS ON PERSISTENCE OF RACIAL PROBLEMS
FRIDAY AT 1:00 PM

Thought leaders debate the “centrality of slavery” in contemporary issues of race and gender
Who:
• Mende Nazer, Nubian who was sold into slavery in Khartoum at age 12 and who made a break for freedom in London, later writing her recent memoir, “Slave.”
• Donna Brazile, leading political strategist whose ideas currently help shape the Democratic platform on race and who was the first African American woman to run a national election campaign (Gore-Lieberman 2000).
• Michel Martin, Emmy-winning former ABC Nightline correspondent and Wall Street Journal reporter who will host a public affairs and cultural program soon slated to launch on National Public Radio.
• Leon Wynter, author and journalist who created and wrote a Business & Race column for The Wall Street Journal and has written for The Washington Post, National Public Radio’s Morning Edition and Marketplace.

What:
Roundtable discussion linking contemporary global issues of race and gender to the history of slavery. Will address such questions as:
• How can slavery be making comebacks in some societies well over 100 years after its official abolition in the western world?
• What is the equivalent of “whiteness” in one of those societies, the Sudan?
• Why don’t whites and blacks see their differing social circumstances more clearly?
• Since slaves are “made,” can they slaves be “unmade?”

Where & When:
Friday, October 6th, 2006
1:00pm – 2:45pm
Pace University Downtown Campus
Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, 1 Pace Plaza (3 Spruce St. between Park Row and Gold St., just east of City Hall)

Participants are available for interviews. The discussion is part of a two-day national conference on the writings and life of Harriet Jacobs, the increasingly well known author who is the only African-American woman held in slavery whose papers are known to exist. For the complete conference schedule please visit www.pace.edu/dyson/HarrietJacobsConf/

Freeman Hrabowski to Speak on Cultural Diversity as Key to International Competitiveness

Freeman A. Hrabowski, PhD, president of the University of Maryland – Baltimore County (UMBC) and one of the few African-Americans to run a predominantly white research institution will speak about “Fostering Inclusion in Academia”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

** MEDIA ADVISORY**

EDUCATION INNOVATOR TO WARN
THAT CULTURAL DIVERSITY IS KEY
TO INTERNATIONAL COMPETITIVENESS

Innovative African-American president of University of Maryland/Baltimore County
to discuss lessons for widening inclusion
in Centennial speech at Pace University

WHO: Freeman A. Hrabowski, PhD, president of the University of Maryland – Baltimore County (UMBC) and one of the few African-Americans to run a predominantly white research institution will speak about “Fostering Inclusion in Academia”

WHEN: February 9, 2006, 12:00p.m.

WHERE: Pace University
One Pace Plaza, Multi-Purpose Room
New York, NY
* This event is free and open to the public
** Attending media must be credentialed

WHAT: Kicking off Black History Month, Freeman Hrabowski will join forces with Pace to speak about the United States’ capacity to respond to and embrace its growing diversity as a major determinant of global competitiveness. Hrabowski believes that colleges and universities will have a central role to play in preparing Americans for these changes.

Hrabowski has spent the majority of his professional career studying and improving minority academic participation and achievement. He has been enormously successful in producing a pipeline of minority graduates who go on to top graduate and professional schools and earn advanced degrees. Hrabowski was named a top innovator by Fast Company magazine.

This presentation is an early event in Pace University’s 2006 Centennial Celebration, marking Pace’s evolution into a full range private university providing opportunity and educating achievers in liberal arts and sciences, business, nursing, education, information technology and law.

For more information, please log-on to www.pace.edu/centennial

CONTACT: Cara Halstead Cea, Pace University, 914-773-3312, chalstead@pace.edu

Rosemary Mercedes, Pace University, 212-346-1637, rmercedes@pace.edu