Peekskill-Cortlandt Patch: “Please Fill Out This Application: Give us References and Your Facebook Username & Password”

With social media exploding in popularity more and more employers are looking at prospective employee’s Facebook pages. But, how far can they and should they go?

Lisa J. Stamatelos (pictured) is an adjunct professor of human resources management at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business.  The following is from her “Workplace – Wild and Wonderful” column which appears in the Peekskill-Cortlandt Patch. 

Face it, your employer or potential employer may want to check out your Facebook page.

This past week I heard on the news that some employers are not only looking at what they are able to see on a person’s Facebook page, but are outright asking individuals to logon to their Facebook account so they can look at it. Whoa, can they do that? The fact is, right now, they can. Is it violating federal law? TechCrunch reported that this past Wednesday the House of Representatives voted down a proposed amendment to FCC legislation that would have prevented current or potential employers from seeking access to employee Facebook accounts. It is possible that new legislation addressing this issue will be introduced.  Further, Democratic Senators Richard Blumenthal (CT) and Chuck Schumer (NY) are planning to introduce an equivalent bill in the Senate. In the meantime, what should you do if it happens to you now? 

I put the question to the students in my Human Resources class at Pace University in Pleasantville. As I looked out at the class I saw shock on most of their faces. Some insisted that an employer can’t do that. One young lady felt that asking for the information was akin to asking for the key to her diary  Another student said he would refuse and would not care if he did not get the job. I then asked, “What if you really need and/or want the job?” Would you give in? I saw the wheels turning. Don’t you just hate it when your professor asks you to think? Some changed their minds and indicated that they would comply. Others stood their ground.           

Even if an employer does not ask you outright to look at your Facebook page they can still peruse what is available to them. Obviously, the first thing to do is to make sure you do not have anything on any of your social media accounts that you do not want an employer to see. Next, use the privacy settings only allowing those you want to give permission to view your page. Keep in mind, there are “go arounds.” For example, I have heard that some companies will make up fictitious names and attempt to “friend” an applicant. I have also been told that if your page is blocked an employer might try to view one of your friends’ pages and gain access to information about you that way.      

Personally, I see demanding this information as an invasion of privacy. I would not ask this of an applicant. However, I would investigate if something alarming was brought to my attention. Pay attention to what you are posting. As Sergeant Phil Esterhaus of Hill Street Blues used to say, “Hey, let’s be careful out there.”

About this column: Lisa J. Stamatelos is the President of LJS HR Services. Stamatelos is a Human Resources Professional with over 20 years of management experience working with rapidly growing and changing companies. Her expertise includes employment law, recruiting, employee and labor relations as well as training and development. Stamatelos received her Bachelor of Business Administration (summa cum laude) and Master of Business Administration from Pace University. You can reach her at lisa@ljshrservices.com and visit her website, www.ljshrservices.com twitter.com/HRAficionada

 

Crain’s New York Business: Executive Moves, April 2, 2012

Lubin Professor Bruce Bachenheimer’s appointment as Director of Pace’s new entrepreneurship lab continues to make news.

Crain’s New York Business included Professor Bachenheimer’s appointment in this week’s Executive Moves column, along with his photo: 

Pace University:
Bruce Bachenheimer, 50, was promoted to director of the university’s entrepreneurship lab. He will continue as clinical professor of management. He was previously program director of entrepreneurship at the Lubin School of Business.

Military Advanced Education: “Pace to Encourage Entrepreneurship”

Military Advanced Education, the Journal of Higher Learning for Today’s Servicemember, reports on the opening of Pace’s new Entrepreneurship Lab in the April issue.

Military Advanced Education saluted Pace’s launch of an Entrepreneurship (E-Lab) which is expected to both nuture the entrepreneurial spirit on campus and serve as a beacon for innovation in the Lower Manhattan community. In addition to the site in Manhattan, the publication noted that Pace opened an Entrepreneurship Lab at the Goldstein Academic Building on its Pleasantville, NY, campus.

Military Advanced Education quoted Neil S. Braun, dean of the Lubin School of Business, on the meaning of entrepreneurship:

“Entrepreneurship, in its broadest sense, is a personal approach for developing ideas into plans and plans into reality. It is interdisciplinary ‘doing.’  Entrepreneurial leadership is as important in large companies as it is in startups; it’s a mindset toward relentless problem solving that leads to successful execution” said Braun, who in his career has assumed many different type of roles, including internet entrepreneur, television network president, corporate attorney, CEO and film producer. “It is therefore at the heart of business education; it is the ultimate capstone for applying the knowledge and skills of the discrete disciplines to a product or service for a specific market opportunity.”

Professor Bruce Bachenheimer, the E-Labs leader, discussed the importance of an entrepreneurial mindset:

“The Entrepreneurship Lab aims to foster an entrepreneurial mindset – a way of thinking and acting that focuses on developing new ways to solve problems and create value,” said Bachenheimer, who drafted the initial proposal of the E- Lab. “These skills are important not only for those seeking to establish a new venture, but are increasingly critical in a wide variety of professional careers given today’s hyper-competitive marketplace, where rapid technological innovation and globalization has led to corporate downsizing and a dramatic change in the very nature of work.”

Westchester County Business Journal: “Bachenheimer now runs E-Lab”

Pace University’s new Entrepreneurship Lab, known as the E-Lab, is available to all Pace students, in New York City and in Pleasantville.

Pace University’s new Entrepreneurship Lab, known as the E-Lab, now has a CEO –  it’s professor Bruce Bachenheimer of Chappaqua. A clinical professor of management at Pace, Bachenheimer is now also the director of the E-Lab. It is available to all Pace students, in New York City and in Pleasantville.

Bachenheimer will advise all aspiring student entrepreneurs, in everything from accounting and computer science to law and the performing arts, noted the Westchester County Business Journal.

He came up with the idea for the annual Pace Pitch Contest and Business Plan Competition, which he introduced in 2004, just after joining the Lubin School of Business faculty.

“The Entrepreneurship Lab aims to foster an entrepreneurial mindset – a way of thinking and acting that focuses on developing new ways to solve problems and create value,” said Bachenheimer. “These skills are important not only for those seeking to establish a new venture, but are increasingly critical in a wide variety of professional careers given today’s hyper-competitive marketplace, where rapid technological innovation and globalization has led to corporate downsizing and a dramatic change in the very nature of work.”

Bachenheimer began his career as a Wall Street trader, and then took several years off to sail through the Caribbean to South America. After that, he launched an importing business and then moved into high-tech forensic science before joining Pace.

Bloomberg Businessweek: “Executives Teaching in B-School”

Some academic theories might be best understood by the people who put those theories into practice.

Practitioners who teach have their failures as well as their successes on display for students. They also serve as a sounding board for students seeking practical career advice.

Business schools have come to value the practitioner’s perspective, and they are increasingly making room for those viewpoints on their staffs. Bloomberg Businessweek identified 25 top executives who teach/guest lecture, including Neil Braun, Dean of the Lubin School of Business.

Neil Braun: Viacom Entertainment

Who: Chief executive officer, Viacom Entertainment (VIA), 1988-94; president, NBC Television Network, 1994-98
Where: Pace University’s Lubin School of Business
What: Dean, guest lecturer

Braun joined a growing list of former executives tapped to run business schools when he was named dean of Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in June 2010. Braun also flits in and out of the classroom as a guest lecturer. He says he has his most rapt audience any time the discussion topic is M&A negotiations. During his time at Viacom, the company bought Blockbuster and Paramount Pictures. “Students hang on every word when you can tell them what was really going on,” he says of those deals in Bloomberg Businessweek.

BPC/BizPlanCompetitions.com: “Pitch contests gain popularity”

For years, business plan competitions were the only option for would-be entrepreneurs seeking prizes, funding and the chance to get in front of venture capitalists via a competition framework. But now, more and more competitions are adding elevator pitch — or simply pitch — contests as an option within an overall business plan competition.

Many of the major Ivy League competitions — including Harvard, Yale and MIT — feature pitch competitions. The advantage of a pitch competition is that it’s much easier to enter, organize, participate and judge than a typical business plan competition, which typically encompasses an entire academic year, according to Bruce Bachenheimer, a professor of management who runs both the Pace University Pitch and Business Plan Competitions.

“Basically, competitors have three minutes in front of a panel of judges to sell their idea,” he told BPC/BizPlanCompetitions.com, a website which bills itself as the “world’s most complete listing of entrepreneurship contests and business plan competitions.”  He added that “there’s an audience for our competition, who can suggest questions, and who also get an education in entrepreneurship. Last year, Pace gave $50,000 in prizes to the competition winners.  The pitch competition has become very popular among business students.”

Pitch contests require different skills than business plan competitions.  In a pitch contest, you don’t necessarily need to have the fully-fleshed out idea that you need to succeed in a business plan competition. Instead, as Bachenheimer puts it, competitors need to “have excellent presentation skills, be quick on their feet, be able to provide a quick summary and be responsive to the very pointed questions of a panel of very distinguished judges.”

He’s very pleased with the way the pitch competition, which is now in it’s eighth year, has evolved. “In the beginning, some of the ideas were kind of crazy, but it’s gotten very serious,” he continues. “It’s very educational and very entertaining for the presenters and the audience. It’s a fast-paced, fun learning opportunity for everyone, including the audience.”

One big advantage of pitch contests is that they are relatively painless to enter. Instead of writing up a complicated, in-depth business plan that participants may have to revise numerous times over the months, a simple 500 word or so entry form, a brief biography and a 10-question form are the sole requirements for the Pace Pitch Contest. Not only is it simpler for the contestants, it is also much easier for the judges and organizers, he says.

And that makes it a good selling point for judges, who have to make a big time commitment to judge a business plan competition. Those can take months and judges must read multiple business plans, evaluate them at various stages and mentor competitions. With the pitch competition, it’s a one-day commitment. It’s also much easier on organizers, which is why it’s easier to start and run a pitch competition than a full business plan competition, Bachenheimer continues.

NEWS RELEASE: Pace Football to Recognize Two Wounded Warriors During Sept 10th Game Against Stonehill College

Two of our nation’s wounded heroes – Ty Campbell (U.S. Coast Guard) and Keyla Gammarano (U.S. Army) – will be honored during the Pace vs Stonehill football game in Pleasantville, NY on Saturday, September 10 at 1 pm. Over 44,000 service members have been physically wounded during the current military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Hundreds of thousands more are estimated to be recovering from invisible wounds of war, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depression, and traumatic brain injury (TBI).

CURRENT VETERANS TY CAMPBELL (U.S. COAST GUARD) AND KEYLA GAMMARANO (U.S. ARMY) HONORED FOR ENORMOUS SACRIFICES

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. (September 8, 2011) – Pace University will host our nation’s wounded heroes during its football game against Stonehill College  in Pleasantville, NY on Saturday, September 10 at 1 pm.

In partnership with the Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) and the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA), Pace has invited two wounded warriors to serve as honorary captains for the day as well as take part in the pre-game coin toss. 

“It is truly an honor to host two of our finest that have served our country and were wounded overseas,” commented Pace Director of Athletics Mark Brown. “As we reflect on the tenth anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, their service and sacrifice to our country is a testament to the strength of our democracy.”

Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to honor and empower these wounded warriors and make this the most successful, well-adjusted generation of veterans in our nation’s history.  Wounded Warriors Ty Campbell from the U.S. Coast Guard and Keyla Gammarano from the U.S. Army will be honored at the Pace-Stonehill football game.

Ty Campbell served with the U.S. Coast Guard for 11 years. On board the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Escanaba stationed in Boston, MA, he was certified as a Federal Law Enforcement Officer. After a short time within this field, the 9/11 terrorist attacks occurred and he was sent to New York to conduct Anti-Terrorism operations which began his new career path. From there, he was sent to San Diego, CA, to start up the Sea Marshal branch. Eventually, he was transferred to Maritime Safety and Security Team LA/ LB (91103) in San Pedro, CA. There he gained the knowledge and experience in Anti-Terrorism and Counter-Narcotic Operations that helped him become the Team Leader for the Force Protection Team at Maritime Safety and Security Team New York (91106) in the summer of 2006. He conducted numerous Anti-Terrorism operations as well as Counter-Narcotic operations around the world. Up until his injury, he was certified in the following fields: Federal Law Enforcement Officer/ Instructor, Radiation Detection Operator/ Instructor, Combat Medic/EMT, Non-compliant Boarding Officer Team Leader, Vertical Insertion, and Close Quarters Combat.

Keyla Gammarano served with the U.S. Army as a Major Nurse Officer. In 2004, she deployed to Iraq with the 31 CSH, Combat Support Hospital. She also worked in the Iba Sina Hospital in Bagdad, Iraq, which used to be Saddam Hussein’s own private hospital. She was in charge of the detainee/prisoners of war. Major Gammarano’s duties were to ensure that the prisoners were medically taking care of and to protect their safety. She supervised the Military Police assigned to the unit as well as the nursing staff. Her major accomplishment was to reunite wounded children prisoners housed in the unit with their displaced families.

“Wounded warriors are models of service and dedication, and being publicly recognized for their sacrifices at events like this can be a once-in-a-lifetime experience for them,” said Steve Nardizzi, Executive Director of Wounded Warrior Project. “Our hope is that these warriors also inspire the teams and fans around the country as they share their stories of recovery and resiliency.”

Over 44,000 service members have been physically wounded during the current military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Hundreds of thousands more are estimated to be recovering from invisible wounds of war, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depression, and traumatic brain injury (TBI). 

Wounded Warrior Project Public Service Announcements will also be played throughout the game. 

About the Wounded Warrior Project: The mission of the Wounded Warrior Project™ (WWP) is to honor and empower wounded warriors. WWP’s purpose is to raise awareness and to enlist the public’s aid for the needs of injured service members, to help injured servicemen and women aid and assist each other, and to provide unique, direct programs and services to meet their needs. WWP is a national, nonpartisan organization headquartered in Jacksonville, FL. To get involved and learn more, visit www.woundedwarriorproject.org

About the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA): NACDA, now in its 47th year, is the professional and educational association for more than 6,500 college athletics administrators at more than 1,600 institutions throughout the United States, Canada and Mexico. More than 2,300 athletics administrators annually attend the NACDA Convention. Additionally, NACDA administers 11 professional associations that come under the umbrella of the athletics director. For more information, visit www.nacda.com 

About Pace Athletics: Pace University is an NCAA Division II member of the Northeast-10 Conference with 20 varsity sports teams. The Pace Athletics Department had 51% of its athletes in the Spring 2011 semester post a 3.0 GPA or higher to earn Northeast-10 Commissioner’s Honor Roll status. Six student athletes had a perfect 4.0 GPA for the semester as Pace ranked seventh out of 16 institutions in the NE-10. 

About Pace University: For 105 years, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu 

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The Westchester County Business Journal: “A new face for Pace”

The Westchester County Business Journal writes an article featuring Pace and its 100 million dollar master plan to restructure and consolidate the Pleasantville Campus.

William McGrath

The Westchester County Business Journal writes an article featuring Pace and its 100 million dollar master plan to restructure and consolidate the Pleasantville Campus.

Senior Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer William McGrath explains that ‘”We see the long-term benefit of having a beautiful, competitive campus in the center of the county, but it’s very aligned with the county executive’s vision of Westchester County being the intellectual capital of the state… It is something that is good for economic development.”’

The new campus should be ready in the Fall 2015 if everything goes as planned.

Read the full article in the Westchester County Business Journal.

Check out an article in The Examiner on the possible Pace consolidation

MidHudsonNews.com: “Cronin awarded Jefferson Gold Medal”

John Cronin has been a part of the Hudson River environmental movement since 1973 when he started with the Clearwater organization. He reflects how Clearwater founder Pete Seeger recruited him as a volunteer.

John Cronin is a senior fellow at Pace University and executive director of the Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries.

He can also add another title to his resume, a recipient of the Jefferson Award, named for Thomas Jefferson and founded by former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis as a “Noble Prize for public service.”

Cronin was described by the Jefferson Awards Board of Selectors as “Hero for the Planet [and] equal parts detective, scientist and public advocate.” The board said his efforts “have inspired a legacy of programs across the globe, fighting pollution on six continents.”

The MidHudsonNews reports Pace University President Stephen Friedman nominated Cronin for the award, for which Cronin said he was both humbled and honored.

The Journal News: “Ex-Riverkeeper John Cronin receives Jefferson Award”

Former Riverkeeper John Cronin joined a select group this week that included U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and actress Marlo Thomas.

They all received what has been dubbed the “Nobel Prize” for public service — the Jefferson Award.

John Cronin, 60, has worked on environmental issues facing the Hudson River for nearly four decades and was one of 18 people honored with  The Jefferson Award in a ceremony in Washington, DC, Tuesday night.

“It was quite a surprise,” Cronin said Friday to The Journal News. “Some of the awards are known ahead of time, others are kept under wraps. I was just going there to represent Pace University. I still haven’t figured out who knew and who didn’t.”

“The big theme of the two days was that everyday people can change the world,” Cronin said. “It reminded me what a special place the Hudson River Valley is, that we started an environmental movement before there was an Earth Day, when environmentalism wasn’t very popular at all.”

Representing Pace, Cronin was given a Champion award, presented to two “exceptional individuals whose volunteer work reflects the deep and abiding commitment of their employers to making a different in the communities where their employees live and work.”

The award cited his work as an environmental advocate for nearly four decades, serving “on the front lines of water-quality issues as a legislative aide, riverkeeper, and as the co-founder of the Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic, a nationally acclaimed training program for law students and educators.”

Cronin is director and CEO of Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries, and a Senior Fellow for Environmental Affairs, Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies at Pace University.