The New York Times (front page): “Weiner’s Exit Sets Off a Race to Be Israel’s Better Friend”

Pace made the front page of Tuesday’s New York Times, where Chris Malone, prominently identified as an associate professor of political science at Pace, was quoted saying the forthcoming race to replace Congressman Anthony Wiener “will be a one-upsmanship on who is more pro-Israel.” At the end of the article, Malone also provided a second mention of Pace and the closing “kicker”: “Dr. Malone, the Pace political scientist, predicted that other issues would indeed emerge in the campaign, but said the importance of the Jewish vote would remain.

“There’s bigger fish to fry,” he said, “as long as they’re fried kosher.”

Dr. Christopher Malone

Pace made the front page of Tuesday’s New York Times, where Chris Malone, prominently identified as an associate professor of political science at Pace, was quoted saying the forthcoming race to replace Congressman Anthony Wiener “will be a one-upsmanship on who is more pro-Israel.”

At the end of the article, Malone also provided a second mention of Pace and the closing “kicker”: “Dr. Malone, the Pace political scientist, predicted that other issues would indeed emerge in the campaign, but said the importance of the Jewish vote would remain.

“There’s bigger fish to fry,” he said, “as long as they’re fried kosher.”

Read the full article.

A similar story with Malone ran on NY1 TV.

Check out Pace’s Political Science program.

USA Today: Political Science Professor Chris Malone Comments on Anthony Weiner Resignation

Professor Chris Malone is quoted in an article in USA Today on New York Rep. Anthony Weiner who resigned his House seat after a three-week Internet sex scandal.

Professor Chris Malone is quoted in an article in USA Today on New York Rep. Anthony Weiner who resigned his House seat after a three-week Internet sex scandal. 

From USA Today: “Weiner’s district, which spans neighborhoods in Brooklyn and Queens, is traditionally Democratic, but it was in jeopardy as New York lawmakers worked to redraw congressional districts. The state is slated to lose two seats as a result of the 2010 Census.

 “There was already talk of redistricting Anthony Weiner out of Congress before he resigned,” said Christopher Malone, an associate professor of political science at Pace University, who is active in New York Democratic politics.”

The New York Times: “True Blue in District Nine”

Christopher Malone, an associate professor of political science at Pace University and the director of the Pforzheimer Honors College on the New York City campus, writes an opinion article for The New York Times. Malone shares his opinion on Anthony Weiner, and politics.

Christopher Malone, an associate professor of political science at Pace University and the director of the Pforzheimer Honors College on the New York City campus, writes an opinion article for The New York Times. Malone shares his opinion on Anthony Weiner, and what the New York congressman’s sins could mean for his party. From the article:

Ultimately, though, Weinergate is just the latest example of the blurring of the lines between the public official and the private individual. I’m not sure this is a good thing. It makes us all dumber. I’d be willing to bet that most Americans can now tell you all about what Weiner did without being able to say one word about his legislative record as a US Congressman. And that is a shame.

Read the full opinion article in The New York Times.

NYC High School Students Learn Value of Political Participation From Prof. Malone and Pace Students

About 120 New York City high school students are blogging in organized ways about the city’s forthcoming mayoral election.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

120 HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS BLOGGING ABOUT NYC POLITICAL RACES DURING INNOVATIVE, YEAR-LONG POLITICAL LITERACY PROJECT

PACE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS AND PROFESSOR ACTING AS MENTORS

NEW YORK, NY, October 20, 2009 – About 120 New York City high school students are blogging in organized ways about the city’s forthcoming mayoral election.

Bill Thompson’s ad strategy? “At first, the fact that he was from Brooklyn was an interesting fact about him, but he seems to use it too much to gain support of people from the lower classes.”

Michael Bloomberg’s? “He states that he rides the subway and walks down the street which makes it seem like he is walking in our shoes. Bloomberg is saying that he is just like us.”

Politics buffs and others interested in tuning in on what the students think can visit http://vote18plp.ning.com/.

The students are being encouraged by their classroom teachers at Pace High School, a new “small” public school with which Pace is a partner, and in the Upward Bound program housed at Pace University. The students and their classmates get significant mentoring from three Pace undergraduates and their professor, Pace political scientist Christopher Malone, an innovator in ways to stoke civic interest in young people.

The project is using materials developed by Vote 18, a nonpartisan, nonprofit group that over the last four years has organized civics lessons around short, simulated elections in high schools from New York State’s Hamptons to El Paso and Los Angeles. Curriculum materials and stipends for the Pace student mentors are funded by a grant to Pace from the Verizon Foundation’s Thinkfinity program, which develops technological resources in education.

Issues and ad wars

The high school students taking part in the “Political Literacy Project” come from a cross-section of city neighborhoods. One group attends Pace High School in Chinatown; the other is part of Upward Bound, a federally funded program that serves high school students from low-income families and families in which neither parent holds a bachelor’s degree. The goal of Upward Bound is to increase the rates at which participants finish secondary education and enroll in and graduate from postsecondary institutions.

The Political Literacy Project is unfolding in several phases. It kicked off in September with a civics lesson on the importance of voting taught by Vote 18’s Executive Director and Co-Founder Marco Ceglie. In the weeks before the mayor’s vote, the 120 students who have been designated “Political Literacy Reporters” are analyzing the mayoral election in their blog posts from four different perspectives: the issues, the ad wars, media coverage of the campaign, and candidates’ attacks on each other. The goal is to give the reporters a solid grounding in all aspects of a political campaign.

In November, the Political Literacy Reporters will shift their attention to every kind of elected office in New York City. They will report on officeholders ranging from city council members, district attorneys, U.S. senators, members of Congress and the governor to state assembly members and borough presidents. The students get weekly questions to blog about, growing out of their experiences, issues and class discussions.

Nationwide duplication?

By the time the project concludes in May, the 2010 New York State governor’s race will be in full swing, which is where the students will end their year-long civic engagement.

“One argument about nonparticipation among youth is that they don’t know the first thing about the political process, and so they tune out,” said Malone. “The Political Literacy Project gives these young people a sustained experience in political participation so they’ll have the tools they need to become effective citizens when they turn 18. I believe this curriculum could be duplicated nationwide and help our youngest citizens become literate about politics.”

As one student wrote, “I think it’s cool how in today’s world politicians are getting ‘hip’ to technology.”

Clearly the students are, too.

About Pace University

For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Visit us on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook – Pace University News | Twitter @PaceUNews| Flickr | YouTube. Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Pace expert praises overdue due diligence in Galleon investigation

John Alan James is an adjunct management professor at Pace and is an expert on corporate governance and regulatory issues. He is available for comment on the spreading Galleon Group insider-trading scandal.

October 20, 2009

Contact: Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

NEWS SOURCE

Topic: The spreading Galleon Group insider-trading scandal: At last, due diligence

“In the Galleon debacle, in contrast to Madoff, Stanford, Satyam, et.al., finally someone with responsibility did their due diligence. The reporting to the Securities and Exchange Commission by the New York Stock Exchange of ‘unusual’ intra-day trading in both Hilton Hotels and Google shares resulted in the SEC taking actions so lacking in the other cases.

“We can pass the most comprehensive regulations and staff compliance agencies up to the gills with experts, but, unless Boards of Directors instill and oversee ‘internal governance,’ scoundrels will find loopholes.”

So says John Alan James, the expert on corporate governance and regulatory issues who created the first texts in English on laws governing companies in key European countries. He is an adjunct management professor at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in New York City. At Lubin three years ago he was the first to introduce into an MBA curriculum anywhere in the world a course covering corporate governance systems in the leading world economies.

James is available to comment on the spreading Galleon Group insider-trading scandal. He recently appeared on Bloomberg Radio and Television to discuss the Madoff scandal and among other media appearances was quoted on CFO.com about the Satyam scandal.

Email jjames@pace.edu; phone: (203) 979-3611 (cell).

BACKGROUND: As a professional management consultant, James and his Brussels-based staff created, edited and published the first texts in English on company law, corporate governance and industrial relations law in the 12 key countries of Western Europe. He has served as an advisor to the top managements of multinational companies with headquarters in the US, Europe, Japan, Asia and Latin America.

He was an early contributor to the multinational business and economic seminars at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. He co-chaired the first global conference on Multinational Companies and Multinational Unions at the U.N. International Labour Organization center in Geneva, Switzerland.

James received his bachelor’s in political science from Northwestern University and graduate degrees in business economics at the Booth Graduate School of Business of the University of Chicago. He has lectured at the World Economic Forum in Davos; INSEAD at Fontainbleau, France; CEI/IMEDE in Switzerland, the Northwestern and Harvard European Executive Programs; the IBM Management Development Centre in Brussels; the United Nations Management Training Centre in Torino, Italy; the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania; the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University; and the Cornell University School of Industrial Relations.

The Lubin School of Business recently has earned a preeminent position in thought leadership on the issues surrounding the world’s move to International Financial Reporting Standards, and has hosted three major conferences on the subject which have received extensive industry coverage, including two special sections of the CPA Journal. The school is accredited for both business and accounting by AACSB International, an elite distinction shared by fewer than three percent of business schools worldwide. It is one of the largest four-year, private undergraduate and graduate business programs in the nation. Its dean, Joseph Baczko, is a former COO of Blockbuster.

With a tradition of practice-oriented curricula, Lubin has achieved national recognition for both its graduate and undergraduate programs in U.S.News & World Report and other media. Approximately 4,000 students are enrolled in Lubin’s undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in Downtown and Midtown New York City, and Pleasantville and White Plains in Westchester County. Prominent alumni include Melvin Karmazin, CEO of Sirius Satellite Radio; James Quinn, president of Tiffany & Co.; Ivan Seidenberg, chairman and CEO of Verizon; Marie Toulantis, former-CEO of Barnes&Noble.com; and Richard Zannino, former-CEO of Dow Jones & Company. www.pace.edu/lubin.

About Pace. For 103 years Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, it has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Pace Connects with Hip-Hop New Hampshire Primary Coverage

Pace University political scientist Christopher Malone, Pace adjunct professor of political science George Martinez, and several Pace students will participate Tuesday evening in an innovative hip-hop television program covering the New Hampshire primary. Its producers hope to boost young people’s participation in politics. Malone knows something about that: He recently directed mock Democratic and Republican nominating conventions involving 600 high school students, coached by Pace undergraduates, that received national publicity in The Washington Post.

Contacts:
Professor Christopher Malone, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Pace University
Office: 914-773-3428, Cell: 347-489-1520
Christopher T. Cory, Director of Public Information, Pace University
212-346-1117; cell 917-608-8164

HIP-HOP TV COVERAGE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY
INVOLVES PACE UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS, STUDENTS

New York, January 26, 2004 — Pace University political scientist Christopher Malone, Pace adjunct professor of political science George Martinez, and several Pace students will participate Tuesday evening in an innovative hip-hop television program covering the New Hampshire primary. Its producers hope to boost young people’s participation in politics. Malone knows something about that: He recently directed mock Democratic and Republican nominating conventions involving 600 high school students, coached by Pace undergraduates, that received national publicity in The Washington Post.

Tuesday’s TV program is being produced by an alliance including the National Hip Hop Association. The Association’s most recent advisory follows.

YOU ARE INVITED TO WATCH OR COME ON JAN 27TH, TUES. 8PM-10PM,
FOR THE NATIONAL HIP-HOP ASSOCIATION’S LIVE PILOT TV SHOW COVERING THE NEW HAMPSHIRE PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARIES

Watch the live show on the internet from 8pm-10pm EST at www.mnn.org <http://www.mnn.org/> by clicking on channel 34. For Deep Dish customers, watch channel 9415; for Manhattan residents, watch channel 34 (TW) or 107 (RCN).
Come to the live taping at MNN’s studios on 537 W. 59th St. between 10th and 11th Avenue, Columbus Circle subway stop (1/9/A/C/D/B).
================================================
<< THE NATIONAL HIP-HOP ASSOCIATION ANNOUNCES >>
================================================
WHAT: The National Hip-Hop Association, Free Speech TV, and MNN present “PRIMARY DAY – WHAT MATTERS?”, LIVE from Manchester, New Hampshire and New York City. In a guerilla style effort with a youth perspective and focus on Hip-Hop activists and grassroots organizing, the non-profit organizations have collaborated on a 2-hour live program ‘Primary Day — What Matters?’ that will take place on Tuesday, January 27, 2004 from 8pm-10pm on Free Speech TV, produced live out of Manhattan Neighborhood Network’s studios.

WHEN: Tuesday, January 27 @ 8pm EST

WHERE: LIVE streaming at www.freespeech.org – watch from anywhere in the world!
On DISH Network Channel 9415
On Manhattan Neighborhood Network Channel 34 (TW) or 107(RCN) in Manhattan

On the night of the New Hampshire Primary, FSTV the Manhattan Neighborhood Network and the National Hip Hop Association present, “PRIMARY DAY – WHAT MATTERS?” This historic live broadcast will bring you exclusive alternative live coverage of the Presidential Primary. Alternating between studio discussion and cultural performances in New York and Primary coverage in NH — using FSTV’s mobile production studio, the “Cyberbus” — we will report on primary results as they come in AND address deeper, systemic issues facing Americans in this election-cycle.

Our hosts Deepa Fernandes, George Martinez and Shannon Service will engage young activists, hip-hop artists, political organizers, and experts on the following topics: education, civil liberties, immigrant rights, prison moratorium, and internet activism. According to Martinez, “‘Primary Day – What Matters?’ will transform the New Hampshire primary into an exciting, innovative, new form of live television programming that combines insightful political commentary, the power of hip-hop and the cultural arts, with interactive media technology.”
———————-
SPECIAL GUESTS INCLUDE
———————-
Baye Wilson of the National Hip Hop Political Convention, call-in from Davey D, NianaKhanna of the League of Independent Voters, and members of the Boston based hip-hop collective, “Critical Breakdown” on mobilizing youth activists through culture and technology.

Abi Odun of the Last Poets, Panama Alba, co-founder of the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights, Nabil Migalli of the New Hampshire Arab-American Forum, and Desis Rising Up and Moving on immigrant rights, civil liberties and the PATRIOT act.

Chino Harden of the Prison Moratorium Project, excerpts from Danny Hoch’s “Prisons, Hospitals and Hip-Hop,” and Fatema Gunja of the Drug Policy Forum of Massachusetts on opposing the expansion of the prison industrial complex.

Toni Blackman—US Ambassador of Hip-Hop, Presidential Expert Professor Chris Malone from Pace University, Alex King of Circle of Girls, and Ruth Henry of Reflect and Strengthen on under funding in public schools and H2Ed.net on the role of Hip-Hop in education.

——————————————–
MORE DETAILS ON THIS EXCITING COLLABORATION
——————————————–
Free Speech TV
http://www.freespeech.org/fsitv/html/primaryday.shtml
Manhattan Neighborhood Network
http://mnn.org/whatmatters.html
National Hip-Hop Association
Www.h2ed.net

Powell Kucinich, Dean, Kerry chosen as nominees by innovative mock convention at Pace

Dennis Kucinich has emerged as the Democratic nominee for President. In convention balloting, Howard Dean was second, John Kerry third.

Contacts:
Christopher T. Cory, Director of Public Information, Pace University
212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu
Stephanie Tackach, Convention Press Secretary, cell 908-230-8091 stephanietackach@yahoo.com
Christopher Malone, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Pace University
914-773-3428, cell 347-489-1520 cmalone@pace.edu

CHENEY DECLINES VICE PRESIDENTIAL NOMINATION.
STUDENTS NOMINATE COLIN POWELL INSTEAD.

KUCINICH PICKED AS DEMOCRATIC NOMINEE.
DEAN, KERRY ARE RUNNERS-UP.

New York, NY, January 9 2004 – Dennis Kucinich has emerged as the Democratic nominee for President. In convention balloting, Howard Dean was second, John Kerry third.

Moreover, Dick Cheney has refused to accept the Republican Vice Presidential nomination. No reasons were given. In his place, Republican convention delegates nominated Colin Powell. It took two ballots to select a replacement with four candidates in contention, Powell, Rudy Guiliani, Condoleezza Rice and John McCain. The final runoff was between Powell and Giuilani.

Ten days before the Iowa caucuses, these results reflect votes of approximately 600 high school students from 25 public schools comprising a cross section of New York City and suburban Westchester County. Since Wednesday night, the students have been at Pace University’s downtown New York campus, role-playing delegates to mock Republican and Democratic conventions. The simulation was complete with 10-foot-high signs for each state delegation and a shower of balloons at the convention climax this afternoon. The high school students were coached by some 60 Pace University undergraduates taking an innovative course taught by Pace political scientist Christopher Malone, Ph.D.

New York City Schools Chancellor Joel Klein addressed Friday’s closing ceremony.

Planks. The student delegates also debated and adopted platform planks, some of which may have life in the future. For one thing, all are being sent to the respective Democratic and Republican national committees:

In addition, at the suggestion of Pace President David A. Caputo, the best are being compiled into a national, nonpartisan “Youth Platform” that will be presented for discussion to students at Pace and other campuses and then to candidates.

The Republican planks that were passed today favor items including:
· A “divorce tax” to encourage working on marriages and discourage the increasing the divorce rate.
· Support of school vouchers
· A “brand new” social security program involving investment in stocks, lock boxes, and privatization

Democratic planks call for:
· A more comprehensive environmental protection program than ever before.
· Repeal of the Bush tax cut and reapportioning $20 million of the $87 billion costs of the Iraq war to each of three social programs.
· Education reform, increasing funding to failing schools to improve them and level the playing field of the educational process.

Registration cards. In Malone’s fall class at Pace, students ventured out to 25 high schools in the metropolitan area to educate and prepare students for their roles during the mock conventions.

The high school students came together Wednesday night in the Pace campus’s gymnasium to be sworn in as delegates by Caputo, a political scientist who is concerned with expanding youth engagements in political affairs. “Tonight began the process of picking the next President of the United States,” he declared.

Jon Romano, a senior at Pace University, challenged the delegates to “step up, accept the challenge and vote.” All are taking home voter registration cards.

The next day students filled classrooms for presentations on platform issues by experts including Kay Maxwell, President of the U.S. League of Women Voters; Catherine Lederer Plaskett, President of the Westchester Coalition for Legal Abortion, and Christopher Slattery, the pro-life President of Expectant Mother Care.

Said Stephanie Tackach, a Pace first-year student who served as press secretary for the conventions, “Compared to three days ago, these high school students seem a lot more eager to have their voices heard.”