Forbes: “Multi-generational Households: Surprise, It’s Not Necessarily A Nightmare”

Living with mom and dad, again, isn’t half bad. So shows the latest data from Pew Research Center. Among the three-in-ten of those surveyed, ages 25-34 who’ve had to shuffle back home during the Great Recession, nearly 80 percent of them say things are working out and they are optimistic about their financial future.

A Pew Research analysis of Census Bureau data shows that the share of Americans living in multi-generational family households is the highest it has been since the 1950s, having increased significantly in the past five years,

Adults ages 25-34 are among the most likely to be living in multi-generational households (mostly with their parents). In 2010, 21.6 percent lived this way, up from 15.8 percent in 2000, reports Forbes Contributor Sheryl Nance-Nash, in the article “Multi-generational Households: Surprise, It’s Not Necessarily A Nightmare.” 

While economically returning to the nest has its rewards, it’s not always a smooth transition. What’s the key to making it work?

Be sensitive.

Don’t focus on past conflicts … Generational differences around parenting should be acknowledged. Grandparents and parents may have markedly different viewpoints on child rearing  than their children do. “Honoring these differences should be an active part of the dialogue in the household, especially if there are small children being reared,” says Richard Shadick, PhD, director of the Counseling Center and adjunct professor of psychology at Pace University.

NEWS RELEASE: Ask a Question; Save a Life. Pace University Receives Grant for Online Training of Faculty and Staff in Suicide Prevention

QPR (Question, Persuade, Refer) is a nationally recognized suicide prevention program designed to educate persons to recognize and respond to the signs of suicidal thinking or behavior. Research has shown that those who ultimately attempt suicide often provide numerous direct or indirect clues as to their intentions. Contact Dr. Richard Shadick at shadick@pace.edu or 212-346-1526 to sign up for online training and learn how you can save a life.

Pace University Receives Grant for Online Training of Faculty and Staff in Suicide Prevention;  Gatekeeper Approach Strengthens “Community Connectedness” to Detect and Treat At-Risk Individuals

 – Suicide is the third leading cause of death for 15-24 year olds –

NEW YORK, NY, March 21, 2012 – Pace University’s Counseling Center, New York City campus, has received a one-time, $6,000 mini-grant from the QPR Institute for the implementation of a local online suicide prevention training program.

“Suicide remains the third leading cause of death among the 15-24 year old age group, of which most college students fall within,” said Richard Shadick, Ph.D., Director of Pace’s Counseling Center in New York City and an adjunct Professor of Psychology.Stigma of mental health services can prevent students from getting the attention they need.  Seventy-five percent of students who die by suicide never come for counseling.  While suicide is one of the most preventable forms of death, doing so is quite complex.  Pace will use this grant to train faculty and staff in a simple gatekeeper procedure that follows CPR and can save lives.”

QPR involves these three simple steps:

  • Question … a person about suicide
  • Persuade … the person to get help
  • Refer …the person to the appropriate resource

To date, more than one million Americans have been trained in the QPR Gatekeeper Training for Suicide Prevention program. QPR (Question, Persuade, Refer) is an evidence-based, Suicide Prevention Resource Center/American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (SPRC/AFSP) registered “best practice” program taught in classrooms by more than 5,000 Certified Instructors throughout the U.S. and abroad.

Ask a Question; Save a Life 

“What can be done to help individuals who are suicidal? Knowing the warning signs and symptoms of suicide can help,” advised Dr. Shadick. ”Suicidal individuals can be depressed, hopeless, angry, or socially isolated. They often have difficulty with sleeping or eating and demonstrate obvious changes in their appearance. Students who are suicidal have significant academic or financial problems or experience a significant loss, such as a relationship break up, divorce, or move. Suicidal individuals also talk about dying-either indirectly, such as saying that they want to end their pain or make it all go away, or directly, such as stating that they want to kill themselves. Students whom have attempted to kill themselves in the past are particularly at risk for future suicide death. Finally, with college students a significant proportion of suicides involve drug or alcohol use.”

QPR’s online suicide prevention program “gatekeeper” training takes about an hour.  A gatekeeper is someone who knows the basics about suicide and intervention skills, believes that suicide can be prevented and can assist in the aftermath of suicide.  The three formal goals of the program are:

  • Goal 1: Build community capacity to prevent suicide by strengthening community connectedness through gatekeeper training designed to detect and treat at-risk persons before a suicide attempt or completion occurs.
  • Goal 2: Reduce the frequency and base rates of suicide attempts and completions in communities experiencing increasing and high rates of suicide events (attempts and fatalities).
  • Goal 3: Establish sustainable suicide prevention programming and staff infrastructure at the community level through a public-private partnership. 

If someone is talking about killing themselves or is experiencing some of these symptoms, it is essential to intervene,” added Dr. Shadick.  “One should listen without judgment and acknowledge the pain they are suffering. Even if they downplay their symptoms, one should take them seriously. It is essential to get them to a psychologist quickly. Sometimes a college student may feel that there is a stigma connected to going to a campus counseling center. One should let them know that the counseling center is another form of academic support just like a writing center or tutoring service and that many students go to these centers for a wide variety of concerns, not because they are mentally ill.”

Members of the Pace Community who are interested in participating in the QPR Gatekeeper Training for Suicide Prevention program should contact Dr. Shadick directly at rshadick@pace.edu, 212-346-1526.

About Pace University

For 105 years Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Media Contact: Samuella Becker, sbecker2@pace.edu, 212-346-1637 or 917-734-5172 

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The New York Times: A Postwar Picture of Resilience – NYTimes.com

Pace psychology professor Anthony Mancini wrote an Op-ed on post-war resilience that was published in The New York Times in print and online on February 6.

Pace psychology professor Anthony Mancini wrote an Op-ed that was published in The New York Times in print on February 6, 2012, on page A23 of the New York edition with the headline: A Postwar Picture of Resilience.

Here’s what appeared in print and online:

WHEN the United States announced last week that its combat troops in Afghanistan would be withdrawn by mid-2013, there was obvious relief. But it was followed by familiar concerns.

One of the biggest of those concerns is the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder among the tens of thousands of returning veterans, which according to some media reports runs as high as 35 percent. These reports have incited fears that we will soon face a PTSD epidemic. But are such fears justified?

According to mounting scientific evidence, they are not. In fact, the prevalence of PTSD among veterans of recent wars is about 10 percent — substantially lower than is commonly believed. Indeed, the picture emerging is one of remarkable psychological resilience among the military.

This story of resilience has been ignored, partly because many assume that humans are inherently vulnerable to trauma. That belief makes us receptive to messages, most delivered by the media, that reinforce this perspective.

A growing body of scientific research, though, is telling another story: in short, that a traumatic event does not necessarily sentence a person to PTSD. Although an exact figure cannot be determined, a series of population-based studies has provided estimates that it occurs in just 5 percent to 20 percent of service members deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan, with most studies hovering around 10 percent. In a representative study soon to be published in the British Journal of Psychiatry, my colleagues and I examined stress responses among more than 7,000 members of all United States service branches, before and after their deployments. The respondents were not seeking treatment and were representative of the military as a whole. Perhaps most important, their reports were confidential and had no bearing on their military careers.

About 83 percent of respondents showed a pattern of resilience: they exhibited a normal-range ability to cope with stress both before and after deployment. By contrast, fewer than 7 percent showed signs of PTSD following deployment. Surprisingly, these numbers improved among those with multiple deployments, with 84.9 percent showing resilience and only 4 to 5 percent with PTSD. Predictably, those with more severe combat experiences, like witnessing death and injury to others, were at greater risk.

Statistics like these are unlikely to generate headlines for understandable reasons. We do not want to stigmatize those with the disorder. Nor do we want to suggest that war is easily managed or that the problem is not of the utmost importance. Even an estimate of 1 in 10 represents a public health issue of the first magnitude, requiring our full attention and resources.

War exacts immense demands on the human capacity to cope, but a forthright recognition of our capacity for resilience does no disservice to the afflicted.

With these challenges ahead of us, we should remember that PTSD is a treatable condition and that a realistic and informed understanding of our inherent coping abilities can only assist treatment and, perhaps one day, even prevention of this debilitating disorder.

Anthony D. Mancini is an assistant professor of psychology at Pace University.

A version of this op-ed appeared in print on February 6, 2012, on page A23 of the New York edition with the headline: A Postwar Picture of Resilience.

A Postwar Picture of Resilience – NYTimes.com.

The CollegeSurfing Insider: “Big Test – Studying During the Holidays as an Adult Student”

As Thanksgiving approaches, the distractions increase … with thoughts of turkey, shopping, and family time taking you away from studying, writing papers, and finishing end-of-the-semester college projects. With these top tips, you can enjoy your holiday traditions (yum, pumpkin pie!) and finish up the semester strong.

Family get-togethers, holiday shopping, holiday cooking and more are all filling your calendar in Thanksgiving and December. With a bit of planning and preparation, these helpful hints should allow you to enjoy the holiday and keep from having to finish a key assignment or study for a final at the last minute:

Schedule your holidays.
Just like timing the components of a holiday meal, designate days and hours for studying/coursework, holiday commitments, and family time. For example, complete a homework assignment before you head out for Black Friday shopping, so you can enjoy the madness along with other deal seekers. Choose which holiday parties you will attend based upon school deadlines, so that you have enough time to study and have fun, says Richard Shadick, director of the counseling center and an associate adjunct professor of psychology at Pace University in New York.

Set realistic goals.
This may be the year that you hand off certain Thanksgiving dishes or holiday parties to someone else. Adult students often feel like they are unable to give anything their “all,” but if you set reasonable expectations about school, home and work, you will feel less stressed, Shadick says.

Don’t overindulge.
Enjoy that (one) cup of eggnog, as Shadick points out that drinking too much, overeating, or staying up later than normal makes it difficult to study effectively.

Be thankful for help.
If you feel overloaded, consider going to your school’s counseling center to talk to a professional about your holiday and school-related stress.

For more tips, click here

News 12: Psychology professors offer insights into communicating with teens

Pace University psychology professors Jennifer Powell-Lunder and Ross Robak were interviewed for a News 12 segment after they spoke at the Teen Speak event in Pleasantville on November 3 on communicating with teens. (Left: Powell-Lunder).

Pace University psychology professors Jennifer Powell-Lunder and Ross Robak were interviewed for a News 12 segment after they spoke at the Teen Speak event in Pleasantville on November 3 on communicating with teens.

Read the press release here.

The New York Times: James Hillman, Therapist in Men’s Movement, Dies at 85

Chair of Pace’s psychology department in New York City, Wade Pickren, PhD, recalls the impact that the late famed psychologist James Hillman had on therapy and the “men’s movement.”

From The New York Times:

James Hillman, a charismatic therapist and best-selling author whose theories about the psyche helped revive interest in the ideas of Carl Jung, animating the so-called men’s movement in the 1990s and stirring the pop-cultural air, died on Thursday at his home in Thompson, Conn. He was 85.

“He was in the tradition — or maybe the nontradition — of Alan Watts: a psychologist, thinker and lay philosopher who took concepts from a variety of sources and melded them into his own, particular idiosyncratic take,” said Wade E. Pickren, chairman of psychology at Pace University in New York and editor of the journal History of Psychology.

“I think psychology is prone to and also needs people like Hillman who think outside the box,” Professor Pickren said. “Sometimes he’s following his own idiosyncrasies, but sometimes his observations make us all pause and reconsider.”

via James Hillman, Therapist in Men’s Movement, Dies at 85 – NYTimes.com.

EverydayHealth.com: “Why Are So Many Gay Teens Depressed?”

Too often, hostile environments at school and at home make gay and lesbian adolescents depressed. Dr. Richard Shadick, director of Pace’s NYC Campus Counseling Center, suggests how teens in the LGBT adolescent scene can find the emotional support they need.

A recent National School Climate Survey of 7,000 lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) students, ranging in age from 13 to 21, found that 80 percent had been verbally harassed, 40 percent physically harassed, 60 percent felt unsafe at school, and one in three had missed a day of school in the last month due to fear of violence.

Given these struggles, it’s no surprise that a LGBT teen may experience depression.

“Family members and friends can provide needed support for a loved one who might be depressed,” advised Richard Shadick, PhD, director of the Counseling Center and an adjunct professor of psychology at Pace University in New York City, in an interview with EverydayHealth.com.  “Warning signs include a change in how a gay teen relates (they become withdrawn and isolated), how they look (they may become unkempt, sad, or dispirited), or how they act (they may give away prize possessions, talk of wanting to die, and/or engage in impulsive and dangerous behavior).  They may also drink or use drugs heavily.  And if a teen has a family member that has died because of suicide or they have tried to kill themselves before, then there should be extra concern,” said Shadick.

Click here to read more of the article – “Why Are So Many Gay Teen Depressed?” – which appears on EverydayHealth.com, a leading provider of online health solutions with more than 28 million monthly unique visitors.

The Associated Press: “College mental health screenings go high-tech”

Many college counseling centers are more swamped than ever, therapists say, particularly at this time of year, in the frenzy of final exams and job searches.

Dr. Richard Shadick, Director of Pace University’s Counseling Center in New York City and an adjunct professor of psychology, was interviewed about trends in screening college students for mental health issues – what works, what hasn’t.

Within the counseling field, there is no consensus about whether there really are more college students with mental health issues or whether they are simply increasingly willing to ask for help.

Some say that antidepressants and more support has made it more possible than ever for a student who is mentally ill to attend college. Others have noted that this generation of students seems less able to cope with stress, for whatever reason.

At Pace University in New York, counseling director Richard Shadick and his staff give a presentation at each “University 101” class for freshman and give them a survey to help them get a read on substance abuse and mental health problems they may be having. The mental health staff also spends time on campus giving mini screenings called “checkups from the neck up” and refers students who need help to the counseling center.

Learn more about how mental health is being taken seriously here at Pace and at other college campuses.

NEWS RELEASE: Nineteenth Annual Psychology Conference at Pace’s NYC Campus

The Pace Psychology Conference is a free event, open to the public. The full-day program will provide insight and conversation on many key contemporary issues relevant to the psychology community locally, regionally, nationally, and internationally as well as to many levels of students, high school and college, interested in learning about psychology and conducting research as well as adults contemplating a career change. Invited guests and panel experts will join students and faculty from Pace University as well as from tri-state area colleges and universities such as Adelphi University, CUNY, Fairleigh Dickinson University, Fordham University, New York University, and SUNY at New Paltz.

Pace University’s Psychology Department will host the 19th Annual Psychology Conference on May 14 at Pace University’s lower Manhattan campus. Students from Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences as well as students from nearby universities will share oral and poster presentations based on theory and research in their chosen fields of interest. The 19th Pace Psychology Conference will highlight research issues from technology’s effect on adult anxiety levels to the correlation between gender roles and alcohol consumption on college campuses.

The Pace Psychology Conference is a free event, open to the public. The full-day program will provide insight and conversation on many key contemporary issues relevant to the psychology community locally, regionally, nationally, and internationally as well as to many levels of students, high school and college, interested in learning about psychology and conducting research as well as adults contemplating a career change. Invited guests and panel experts will join students and faculty from Pace University as well as from tri-state area colleges and universities such as Adelphi University, CUNY, Fairleigh Dickinson University, Fordham University, New York University, and SUNY at New Paltz.

Pace Distinguished Professor Florence Denmark, PhD will introduce keynote speaker Jean Lau Chin, Ed D.  Dr. Chin’s title of her address, Diversity and Leadership, is based on her current research with the Derner Institute of Advanced Psychological Studies at Adelphi University. She has authored and co-authored numerous peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters in professional publications on women’s issues, cultural competence, Asian American, and ethnic minority issues.  She recently completed a four-volume set, The Psychology of Prejudice and Discrimination, which covers racism, ethnicity, gender, and all forms of discrimination, and Learning From My Mother’s Voice: Family Legend and Chinese American Experience, a book on family bonds using oral history and mythology as a healing tool and transformational journey for immigrant families.  She also serves as the series editor of Race and Ethnicity in Psychology (Praeger Press).

The afternoon program will include a symposium on What Are New Developments in International Psychology Today – in Practice, Research, and Teaching?

Other conference events include a luncheon with international psychologists representing the United Nations Psychologists and members of the American Psychological Association Division 52- International Psychology.  The Psi Chi, International Honor Society of Psychology will hold an induction ceremony welcoming their new 2011 members and hold a “best practices” focus groups for all attending members. The conference will be held at One Pace Plaza in Student Union and Multipurpose Room.

This event is presented in partnership with Dyson College of the Arts and Sciences, Pace University’s Chapter of Psi Chi, the International Division (Division 52) of the American Psychological Association, and New York State Psychological Association’s Academic Division, Social Issues Division, and Division of Women’s Issues, the Manhattan Psychological Association (MPA), the Psychology Section of the New York Academy of Sciences, and the International Organization of the Study of Group Tension (IOSGT).

Information on the conference including registration, schedule and speakers can be found at www.pacepsycon.com or send an email to mmccormick2@pace.edu. For more information on Psi Chi please visit www.psichi.org

Psychology Department on Pace University’s New York City Campus

Pace offers two undergraduate degrees, a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Bachelor of Arts in Applied Psychology and Human Relations; and three graduate degrees, MS Ed in School Psychology, MA in Psychology, and PsyD in School-Clinical Child Psychology. Pace’s PsyD degree is approved by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) and accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA). The doctoral program is one of only 10 recognized nationwide as a combined professional-scientific doctoral program by the APA.

About Pace University

For 105 years, Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Contact: Cara Cea, ccea@pace.edu; 914-906-9680

NEWS RELEASE: Psychology Professor Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder, PsyD, Talks “Teen” in New Book “Teenage as a Second Language”

Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder has a doctorate in school/clinical child psychology from Pace University. She is the Director of an inpatient adolescent unit at Four Winds Hospital in Katonah, New York. She is an adjunct professor at Pace University and maintains a private practice in New York. She is also the co-creator of www.TalkingTeenage.com an interactive website for parents of teens.

Posted in partnership with Adams Media:

TEENAGE AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

A Parent’s Guide to Becoming Bilingual

Barbara R. Greenberg, PhD

And Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder, PsyD

What’s the story?

You wake up one day and your cheerful, friendly kid has morphed into a sarcastic, sullen adolescent who can’t—or won’t—talk to you.  Now what? Forget Spanish, its time to learn a second language and that language is teen.

Enter TEENAGE AS A SECOND LANGUAGE:  A Parent’s Guide to Becoming Bilingual (Adams Media, a division of F+W Media; November) by Barbara R. Greenberg, PhD and Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder, PsyD—the only book on the market to reveal concrete strategies any parent can use to maintain good communication, healthy interaction, and strong connections to their teens.

What does it mean for your audience?

Based on the latest research, this book works as a Rosetta Stone to help parents hear what their teens are really saying—one dialogue at a time.  Readers will learn how to:

  • Let their teens help set the rules—and the consequences for breaking them
  • Put honesty above all else
  • Realize that “me, me, me!” is actually age-appropriate behavior
  • Try not to criticize, judge, or become angry

Who are the authors?

Barbara R. Greenberg has a doctorate in clinical psychology from SUNY at Stony Brook. She maintains a full-time private practice in Connecticut where she serves as the Adolescent Consultant for Silver Hill Hospital in New Canaan, Connecticut. She is also the co-creator of www.TalkingTeenage.com an interactive website for parents of teens.

Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder has a doctorate in school/clinical child psychology from Pace University. She is the Director of an inpatient adolescent unit at Four Winds Hospital in Katonah, New York. She is an adjunct professor at Pace University and maintains a private practice in New York. She is also the co-creator of www.TalkingTeenage.com an interactive website for parents of teens.

For more information, please contact Beth Gissinger at 508/427-6757 or beth.gissinger@fwmedia.com

www.adamsmedia.com

www.talkingteenage.com