914INC: “Westchester Corporations’ Charitable Involvement”

Rebecca Tekula, PhD, and Anna-Kay Sinclair of The Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Pace University are interviewed about corporate philanthropy in Westchester—who gives and what they get in return.

Hundreds of companies make a conscious effort to support worthy causes in the county. But what do the companies—and their stockholders—get out of the deal, wondered reporter Dave Donelson in an article appearing in Westchester business lifestyle magazine 914Inc.

It’s not an idle question. Corporate philanthropy is big business in Westchester and it’s growing more important as nonprofit providers of essential social services face budget cuts from state, county, and municipal governments and declines in giving by private individuals.

How big?

According to Anna-Kay Sinclair of The Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Pace University, there were 971 registered private foundations with assets of over $2.8 billion in the county in 2010. That year, six Westchester-based corporate foundations made up 20 percent of total private foundation revenue—more than $78 million of the $391 million total for the county. The major half-dozen were foundations funded by PepsiCo, Pepsi Bottling Group, IBM, Dannon, Heineken, and MBIA based in Armonk.  

Potential sales growth helps explain what The Wilson Center’s executive director, Rebecca Tekula, PhD, observes: “What I see is less idiosyncratic donations based on the personal interests of the corporate leaders and more social responsibility related to the core business.”

In other words, donations are made not because the CEO likes the opera, but because companies believe it helps build the bottom line.

SHRM (Society for Human Resource Management) Online: “Study – More Female Leaders, More Philanthropy”

Rebecca Tekula, Ph.D., executive director of the Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Pace University, debates whether gender plays a role in increased corporate giving.

Companies with more female leaders are more charitable than businesses with few or no female leaders, according to recent research.

This trend is reflected in the report Gender and Corporate Social Responsibility: It’s a Matter of Sustainability, distributed by Catalyst, a nonprofit organization based in New York. Catalyst and Harvard Business School researchers found that companies with female board directors at Fortune 500 companies contributed significantly more charitable funds than companies without women in senior roles.

However, Rebecca Tekula, Ph.D., executive director of the Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Pace University in the New York City metropolitan area, debates whether gender plays a role in increased corporate giving.

Tekula said in an interview with SHRM Online that the Catalyst study lacks data showing that women are completely responsible for increased giving on behalf of Fortune 500 companies.  The Catalyst study report authors agree with Tekula, writing: “Going beyond correlation—proving that gender-inclusiveness leadership actually causes companies to be more socially responsible—can be difficult given all the factors at play.”

“Companies are realizing that advancing more women to senior leadership roles has many benefits, including increased financial performance and sustainability,” Anabel Perez, Catalyst’s senior vice president of development, said in a statement. “As this study shows, inclusive leadership has a positive influence on the quantity and quality of an organization’s Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives. When business leadership includes women, society wins.”

Tekula agreed, explaining that such studies help companies recruit talent. “Companies that actively pursue CSR practices improve the firm’s recruiting power,” she said.  “Human resources [professionals] want to get the best of the best, and if the most competitive candidates are those who value social responsibility, then a strong CSR policy will ultimately have a positive effect on a company’s bottom line.”

Interest.com: “6 ways to make giving to charity work for you”

Your mother always taught you to share with others. Yet, it’s often difficult to choose a charity and to know when to give, how much to give and when to move on to another cause. Pace’s Dr. Rebecca Tekula advises why it is important to “do your research” before giving back.

Interest.com, a Bankrate website which claims a readership of 500,000 monthly, helps consumers make smart decisions about almost every aspect of their financial lives, including donating to a cause they care about.

Rebecca Tekula, executive director of the Helene and Grant Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Pace University in New York, advocates using online resources to determine which charities really deserve your money.

Tip 5. Do your research.

Tekula suggests that people look at their philanthropic investments in the same way they’d view other investments.

You’re not only investing your funds, you also need to consider long-term expectations.

In addition to investigating a cause’s website, Tekula shares some of her favorite online resources for researching charities:

Guidestar — This is a great starting-off point and fundamental resource for analyzing facts, including tax returns and salaries.
Charity Navigator — This website uses a star system based on evolving and sophisticated fundamentals of the organizations. A great resource for the financially savvy reader that looks at the charities the way you look at a business, based on return on philanthropic investment, return on social investment.
GiveWell — The next step in evaluating a charity, according to Tekula, the top-rated charities it recommends are proven, cost effective, underfunded and outstanding.

To read all “6 ways to make giving to charity work for you” – click here 

“It’s Time” … To Announce Results of Pace University’s Largest and Most Successful Fundraising Effort

Pace University has concluded the most ambitious fundraising effort in its 104-year history. It’s Time: The Centennial Campaign for Pace University was publicly launched on April 24, 2007 with a goal of $100 million. Pace raised $101,096,941 in cash and pledges since the campaign’s inception in 2003.

Media Contact: Samuella Becker, Pace Public Information, 212-346-1637 or 917-734-5172, Sbecker2@pace.edu

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

“It’s Time” … To Announce Results of Pace University’s Largest and Most Successful Fundraising Effort

  • Pace Raises $101 Million
  • Student Financial Aid Top Priority with $21 Million Raised for Scholarships
  • $15 Million Gift Establishes Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems
  • 16 Single Gifts of $1 Million +
  • 6,417 First-Time Donors

NEW YORK, July 26, 2010 – Pace University has concluded the most ambitious fundraising effort in its 104-year history.

It’s Time: The Centennial Campaign for Pace University was publicly launched on April 24, 2007 with a goal of $100 million. “Since the start of the campaign, more than 16,813 individuals and organizations – including 12,365 alumni – have stepped forward to make critical investments in the school,” said Pace President Stephen J. Friedman. “This is truly inspiring and a vote of confidence in the University!”

Pace raised $101,096,941 in cash and pledges since the campaign’s inception in 2003. “The fact that we had reached the goal was first publicly announced on April 29th at our 47th Leaders in Management Awards dinner, which honored David J. Pecker, President and CEO of American Media, and Gurbaksh Chahal, Founder and CEO of gWallet,” said Christine Meola, Pace Vice President of Development and Alumni Relations.

Ivan G. Seidenberg (MBA ’81), chairman of the board and chief executive officer of Verizon Communications, donated the largest gift in Pace’s history, $15 million, which was awarded to the School of Computer Science and Information Systems in October 2005. One-third of his naming gift will support the Seidenberg Scholars Program, a program dedicated to recruiting and supporting top computing students from across the country. Seidenberg, a member of the Pace Board of Trustees, chaired the It’s Time campaign and led the 17-member Campaign Executive Committee.

Other noteworthy naming gifts:

  • The Dyson Foundation awarded Dyson College a gift of $7.5 million.  $5 million was directed to the renovation of the science labs on the Pleasantville Campus, $2 million funds scholarships in psychology, communications and media, performing arts, fine arts, and environmental science and environmental studies, and $500,000 created the Dyson Student Opportunities Fund, which funds special activities for students.  This was the largest of the gifts marking the Foundation’s 50th Anniversary and reflects a partnership between the Dyson family and Pace that began 75 years ago in 1930 when Charles H. Dyson graduated.  Dyson became a pioneer in leveraged buyouts, was founder of the privately held investment firm Dyson-Kissner-Moran, undertook government assignments during the administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt, and served as Chairman of Pace’s Board of Trustees.
  • The Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship was launched with a $5 million pledge from Helene (BBA ’66) and Grant Wilson, Boston-area entrepreneurs and philanthropists whose involvement with nonprofit organizations has convinced them that more entrepreneurial management can help these organizations increase their impact.
  • The Carl and Lily Pforzheimer Foundation made a gift of $2 million toward the Pforzheimer Honors College Endowment.  The Pforzheimer family has made many contributions to the betterment of Pace University over the past 47 years. The investment banker Carl H. Pforzheimer III is a trustee emeritus and was chair of the board from 1990 to 1999; his mother, Carol, a trustee emerita, served on the board from 1973 to 1979.

Additional Campaign highlights:

  • Trustees of Pace have collectively contributed more than $23 million to date, demonstrating their bold leadership and commitment to this historic effort.
  • 16 single gifts of $1 million or more, reflecting Pace’s ability to inspire gifts of remarkable generosity.
  • 6,417 first-time donors to the University, including 4,360 alumni who contributed $35.6 million.
  • $21 million raised for scholarships
  • $800,000 earmarked for Pace’s Division II sports programs, including scholarships and capital improvements to athletic facilities
  • An earlier Pace campaign, launched in 1995 and concluded in 2000, raised $61 million over a five-year period. The goal of that campaign was $55 million.

What’s next?  According to Friedman, “The conclusion of the Centennial Campaign doesn’t mean the end of our efforts to seek support to make Pace a better university. On the contrary, it signals another new beginning.  Our graduates are making a difference in every field and profession, ranging from the arts to business to healthcare to environmental law. Thus we will continue to press forward as we seek support for implementing the vision laid out in our new Strategic Plan … and moving Pace to a new level of excellence over the next five years.”

About Pace: For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Pace University Names Christine M. Meola Vice President for Philanthropy

Christine M. Meola has been appointed vice president for Philanthropy at Pace University, effective June 1. She will direct all fundraising activities for the 13,000-student institution and its 120,000 alumni, including completion of the “It’s Time” capital campaign which so far has raised $88.8 million toward its $100 million goal.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

Photo is available. Please email wcaldwell@pace.edu

Pace University Names Christine M. Meola Vice President for Philanthropy

Head of Columbus Citizens Foundation, producer of Columbus Celebration and Columbus Day parade, and former Director of Development at NY Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical Center

NEW YORK, NY, May 7, 2009 – Christine M. Meola has been appointed vice president for Philanthropy at Pace University, effective June 1. She will direct all fundraising activities for the 13,000-student institution and its 120,000 alumni, including completion of the “It’s Time” capital campaign which so far has raised $88.8 million toward its $100 million goal.

Since 2006 Meola has been Executive Director of the Columbus Citizens Foundation. As both chief executive and chief development officer, she oversees the Columbus Celebration and the member-supported scholarship program, which together help the foundation raise $4 million annually for college scholarships that support 800 students.

Previously, Meola was Director of Development at New York Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical Center, where she was a member of a senior management team that reported to the Vice President/Vice Provost for Development.

In that role she was responsible for six major divisions: Fundraising Programs, Communications, Special Events, Planned Giving, Corporate and Foundation Relations, and the New York Weill Cornell Council. During her time at the institution, New York Presbyterian Hospital and Weill Cornell Medical College were in the midst of $1 billion and $750 million campaigns, respectively.

Posts at Fordham and Manhattan College. In higher education, Meola rose through a number of development positions at Fordham University to the role of Assistant Vice President for Development, where she managed a staff of 36 and held overall responsibility for University-wide major gift fundraising, including strategic planning, goal setting, programmatic implementation, and assessment. Before her work at Fordham, she held positions at Manhattan College in fundraising and in counseling and career services.

A Manhattan resident, Meola holds B.S. and M.A. degrees from Fordham University.

Thinkers and achievers. Said Pace’s President, Stephen J. Friedman, “Christine Meola comes to Pace as increasing energy and commitment have turned around our enrollment and improved our financial stability and academic programs. She is a superb leader and seasoned fundraiser who will expand our fundraising program and our base of support, providing Pace with the resources we need to keep graduating thinkers and achievers who will be leaders in their chosen professions.”

Meola noted, “Pace is on an exciting trajectory. It has a history of providing opportunities that significantly raise students’ prospects, and many of its graduates are very successful and deeply value the contribution that Pace made to their careers. I look forward to engaging alumni and friends more fully in the life of the University, and to securing their support to provide scholarships, enhance facilities and strengthen the faculty. Together, we will improve even further Pace’s ability to transform the lives and realize the ambitions of new generations of students.”

For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Pace University Appoints Laura Fredricks, JD, as Vice President for Philanthropy

David A. Caputo, president of Pace University, recently announced the appointment of Laura Fredricks, JD, as Vice President for Philanthropy. Fredricks assumed her new position on April 22, 2002.

New York, NY – April 29, 2002 – David A. Caputo, president of Pace University, recently announced the appointment of Laura Fredricks, JD, as Vice President for Philanthropy. Fredricks assumed her new position on April 22, 2002.

“Ms. Fredricks brings to Pace a wealth of experience and leadership in corporate and foundation funding and alumni relations,” says President Caputo. “I am delighted to have someone with her abilities and energy to lead the University’s development and alumni relations efforts and spearhead all of our philanthropic efforts.”

Prior to joining Pace, Fredricks was Associate Vice President for Development at Temple University in Philadelphia, where she managed and coordinated the major and planned giving programs, corporate and foundation funding, and alumni relations for 15 schools and colleges, two hospitals and the athletic program. Additionally she has served as Major Gifts Manager for Deborah Hospital Foundation, Assistant Director of Development for Temple University’s School of Medicine, and Director of the Philadelphia Bar Foundation.

Fredricks is a journalism graduate of Rutgers College and holds a law degree from Western New England College School of Law. Prior to her fundraising career, she practiced law for over six years as a Deputy Attorney General IV for the Attorney General’s Office, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, specializing in civil litigation. She has been active with the Association of Fundraising Professionals as an executive board member for the Greater Philadelphia Chapter for six years, and a committee member on the national level. She has served for many years as a volunteer for the Philadelphia YMCA and Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Philadelphia and as a member of her law school advisory board and the University of Pennsylvania Special Programs’ Advisory Board.

Fredricks teaches nonprofit business management and major gift and planned giving courses at the University of Pennsylvania, Duke University, and the Smithsonian Institution and is a featured speaker at the Association of Fundraising Professionals’ International Conference.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, and the Lienhard School of Nursing.