Catch The Rising Stars: Actors Studio Drama School Repertory Season Begins March 24

This year’s 31 Master of Fine Arts (MFA) candidates of the Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University have lived throughout the world (six countries, 19 states and two Caribbean islands). They’ve played professional tennis, recited slam poetry, and pirouetted in a tutu, as well as acted classically, comedically and experimentally. But all have chosen to spend the last three years in New York City, two express subway stops from Broadway … following their dream and refining their craft as actors, directors or playwrights in the only Masters’ theater program endorsed by the renowned Actors Studio.

Media Contact (photos on request)

Samuella Becker, Pace University, 212-346-1637 or 917-734-5172, Sbecker2@pace.edu

CATCH THE RISING STARS

19 ACTORS, 8 PLAYWRIGHTS, 4 (ALL-FEMALE) DIRECTORS … AND THE “ONE & ONLY” ACTORS STUDIO DRAMA SCHOOL AT PACE UNIVERSITY

LIMITED RUN: 2010 Repertory Season, March 24 through May 1

Free Theater Performances; General Public Invited

World Premieres: EMPTY BASKET, MALNATI MONDAY, MONKEY PLAY, OINK!, ON MULES WE FIND, THE LOBBY, THE MUTED PLANTATION, UNEARTHING THE TRAMP

Plays and Scenes from Edward Allan Baker, Stephen Belber, Kathryn Grant, Murphy Guyer, Lynn Nottage, Martin McDonagh, Dorothy Parker, Harold Pinter, John Patrick Shanley, Neil Simon

NEW YORK, NY, March 9, 2010 –This year’s 31 Master of Fine Arts (MFA) candidates of the Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University have lived throughout the world (six countries, 19 states and two Caribbean islands). They’ve played professional tennis, recited slam poetry, and pirouetted in a tutu, as well as acted classically, comedically and experimentally. But all have chosen to spend the last three years in New York City, two express subway stops from Broadway … following their dream and refining their craft as actors, directors or playwrights in the only Masters’ theater program endorsed by the renowned Actors Studio.

These 31 “rising stars” will make their professional debuts in a six-week repertory season that is open to the public beginning Wednesday, March 24, but are not total unknowns. Since the fall of 2007, they’ve been observed by viewers in 89 million homes and 125 countries around the globe as a result of the telecast of their master craft seminar, “Inside the Actors Studio,” hosted on Bravo TV by the school’s Dean Emeritus James Lipton.

This bird’s-eye view of industry greats also comes with red carpet/Schimmel Theater stage interview privileges, allowing the students to personally pose their very own questions “up close and personal” to Oscar, Emmy, Golden Globe and Grammy award winners they someday hope to emulate, Lipton guests such as: Judd Apatow, Jason Bateman, Halle Berry, Jon Bon Jovi, David Bryan, James Cameron, Danny DeVito, The Family Guy Cast, Ricky Gervais, Kate Hudson, Denis Leary, Laura Linney, Conan O’Brien, Amy Poehler, Daniel Radcliffe, Diana Ross, Mickey Rourke, Richie Sambora, Brooke Shields, Christian Slater, Hilary Swank and Tico Torres.

The 2010 Actors Studio Drama School Repertory Season performances will take place at the theater at Dance New Amsterdam, 53 Chambers St., just north of City Hall, Wednesdays through Fridays at 8 p.m. and Saturdays at 3 and 8 p.m. from March 24 through May 1. The full schedule and information about plays, actors, directors and playwrights can be found online at www.Pace.edu/ASDSRep

Admission is free, but reservations must be made in advance by phone or e-mail as seating is limited. The 24-hour reservation line is: (212) 714-4643 and email is ASDSRepTickets@gmail.com The works are considered educational and may not be reviewed.

Freedom to Flourish

Eight original one-act plays have been developed by the MFA emerging playwrights for the 2010 repertory season, with themes focusing on a surprise reunion, hostile friendship, forgiveness, extortion, fortitude, Louisiana plantation murder, father-daughter fractured relationship and monkey madness.

Established playwrights with one-act productions or scenes showcased are Edward Allan Baker/ROSEMARY WITH GINGER, Stephen Belber/TAPE, Kathryn Grant/THE WOUND OF LOVE, Murphy Guyer/LOYALITIES, Martin McDonagh/THE PILLOWMAN, Lynn Nottage/RUINED, Dorothy Parker/HERE WE ARE, Harold Pinter/ONE FOR THE ROAD, John Patrick Shanley/DANNY AND THE DEEP BLUE SEA, Neil Simon/THE PRISONER OF SECOND AVENUE.

Who’s Directing the Show? She is!

Directors direct not just one production (as at other MFA programs) but several of varied style, length and genre. “After working so closely with the professional repertory team, our directors (which this year, for the first time in our 12-year history, are all women) find that they have established strong working relationship in the New York theatre community on which to build the foundation of a professional career after graduation,” said Andreas Manolikakis, who has been a member of The Actors Studio since 1987 and is the Chair of the Actors Studio Drama School MFA Program. “This of course applies to our actors and playwrights, as well.”

“Real” Rep Season: Off-Broadway, Practical Level Experience

“The season is produced, managed, and designed by union member industry professionals, creating an actual Off-Broadway experience that prepares our graduates with practical experience as working professionals before graduation,” said Manolikakis. “Unlike other MFA programs’ productions, we provide each and every student actor with the opportunity to be the ‘lead’ in a production. In many other programs, a few students carry those roles while the rest ‘carry spears.’”

“The Actors Studio Drama School Repertory Season is real repertory where our students work as a repertory company – acting, directing and writing the material – creating collaborations that can last a lifetime,” concluded Manolikakis.

The Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University is the only MFA theater program officially sanctioned by The Actors Studio. The entire faculty is chosen and approved – and the curriculum is designed and supervised – by the leadership of The Actors Studio through its Curriculum Advisory Committee, including the Presidents of The Actors Studio, Ellen Burstyn, Harvey Keitel and Al Pacino. All students — actors, directors, playwrights – train side-by-side as actors. All students participate in the Craft Seminars known to the world as the Bravo Network television series, “Inside the Actors Studio,” hosted by James Lipton. For further information about the program, go to www.pace.edu/actorsstudiomfa

About Pace University

For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. Visit Pace on the web at www.pace.edu| Facebook | Twitter (@PaceUNews) | Flickr | YouTube

FOUR Days! EIGHT Playwrights! ONE Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University!

The death of a father, medical ethics, a drag queen, family secrets, mental illness, love, an honest detective and a family caught up in a hurricane (both internal conflicts AND the weather) are the themes resonating in the MFA playwrights’ staged reading series presented by the acclaimed Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University during the weekends of February 27 and 28 and March 6 and 7.

Media Contact: Samuella Becker, Pace University, 212-346-1637, 917-734-5172 or sbecker2@pace.edu

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Discover New Talent – 2010 MFA Playwriting Showcase

Live from Studio W509, Pace University – New York City Campus

Actors Studio Drama School Presents Full-Length Staged Readings of a New Musical and Seven Original Plays over Two Consecutive Weekends – February 27 & 28; March 6 & 7

Free and Open to the Public

NEW YORK, NY, February 18, 2010 – The death of a father, medical ethics, a drag queen, family secrets, mental illness, love, an honest detective and a family caught up in a hurricane (both internal conflicts AND the weather) are the themes resonating in the MFA playwrights’ staged reading series presented by the acclaimed Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University during the weekends of February 27 and 28 and March 6 and 7.

The eight works-in-progress – one musical and seven contemporary dramas – were written and developed by the school’s third-year master’s degree students. The aspiring playwrights will be joined in their Off-Off Broadway debuts by their fellow acting and directing classmates, along with recent MFA alumni and current BFA students.

Performances of the Actors Studio Drama School’s MFA Playwriting Showcase will take place weekend afternoons at 1 pm and 4 pm at Studio W509, a black box theater in the main building of Pace’s downtown Manhattan campus just east of City Hall at Park Row and Spruce Street. Tickets are free but space is limited so reservations are strongly advised.

For reservations and more information, visit www.Pace.edu/ASDSEvents or call (212) 714-4643.

Storytellers of Tomorrow

“The staged readings are a wonderful opportunity for the audience to discover the great American ‘professional storytellers’ of tomorrow,” said Associate Professor Edward Allan Baker, a published and frequently produced New York City playwright with 32 plays to his credit — most notably, DOLORES (which starred Joan Allen and is included in The Best Short Plays of 1989), NORTH OF PROVIDENCE, PRAIRIE AVENUE (which starred Ed Harris), ROSEMARY WITH GINGER and FACE DIVIDED (which starred Sam Rockwell).

Questionnaires given to audience members after each staged reading will allow playwrights to gain perspective of their scripts “performance power” and further assist them as they continue to develop their works.

This year’s eight, original full-length staged readings are:

TOPPING FROM BELOW

A new full-length musical with book by Christina Cigala

Saturday, February 27 at 1 pm

Chloe’s a drag queen. She’s got somebody tied up on her sofa. Also, that boy and that girl keep breakin’ up and yellin’ about it. Cue the music.

Music & Lyrics: Amanda Palmer

Director: Bridget Leak

Setting: Present day, New York City

Cast: Brad Harris, Jeanne Joe Perrone, Trey Tatum, Dario Torres, Christina Cigala

MAMA’S LAW

A new full-length play by Trey Tatum

Saturday, February 27 at 4 pm

Refusing to evacuate during an impending hurricane, a family reunion turns into a fight for survival. Waters and tempers rise as three siblings are trapped between long-suppressed memories and the raging storm outside.

Director: Bridget Leak

Setting: July 4th weekend. The present.

Cast: Shaz Khan, Dario Torres, Ashley Love, Melissa Rosenberger, Hannah Timmons, Abigail Treut

BROKEN RECORD

A new full-length play by Nicholas Priore

Sunday, February 28 at 1 pm

A weary mother attempts to provide her mentally-ill son with a better life by having him cared for by one of his siblings, whose resistance unleashes revelations long kept under the proverbial rug.

Director: Norma Medina

Setting: The east side of a small city in Central New York, 1995, once an Italian American community.

Cast: Chris Ferretti, Norma Medina, Marco Agnolucci, L.B. Roberts, Lawrence Sharp, Sarah Anfora, Steve Nicholas

BLOOD MOLOTOV

A new full-length play by Chris Pierce

Sunday, February 28 at 4 pm

A tawdry, insane, phantasmagoric love story reminiscent of a Eugene Ionesco play, which asks the question, “Who’s what and what is who, and do they even know?”

Director: Jamie Sellers

Setting: An office reminiscent of 50’s Noir, a strange dungeon like room.

Cast: Beau Burglund, Shereen Macklin, Shaz Khan Stage Directions: Brandon Stock

FREEDOM AT BLACKBIRD

A new full-length play by L.B. Roberts

Saturday, March 6 at 1 pm

A down-on-his-luck private eye is searching for his next case. Too honest to do dirty cases and too nice to turn down a beautiful woman, he becomes embroiled in a case with more faces than a Picasso painting.

Director: Bridget Leak

Setting: The 1940’s.

Cast: Marco Agnolucci, Dario Torres, Treasure Davidson, Ashley Love, Trey Tatum, Melinda Graham Raj, Vin Kridakorn, Marcus Terrell Smith, Suzanne Darrell

NEEDLES: A CHRISTMAS PLAY

A new full-length play by Katie Buckels

Saturday, March 6 at 4 pm

An old family friend arrives at a Christmas Eve party with a suitcase and a buried secret that ignites a struggle between the past and future.

Director; Jamie Sellers

Setting: The Godfrey house on Christmas Eve.

Cast: Melinda Graham Raj, Maria Roman, Jason Green, Nicholas Piore, Abigail Treut

Stage Directions: Anthony Cotto

REFUTING MILGRAM

A new full-length play by Christopher Edward Moss

Sunday, March 7 at 1 pm

An Illinois psychologist whose job and marriage are hanging by a thread has to choose between his career and his morals as he is pressured to conduct an unethical study.

Director: Jamie Sellers

Setting: A small state school in a dying town, Central Illinois. The start of a new school year, 2009.

Cast: Michael Albert, Treasure Davidson, Yoni Ben-Yehuda, Ashley Love, Lawrence Sharp, Chelese Belmont, Abigail Treut Stage Directions: Alla Ilysova

THE FIRST KISS

A new full-length play by Carston Turner

Sunday, March 7 at 4 pm

A brother and sister reunite to deal with the death of their father. One daughter is on the hunt for a child rapist. One son, a child prodigy pianist, comes home after 20 years. A mother, mute for 20 years, holds the answers to the questions they both need to know.

Director: Jee Hyun Jung

Setting: A funeral home. The present.

Cast: Karreem Washington, Shereen Macklin, Suzanne Darrell, Osas Ighodaro, Ruben Del Valle, Jr.

About Pace University

For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. Visit Pace on the web at www.pace.edu| Facebook | Twitter (@PaceUNews) | Flickr | YouTube

The Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University is the only MFA theater program officially sanctioned by the Actors Studio. The entire faculty is chosen and approved – and the curriculum is designed and supervised – by the leadership of the Actors Studio through its Curriculum Advisory Committee, including the Presidents of the Actors Studio, Ellen Burstyn, Harvey Keitel and Al Pacino. All students — actors, directors, playwrights — train side-by-side as actors. All students participate in the Craft Seminars known to the world as the Bravo Network television series, “Inside the Actors Studio,” hosted by James Lipton. For further information about the program, go to www.pace.edu/actorsstudiomfa

Pace University Welcomes Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre’s Love’s Labour’s Lost

When the curtain goes up on Shakespeare’s Globe company’s performance of Love’s Labour’s Lost on December 8 at Pace University, it will mark the company’s first New York appearance since the sold-out tour of Merry Wives of Windsor in 2005. Now directed by Dominic Dromgoole, who succeeded Mark Rylance in 2003 as Artistic Director, Love’s Labour’s Lost will be completing a two-month national tour with performances through Monday evening, December 21. Opening Night is Thursday, December 10th at 8pm. Both the 2005 and 2009 tours were produced by John Luckacovic and Eleanor Oldham of 2Luck Concepts.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contacts: (Pace University) Chris Cory, 212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu or Samuella Becker, 212-346-1637, cell 917-734-5172, sbecker2@pace.edu; (Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre) Richard Kornberg 212-944-9444, Richard@Kornbergpr.com

NEW YORK CITY WELCOMES SHAKESPEARE’S GLOBE THEATRE’S LOVE’S LABOUR’S LOST

When the curtain goes up on Shakespeare’s Globe company’s performance of Love’s Labour’s Lost on December 8 at Pace University, it will mark the company’s first New York appearance since the sold-out tour of Merry Wives of Windsor in 2005. Now directed by Dominic Dromgoole, who succeeded Mark Rylance in 2003 as Artistic Director, Love’s Labour’s Lost will be completing a two-month national tour with performances through Monday evening, December 21. Opening Night is Thursday, December 10th at 8pm. Both the 2005 and 2009 tours were produced by John Luckacovic and Eleanor Oldham of 2Luck Concepts.

In Love’s Labour’s Lost self-denial is in fashion at the court of Navarre where the young King and three of his noblemen solemnly forswear the company of women in favor of serious study. But the lovely, sharp-tongued Princess of France and her all-too-lovely entourage soon arrive with other ideas and it isn’t long before young love, with its flirtations, hesitations and embarrassments, has broken every self-imposed rule set by the young men.

Written shortly after he completed the sonnets, Shakespeare’s boisterous send-up of all those who try to turn their back on life, is a festive parade of every weapon in the youthful playwright’s comic arsenal: from excruciating cross-purposes and impersonations, to drunkenness, fist-fights and pratfalls. Even more, it is a joyful banquet of language, full of puns, rhymes, bizarre syntax, grotesque coinages and parodies, which the company made their own through a unique rehearsal process for performances at Shakespeare’s Globe in 2007, and a revival last summer. And appropriately enough, it is a play that Queen Elizabeth the first commanded for her own holiday festivities nearly 400 years ago.

Contuning in their leading-roles in the touringproduction are Michelle Terry as The Princess of France and Trystan Gravelle as Berowne, along with Seroca Davis, Christopher Godwin, William Mannering, Rhiannon Oliver and Andrew Vincent. Joining them in the Globe company are Jade Anouka, Phil Cumbus, Jack Farthing, Patrick Godfrey, Fergal McElherron, Thomasin Rand, Paul Ready, Siân Robins-Grace and Tom Stuart.

The production has designs by Jonathan Fensom and music by Claire van Kampen. “Love’s Labour’s Lost” will employ Renaissance staging, costume and music, as well as a seating arrangement and staging designed to involve the audience as nearly as possible in the physical immediacy of seeing a play at The Globe, with actors moving beyond the stage, and the theatre bathed in “daylight” at all times.

Dominic Dromgoole is the Artistic Director of Shakespeare’s Globe. His previous work at the Globe includes King Lear, Love’s Labour’s Lost, Coriolanus and Antony and Cleopatra. This season he is also directing Romeo and Juliet and A New World: A Life of Thomas Paine by Trevor Griffiths. He was Artistic Director of the Oxford Stage Company (1999-2005) and the Bush Theatre (1990-1996), and Director of New Plays for the Peter Hall Company (1996/7). He has also directed at the Tricycle Theatre, in the West End, and in America and Romania. Dominic has written two books, The Full Room (2001) and Will & Me (2006).

Jonathan Fensom most recently worked at Stratford Shakespeare Festival as the designer of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Jonathan was nominated for a Tony Award for his set design for Journey’s End in 2007 and was associate designer on Disney’s The Lion King, which premièred at the New Amsterdam Theatre on Broadway and has subsequently opened worldwide. He has designed more than 50 productions worldwide, from Shakespeare to ballet to modern classics. Other recent productions include King Lear and Love’s Labour’s Lost at Shakespeare’s Globe; Swan Lake for San Francisco Ballet; The Faith Healer, Journey’s End, The American Plan and Pygmalion in New York; Rain Man, Some Girls, Twelfth Night and Crown Matrimonial in the West End; The Homecoming and Big White Fog at the Almeida Theatre; Happy Now?, The Mentalists and Burn/Citizenship/Chatroom at the National Theatre; Talking to Terrorists and The Sugar Syndrome at the Royal Court Theatre; and National Anthems at the Old Vic.

Claire van Kampen trained at the Royal College of music, specialising in the performance of contemporary music, and studying composition with Dr. Ruth Gipps. In 1986 she joined the RSC and the Royal National Theatre, becoming the first female musical director with both companies. Her international career as composer, performer, writer and broadcaster has produced scores for many theatre productions, television and film. In 1990 she co-founded the theatre company Phoebus Cart with Mark Rylance. Their production of Shakespeare’s The Tempest was performed in the foundations of the Globe in 1991. As Director of theatre Music during its founding ten years, Claire was involved in creating the music for over 30 Globe productions between 1997 and 2006. Recent Globe productions include: Love’s Labour’s Lost (2007), King Lear (2008) and Helen (2009). Awards include; the Vero Nihil Verius Award for Distinguished Achievement in the Arts by Concordia University (Oregon, USA), and the 2007 Sam Wanamaker Award (with Mark Rylance and Jenny Tiramani for their ‘Original Practices’ productions at the Globe.) Recent work includes: Observe the Sons of Ulster Marching Towards the Somme (Hampstead Theatre); Bash (West End); Boeing-Boeing (West End and Broadway, NY); I Am Shakespeare (Chichester Festival Theatre); Peer Gynt (Guthrie Theater, Minneapolis); Romeo and Juliet (Middle Temple Hall festival). Film: Nocturne (Ind.2009). As a writer, Claire is creating a new play about the castrato Farinelli, and also writing both book and music for Grand Central, a musical to be produced in New York.

Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre was founded by the late and pioneering American actor/director Sam Wanamaker, who persevered for nearly 30 years to rebuild a replica of the Globe near its original site in London. Since the Globe’s reopening by Her Majesty the Queen in 1997, the theatre has fulfilled its vision of recreating for audiences the infectious energy and spontaneity of Shakespeare plays as they were originally presented in an urban amphitheater.

Pace University’s Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, located in New Amsterdam’s original theatre district near City Hall in lower Manhattan, has presented a wide range of cultural programs and public events for the campus and surrounding community since 1969. In addition to student productions and special events, the Michael Schimmel Center was the home of Tony Randall’s National Actors Theatre, a founding venue of the Tribeca Film Festival and Tribeca Theater Festival, and a presenting partner of the River-to-River Festival. The Center also hosts international companies such as the Beijing People’s Art Theatre. When not in use for performances, the theatre is home to the award-winning television program Inside the Actors Studio.

Love’s Labour’s Lost will be performed at the Michael Schimmel Center at Pace University located at 3 Spruce Street, east of Park Row, near the corner of Gold Street.

Performances begin Tuesday, December 8th and follow a Tuesdays – Fridays at 8pm, Saturdays at 2 & 8, and Sundays at 3 & 7 schedule with no Tuesday, December 15th Performance, and closing Monday, December 21st at 8pm.

Tickets are $25-$75 and available through www.smarttix.com or by calling 212-868-4444.

New play aims at scarcity of Native Americans in Hudson celebrations

To highlight the neglected Native American “view from the shore,” Pace University has commissioned a dramatization of the early encounters that conveys feelings on both sides.

PREMIERE THIS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17. MEDIA WELCOME. At the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in New York, 1 Bowling Green. Reception, 5:30-7:00 p.m., performance 7:00-8:00 p.m.

Media should RSVP to Samuella Becker, 212-346-1637, cell 917-734-5172, sbecker2@pace.edu

MEDIA ALSO WELCOME AT PUBLIC PERFORMANCES LISTED BELOW. Please RSVP to the media contact at the relevant campus.

New play aims at scarcity of Native Americans in “Eurocentric” Hudson quadricentennial celebrations

Portrays fatal culture clashes, stresses of first contact

Pace University commissions work by Native American writer Joseph Bruchac

Invitational Premiere Sept 17 at Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, public performances Sept. 24-27 in Troy, New York City, Poughkeepsie

NEW YORK, NY, September 14, 2009 – “It is shocking to see how dreadfully little in this year’s celebrations even acknowledges the populations who watched the mutilated native drown in the Hudson’s tides.”

So says Geoffrey L. Brackett, the Provost of Pace University, speaking about this fall’s continuing quadricentennial celebrations of Henry Hudson’s voyage up the river that now bears his name.

The mutilated brave, his hand cut off by Hudson’s crew, was a member of the Native American tribes who greeted the explorers and traded with Hudson. Then came misunderstandings, mistrust, and fatal exchanges of arrows and gunfire.

To highlight the neglected Native American “view from the shore,” Pace University has commissioned a dramatization of the early encounters that conveys feelings on both sides.

“River of Tides” is written by the prolific Native American novelist, storyteller and poet Joseph Bruchac (Abenaki), who based it on events in the journal of Hudson’s first mate, Robert Juet.

An invitation-only premiere (media welcome) is being presented by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in New York, the George Gustav Heye Center, this Thursday evening, September 17. Reception 6:30-7, performance 7:00-8:00 p.m.

Three free performances will then be presented at locations along the route of Hudson’s journey: Thursday morning, September 24, at the Sage College campus in Troy, NY (in collaboration with Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute), Saturday evening, September 26, at Pace University’s downtown Manhattan campus, and Sunday afternoon, September 27, at Marist College in Poughkeepsie.

A “talkback” session with the director and actors will take place after each performance to air some of the perennial questions the play raises about encounters between strangers.

The diverse troupe of actors, including several Native Americans, is being directed by Ruis Woertendyke, an off-Broadway director who heads Pace’s department of performing arts.

Further information on locations and times is available from the institutions.

Pace and the museum will present a shorter version of the play to children in New York City public and private schools at the museum from October 6 through 9.

Obliterated from consciousness

“The Native voice is an essential part of our shared history,” says John Haworth (Cherokee), director of the National Museum of the American Indian in New York (NMAI). “We are delighted to be working with our friends Joe Bruchac and Pace University on this important project.”

The scarcity of native material in the NY400, Hudson 400 and Exploreny400 celebrations reflects a larger issue, namely the “obliteration from our societal consciousness” of the millions of peoples and dozens of tribes who occupied the Hudson Valley when the Half Moon arrived, according to Brackett, the Pace provost.

“We hope this work will help balance the Eurocentric emphasis of much of the celebration of Henry Hudson’s enormously important exploration,” he says.

The work’s characters portray culture shock afflicting natives and a fearful and patronizing crew, escalating into the deaths of one Englishman and 21 natives.

By the end, as Woertendyke puts it, “the ‘civilized’ are savages and the ‘savages’ are civilized.”

Children’s version

The version of the play for elementary-school children, and a teacher’s guide, are being developed by the NMAI and the Pace University School of Education. To register for school performances, educators should contact Ada Torres at the museum at 212-514-3705.

Performance Schedule (all performances are free and followed by a talkback session with the director and cast)

Thursday, September 24, Troy, NY, 10:30 AM, Bush Memorial Hall, Russell Sage College, 45 Ferry St. This performance precedes a public symposium on “The Upper Hudson River Valley: Then and Now” with RPI and Sage Colleges professors.

Saturday, September 26, New York, NY, 5 pm, Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, Pace University downtown Manhattan campus, 3 Spruce Street (East of Park Row, near the corner of Gold Street). Reservations suggested at www.SmartTix.com or 212-868-4444.

Sunday, September 27, Poughkeepsie, NY, 2 pm, Marist College Nelly Goletti Theatre, Student Center. Contact Hudson River Valley Institute, 845-575-3052, Andrew.villani@marist.edu

Tuesday-Friday, October 6-9, New York, NY, adaptation for elementary schools, National Museum of the American Indian in New York. To register for school performances educators should contact Ada Torres at 212-514-3705.

Cast

The diverse cast includes several Native American actors, including the actor and storyteller Joe Cross, from the Caddo tribe of Oklahoma, a veteran of network television and off-Broadway and regional theater. The British television and stage actor Jonathan Le Billon will create the role of Hudson’s first mate and journal-keeper Juet. Several cast members are working graduates of the Pace acting program.

Musical accompaniment for the performance will come from The Spirit of the Mountain Drummers and Singers, from the Ramapo Nation.

Playwright

Joseph Bruchac is a nationally acclaimed Native American novelist, playwright, storyteller and poet of Abenaki descent. His “Dawn Land” historical novels have been described as “the first attempt to reconstruct in fiction the daily life of the indigenous tribes of America prior to the coming of the Europeans.”

He is known for books about such Native American figures as Crazy Horse, Jim Thorpe, Squanto, and the Navajo Marines of World War II, and for his edited collections of Indian myths and legends. His poems, articles and stories have appeared in over 500 publications, from the National Geographic, Parabola and Smithsonian Magazine to the American Poetry Review, Cricket and Aboriginal Voices. He has written more than 70 books for adults and children, including “Keepers of the Earth” (co-authored with Michael Caduto), “Tell Me a Tale,” “When the Chenoo Howls” (co-authored with his son, James), his autobiography, “Bowman’s Store.” His highly praised anthologies of contemporary poetry and fiction include “Songs from this Earth on Turtle’s Back,” and “Breaking Silence,” winner of an American Book Award.

Director

From off-Broadway to campus theaters, Ruis Woertendyke has directed more than 100 plays, ranging from Euripides to Chekhov, O’Neill to Albee, and Handke to Artaud. He developed the BFA Acting program at Pace University and chairs the Performing Arts Department. His own plays have been seen at La Mama and the Samuel French One-Act Festival in NYC, in the Great Plains Theatre Conference in Omaha, Nebraska, and at the California Institute of the Arts.

Woertendyke adapted and performed Anton Chekhov’s “On the Harmfulness of Tobacco” for off-off Broadway performances in New York City and New Jersey, played Arturo Ui at the Hartman Theater in Hartford and Aaron Burr at La Mama. His voice can be heard on Sesame Street and on several children’s DVD’s. He has written more than forty articles of dramatic criticism for The Educational Theatre Journal and for The Villager and the Phoenix.

Media Contacts:

Pace University—Samuella Becker, 212-346-1637, cell 917-734-5172, sbecker2@pace.edu

National Museum of the American Indian—Ann Marie Sekeres, 212-514-3823, sekeresa@si.edu

Sage Colleges – Ardelle Hirsch, 518-244-4593, hirsca@sage.edu

RPI — Jessica Otitigbe, 518-276-6050, otitij@rpi.edu

Marist College—Tim Massey, 845-575-3174

The Actor’s Studio Drama School’s 2009 Repertory Season Opens April 15 -Four Weeks of Free Theatre

Avid viewers of James Lipton’s “Inside the Actors Studio,” seen in 89 million US homes and 125 countries, know that the young people in the first few rows are advanced students in what is really a seminar on the craft of theater, held in one of the world’s most famous drama schools – the Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Photos Available Upon Request

CURTAIN GOING UP IN LOWER MANHATTAN … ACTORS STUDIO DRAMA SCHOOL’S INAUGURAL REPERTORY SEASON AT PACE UNIVERSITY OFFERS FOUR WEEKS OF FREE THEATER, APRIL 15 – MAY 11

Intense one-act plays and scenes from Eugene O’Neill, William Mastrosimone, Sam Shepard, Romulus Linney, Caryl Churchill, John Osborne, Edward Allan Baker and others.

World Premiere of two Ellen Orchid plays: PRESCRIPTONS and DREAM WEDDING!

NEW YORK, NY April 13, 2009 – Avid viewers of James Lipton’s “Inside the Actors Studio,” seen in 89 million US homes and 125 countries, know that the young people in the first few rows are advanced students in what is really a seminar on the craft of theater, held in one of the world’s most famous drama schools – the Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University.

Now their moment has come to take the leap to center stage.

For the public, the result is four weeks of intense, fully-professional theater – free.

From April 15 through May 11 the 21 actors, three directors and one playwright in the first class to earn their Masters in Fine Arts (MFA) since the school moved to Pace in the fall of 2006 are presenting the school’s noted Repertory Season. The school is the only MFA theater program officially sanctioned by the Actors Studio, whose co-Presidents are Ellen Burstyn, Harvey Keitel and Al Pacino.

The rep season audience often includes members of the Actors Studio and other celebrities, including Lipton, the very active Dean Emeritus, as well as casting directors, agents and theatergoers looking, as one newspaper put it, for “the next DeNiro, Streep or Pacino.” The works presented are often frank cauldrons of raw emotions, chosen to challenge actors and directors to push themselves to their limits.

Performances take place at the Theater of Dance New Amsterdam, diagonally across from Pace’s downtown campus and north of City Hall Park at 53 Chambers Street, between Broadway and Centre Streets. Three to four works are performed each evening, Wednesdays through Saturdays at 8 PM, with Saturday matinees at 3 PM.

The fifth opening night is Monday evening, May 11, for a staged reading of a full-length play – DREAM WEDDING! – written by MFA graduate Ellen Orchid. Mirroring real life, the production comically depicts the lengths a group of graduates fresh out of a New York City theatre conservatory go to in order to remain an ensemble.

The full schedule and information about plays, performers and directors can be found online at www.pace.edu/pace/asdsrep09. Playwrights with work on display this year include Eugene O’Neill, William Mastrosimone, Sam Shepard, Romulus Linney, Caryl Churchill, John Osborne, and Edward Allan Baker.

Admission is free, but reservations must be made in advance by phone or e-mail as seating is limited. The 24-hour reservation line is: 212-613-6209 and the email address is: ASDSRepTickets@gmail.com.

The works are considered “in progress” and may not be reviewed.

Professional production values. The graduating MFA actors, directors, and this year, one playwright, are supported by a full professional stage crew providing set design, props, costumes, makeup, lighting and stage management.

For those on and off stage, the training has been intense and the motivation high.

“Collectively, the Studio’s actors, directors and playwrights have received a spectacular number of Oscar, Tony and Emmy awards,” said Andreas Manolikakis, Chair of the Actors Studio Drama School MFA Program at Pace and a member of the Acting and Directing Faculty. “Alone among America’s drama programs, we offer our students the privilege of personally observing the Actors Studio’s private sessions. In addition, we confer on our graduates the status of ‘Working Finalist’ at the Studio, a privilege that has led to admission to Studio life-membership for many of our alumni,” he added.

The Actors Studio Drama School‘s mission is to translate the 55-year experience of the Actors Studio into a three-year Master’s Degree program that trains its actors, playwrights and directors side-by-side in a coherent program organized around a central principle: The Stanislavski System.

The school is an academic division of Pace University, which is becoming an arts destination for students and the public alike. Its undergraduate performing arts program, and especially its Musical Theater specialty, now draws full houses to the University’s performance spaces and competes successfully for students with drama schools like that at NYU. The Pace Digital gallery and two visual art galleries show work by both students and professional artists; poetry readings and open lectures and seminars in the humanities present current work and thought.

Actors Studio involvement. From the outset of their training, all Actors Studio Drama School students participate in craft seminars, where the most accomplished members of the Actors Studio share their knowledge and experiences. Many Actors Studio artists also teach in intensive Friday Workshop sessions. While the Actors Studio itself – bicoastal, with locations in both New York City and Los Angeles – is a private space, accessible only to members, MFA candidates have the privilege of attending a number of the Studio’s closed-door sessions as observers. Each year, on a dozen or so occasions, the students also spend an evening or Sunday afternoon with some of the world’s most distinguished creative and performing artists in the “Inside the Actors Studio” craft seminars/tapings.

The comprehensive, three-year program is designed and taught by professional actors, writers, and directors to produce professional actors, writers and directors ready to go to work in theater, film and television. The curriculum includes course work in Acting, Playwriting, Directing, Scenic, Lighting and Costume Design, Voice and Speech, Movement, and Theater History as well as the “Inside the Actors Studio” craft seminars.

The Repertory Season represents the culmination of the intensive study. The productions are all directed and acted – and many written — by graduating students in their introduction to the public and the professional community.

About Pace. For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Media Contact Samuella Becker Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University 212-346-1637 or 917-734-5172 Sbecker2@pace.edu

Pace Volleyball Sophomore to Perform at Harlem’s Apollo Theater on March 4

Sophomore Victoria Pompilus (Mount Vernon, NY/Mount Vernon) is set to perform on the “big stage” at Amateur Night at Harlem’s famed Apollo Theater on Wednesday March 4 at 7:30 pm. A psychology major at Pace University, Pompilus is also a member of the Setter women’s volleyball team. Pompilus will be blogging about her experience at the Apollo at http://www.dysoncollege.blogspot.com.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 26, 2009

Women’s College Volleyball

POMPILUS TO SING AT AMATEUR NIGHT AT FAMED APOLLO THEATER

PLEASANTVILLE, NY– Sophomore Victoria Pompilus (Mount Vernon, NY/Mount Vernon) is set to perform on the “big stage” at Amateur Night at Harlem’s famed Apollo Theater on Wednesday March 4 at 7:30 pm. A psychology major at Pace University, Pompilus is also a member of the Setter women’s volleyball team. Pompilus will be blogging about her experience at the Apollo at http://www.dysoncollege.blogspot.com.

Pompilus earned a spot at Amateur Night after a successful audition in the fall, where she was among hundreds challenging to earn a ticket to perform. One of the songs she sang at the audition was “Whose Loving You” by the Michael Jackson and The Jackson Five, which she will being performing again at the March 4th event. The sophomore from Mount Vernon has always been musically inclined as she has also played the saxophone in the past, while also taking piano lessons at the Febbraio School of Music in Mount Vernon. In addition, Pompilus will also be competing at a talent show on March 7th at the Roosevelt High School in the Bronx.

On the volleyball court, Pompilus has developed into one of the top players in the Northeast-10 Conference. This past season, she ranked third in the conference in blocks, while finishing fourth on the team with 185 kills.

Amateur Night at the Apollo Theater is one of the oldest and most famed events at Harlem’s iconic landmark. Earlier this year on January 26, the Apollo celebrated its 75th anniversary of its amateur night competition. Since the 1930s, the event has launched the careers of some of the world’s greatest entertainers from Ella Fitzgerald and James Brown to the Jackson Five. Some of the female vocalists that have performed at Apollo in the past include such famous figures as Mary J. Blige, Brandy, Alicia Keys, Faith Evans and Eve. Amateur Night is all about pleasing the audience and the best performers from the event may be asked to return to sing at future events. For more on Amateur Night, go to http://www.apollotheater.org/amateur_night.html

Contact: John M. Tagliaferri Director of Athletic Media Relations/Sports Information Pace University 914-773-3888 (Office) 914-773-3491 (Fax) pacesettersathletics.com

NY Premiere of Beijing People’s Art Theatre

Yangtze Repertory Theatre of America, together with Columbia Productions, will present the New York debut of Beijing People’s Art Theater, arguably the most famous professional theatre company in China, in the play which is the cornerstone of its repertory, “Teahouse” by Lao She. The production will be November 27 to December 1 at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts at Pace University, 3 Spruce Street, (across the street from City Hall). The play will be performed in Mandarin Chinese with both English subtitles and simultaneous English translation through headphones.

This announcement was released by the YANGTZE REPERTORY THEATRE OF AMERICA about the NY premiere of “Teahouse” at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, November 27 through December 1.

Contact
JONATHAN SLAFF & ASSOCIATES
tel. 212-924-0496
js@jsnyc.com

LAO SHE’S “TEAHOUSE” BY BEIJING PEOPLE’S ART THEATRE

China’s most prestigious theater company in its New York debut

Pioneer social drama traces the progressively chaotic historical events, from the end of the Qing dynasty to post-Liberation times through a Beijing teahouse and its patrons.

WHERE AND WHEN:
8:00 pm November 27-30 and December 1
Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts at Pace University
3 Spruce Street, New York City
Tickets $40-$50-$60-$100
Box office: (212) 202-0657 and (917) 217-6291
Online ticketing available at www.ivymedia.com/concert
Performed in Mandarin Chinese with both English subtitles and simultaneous English translation through headphones.
REVIEWERS ARE INVITED to all performances.

NEW YORK, October 21 — Yangtze Repertory Theatre of America, together with Columbia Productions, will present the New York debut of Beijing People’s Art Theater, arguably the most famous professional theatre company in China, in the play which is the cornerstone of its repertory, “Teahouse” by Lao She. The production will be November 27 to December 1 at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts at Pace University, 3 Spruce Street, (across the street from City Hall). The play will be performed in Mandarin Chinese with both English subtitles and simultaneous English translation through headphones.

Since its premiere in 1958, “Teahouse” has had more than 500 performances and been seen by more than 500,000 audience members in China, as well as Asia and Europe. This revival is the first to be seen in our country. It is staged by Lin ZhouHua, one of China’s most prominent stage directors, and features a restored version of the original set design.

The piece is one of the most famous dramas by a playwright and novelist who is regarded as one of the literary lights of 20th century China.

This production is the final stop of a U.S. tour that has also included performances to-date at University of California at Berkeley, Houston and Los Angeles. From October 27-29, the production will appear in Washington, DC as part of the Kennedy Center’s Festival of China 2005.

The production is made possible by generous support from Pace University’s Patricia O. Ewers Fund for Multicultural Programming. It is also supported by Dr. and Mrs. Denis Chang, C.B.E, Q.C., and Maryknoll Sisters.

ABOUT THE PLAY
“Chaguan” (Teahouse) is set in a typical, old Beijing teahouse and follows the lives of the owner and his customers through three stages in modern Chinese history, from approximately 1898 to 1948. It brings a cast of over sixty characters together in the Yutai Teahouse to reflect the changes that took place in Chinese society during that tumultuous period.

The play offers snapshots of the seismic forces of modern Chinese history by looking close-up at three key times in the modern era. It opens in 1898, under the Empire, when reformists failed to strengthen the Qing dynasty. Act Two leaps nearly twenty years, to the period after Yuan Shikai’s death, when the warlords, at the instigation of the imperialist powers, set up their separatist regimes and there were continual civil wars. The play ends in 1948, during the intrigues of the Post-WWII civil war.

Lao She saw the teahouse as the nucleus of Chinese society, a place where people from all walks of life came together. The story traces the changing lives of the multitude of characters who regularly frequent the establishment. They range from a manipulative pimp, Liu, and an aging court eunuch, Pang (who buys his wife out of poverty), to the upright and honest teahouse owner, Wang Lifa, and his business companions. As the characters struggle through progressively chaotic historical events, from the end of the Qing dynasty to post-Liberation times, the teahouse serves as a focusing point for the friendship, betrayal, bribery and hardship that besets their lives.

Throughout the play, Wang keeps the establishment open through his heroic savvy and gritty resourcefulness. Worn down by age and oppression, Wang and his friends ambivalently demonstrate the failure of their lives towards the end of the play by a mock funeral, welcoming the new society. The teahouse is requisitioned as a club for the military police and Wang is offered a job as doorman. However, he has already hanged himself.

“Teahouse” is Lao She’s most frequently performed play. The Beijing People’s Art Theatre performed it in 1980 in West Germany and France during the three-hundredth anniversary of the Comédie-Française.

The play was performed by its original cast until 1992. In 1999, a “new generation” of actors was cast and the play was re-directed by Lin ZhouHua.

Director Lin ZhouHua is regarded as “the Mike Nichols of China.” His major works include the modern dramas “Weddings and Funerals,” “Nirvana of Gouerye,” “Bird People,” “Ruan Lingyu,” “Antiques, Tea House, Frameless Wind and Moon, ” “Beijingers,” “Hamlet,” “The Orphan of the Zhao Family,” “Faust,” “Chess People,” “Three Sisters Waiting for Godot,” and “Richard III.” His Peking Opera productions include “Turandot” and “The Humpbacked Prime Minister Liu.”

Translator Ying Ruocheng (English edition) is an actor, director, and translator who was China’s vice-minister of culture (1986-1990). From 1978, with the opening up of China, Ying played an important role in transforming his country’s cultural life, encouraging international exchange and urging creative freedom for writers.

ABOUT THE PLAYWRIGHT
Lao She (1899-1966) – also Lao Shê – pseudonym of Shu Sheyou, original name Shu Qingchun – was a Chinese playwright and author of humorous, satiric novels and short stories. He is perhaps best known for his story, “Rickshaw” (1936), a twentieth-century classic. An unauthorized and bowdlerized English translation, “Rickshaw Boy,” with a happy ending, appeared in 1945 and became a U.S. bestseller.

Lao She was born of Manchu descent in Beijing. His father, who was a guard soldier, died in a street battle during the Boxer uprising. “During my childhood,” he has later said, “I didn’t need to hear stories about evil ogres eating children and so forth; the foreign devils my mother told me about were more barbaric and cruel than any fairy tale ogre with a huge mouth and great fangs. And fairy tales are only fairy tales, whereas my mother’s stories were 100 percent factual, and they directly affected our whole family.” Fatherless since early childhood, Lao She worked his way through Peking Teacher’s College. After graduation he supported himself and his mother through a series of teaching and administrative posts. He served as a principal of an elementary school at the age of 17, and later he was a district supervisor. He spent the years from 1924 to 1929 in London, where he taught Chinese at the School of Oriental and African Studies. By reading amongst other things the novels of Charles Dickens, Lao She improved his English, and decided to start his first novel.

In 1931 Lao She returned to China and continued to write and teach in various universities. “Cat Country” (1933) was a bitter satire about Chinese society. In “Heaven Sent” (1934), partly modeled on Fielding’s Tom Jones, Lao She turned again to humor. He reversed his early individualist theme and stressed the futility of the individual’s struggle against society as a whole. In “Rickshaw Boy,” he traced the degradation and ruin of an industrious Peking rickshaw puller, a peasant drawn to the city. To earn his living, he pulls a rented rickshaw from dawn till dark, enjoys briefly the status of owner-operator, and finally dies on a snowy night. Evan King’s translation published in 1945 invented new characters and changed the ending.

The outbreak of the second Sino-Japanese War (1937-45) radically altered Lao She’s views. Between the years 1937 and 1945 he wrote a number of plays, worked as a propagandist, and headed the All-China Anti-Japanese Writers Federation. After World War II, he published a gigantic novel in three parts, “The Yellow Storm.” It dealt with life in Peking during the Japanese occupation of Manchuria. Between the years 1946 and 1949 Lao She lived in the United States on a cultural grant at the invitation of the Department of State. When the People’s Republic was established in 1949, he returned to China.

Among Lao She’s most famous stories is “Crescent Moon,” written in the early stage of his creative life. It depicts the miserable life of a mother and daughter and their deterioration into prostitution. “I used to picture an ideal life, and it would be like a dream,” the daughter thinks. “But then, as cruel reality again closed in on me, the dream would quickly pass, and I would feel worse than ever. This world is no dream – it’s a living hell.” His fiction was noted for its farcical tone.

Lao She was a member of the Cultural and Educational Committee in the Government Administration Council, a deputy to the National People’s Congress, a member of the Standing Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference, vice-chairman of the All-China Federation of Literature and Art and vice-chairman of the Union of Chinese Writers as well as chairman of the Beijing Federation of Literature and Art. He was named a “People’s Artist” and a “Great Master of Language.” His plays, such as “Dragon Beard Ditch” (1951), became ideologically didactic and did not reach the level of his former work. “Shen Juan,” written in 1960 on the sixtieth anniversary of the Boxer uprising, was a four-act play about the Boxers. Lao She emphasized in it the anti-imperialistic zeal of the Boxers and the burning and killing carried out by the allied powers. His last novel was “The Drum Singers” (1952), which was published only in English. He fell victim to the Red Guards at the outset of the Cultural Revolution and was either murdered or driven to suicide. Since the fall of Chiang Ch’ing, guiding hand of the Cultural Revolution, in 1971, Lao She’s works have been republished.

ABOUT BEIJING PEOPLE’S ART THEATRE
Established June 12, 1952, Beijing People’s Art Theatre (BPAT) is China’s most famous producer of modern realistic drama. The company has won high prestige both within the country and abroad through its diverse repertoire, superb and rigorous stagecraft and its subtle and deep artistic style. It made international headlines in 1983 when Arthur Miller’s “Death of a Salesman” premiered there with the playwright as guest director.

BPAT’s dominant style is realistic modern drama, as embodied by the plays its most famous artistic director, Cao Yu, who is regarded as “the Eugene O’Neill of China.” In its literature, BPAT pays tribute to his leadership, as well as to that of its late General Artistic Director, JiaoJuyin. The company notes that its artists have persevered in the artistic style of realism, but that different art forms are also absorbed and displayed, like “a hundred flowers blooming.” Its “signature” works include “The Tiger Tally” and “Cai Wenji” by Gue Moruo; “Dragon Whiskers Ditch” and “The Teahouse” by Lao She; “Rickshaw Boy,” adapted from Lao She’s novel of the same name; “Thunderstorm,” “The Sunrise,” “Peking Man” and “Wang Zhaojun” by Cao Yu; “Guan Hanquing” and “Death of a Famous Actor” by Tian Han. Other productions include “Warning Signal,” “Weddings and Funerals,” “Xiaojing Zhaojun,” “A Farmer’s Nirvana,” “Top Restaurant,” “Poet Li Bai,” “Galan Hutong,” “Beijing Master,” “Antiques,” “Endless Romance,” “Myriad Twinkling Lights,” “The Zhaos’ Orphan,” and The South Courtyard in the North Lane.”

The theatre has also produced a large number of famous foreign plays: “The Miser,” “Aesop,” “Even the Wise is not Free from Error,” “Measure for Measure,” “The Visit,” “Death of a Salesman,” “The Life of a Woman,” “The Gin Game,” “Amadeus,” “The Caine Mutiny Court Marshall,” “The Seagull” and ‘Wet Paint.” While faithful to the original texts, these productions have also acquired a “distinctive Chinese national nuance.”

Over the past fifty years, BPAT has performed across China and abroad. Plays of its classical repertoire, including “The Teahouse,” have performed in Germany, France, Switzerland, Japan, Canada, Singapore, Korea, Egypt, and Ireland, as well as in Hong Kong, Macao, and Taiwan. The theatre has collaborated with international artists such as Toby Roberson, Arthur Miller, Charlton Heston, Oleg Vevremov, Margaret Booker and Manfred Beilharz.

The company now has three theatres: The Capital Theatre, The Mini Theatre of BPAT and The Experimental Theatre of BPAT. The company’s Stage Art Center makes sets, costumes and props for the company and other performing troupes. In order to carry forward the theatre’s traditions, faithfully record its development and promote innovation of Chinese modem theatre, the Drama Museum of BPAT is under construction.

ABOUT TEAHOUSES
Old-style teahouses such as the one depicted in Lao She’s play continued to thrive throughout the 1950s and early 1960s in Beijing. However, during the (1966-76) Cultural Revolution such places were attacked as bourgeois and an upper-class stigma was attached to the idleness of spending all day drinking tea. Once China opened its doors to the West in the 1980s, young urbanites started to view coffee drinking as a more modern, fashionable pastime. However, after a decade of non-stop modernization, traditional-style teahouses have started to reappear nationwide. In rural areas, teahouses have been set up as small enterprises, and even in the image-conscious cities many Chinese are beginning to rediscover tea culture.

Teahouses today are quite different from the ones in Lao She’s time. Now they are filled only with the quiet buzz of leisurely chat and are devoid of the unsavory characters that once lurked in many a teahouse corner. Entertainment and recreation is determined by locality, as is the custom of drinking tea. In Sichuan, where the practice of tea drinking is thought to have originated, old men sit at long school-desks crammed into small halls often shouting over the opera performances taking place on stage. The waitstaff weave their way between them, pouring water into large tea cups through long-spouted jugs. In Canton, it is customary to hit the fingertips on the table to signify thanks after receiving your tea.

Appropriately enough, one of the first in the renaissance of authentic old-style teahouses to open in Beijing was called the Lao She Teahouse. It came complete with “old Beijing”-style drum players and folk singers. In Fujian and Taiwan, the appreciation of tea or pin cha (lit: imbibing tea), involves more ceremony, and teahouses from these regions have been the most popular in major cities. Oolong tea is sipped from thimble-sized ceramic cups and strained at least twice before drinking.

ABOUT YANGTZE REPERTORY THEATRE OF AMERICA
Yangtze Repertory Theatre of America (www.yangtze-rep-theatre.org) was co-founded by Joanna Chan in 1992 to produce works for and by Asian artists. It has since become New York’s most significant entry point for dramatic works from Chinese-speaking countries and a place of collaboration for artists from various parts of Asia. Yangtze and its artistic director have been responsible for the New York debuts of many notable artists, including Wang LuoYung, who appeared in the leading role in “Miss Saigon” on Broadway, and Dr. Wang XiaoYing, Deputy Director of China’s National Theater in Beijing. In 1997, Gao Xingjian, the 2000 Nobel Laureate in Literature, was brought to NY by Yangtze Rep to direct his own play, “Between Life and Death,” at Theater for the New City and to present a showing of his ink paintings at Schimmel Center for the Arts, Pace University. These events remain the only full-scale presentations of works by Gao in the US to-date.

Yangtze Rep has produced NYC productions of three major plays of Cao Yu, “The Sun Shall Rise,” “Thunderstorm” and “The Wilderness.” Cao Yu was founding director of Beijing People’s Art Theatre and is regarded as “the Eugene O’Neill of China.”

Plays which attempt to dramatize forces of Chinese history have been Yangtze Rep’s emphasis over the years. “The Life and Times of Ng Chung-Yin” (NY premiere 1998) was a controversial portrait of a journalist/activist. Joanna Chan’s bilingual drama, “The Story of Yu-Huan” (world premiere 1998), dealt with the celebrated beauty (708-746 AD) whose hanging death exposing the injustices of a society not governed by law. “The Eternal Game” (NY premiere 1996) by Wang Wei-zhong (of Tienjin) was a political allegory on brilliant men of integrity who serve under lesser ones. Joanna Chan’s “The Soongs: By Dreams Betrayed,” which caused an uproar in the Chinese communities in 1992, examined the collective responsibility of the populace in the rise of tyranny, the myth-making machinery of modern media, and the delusions of the missionary movement and U.S. foreign policy. It was one of the 18 most significant original works chosen for scholarly critique in the worldwide symposium, “Chinese Language Theater: A Ten-Year Retrospective,” held in Hong Kong in July 2004 with a gathering of stage directors, playwrights and scholars from different parts of China, Taiwan, Macau, Hong Kong, Singapore, Japan, England and the U.S.

Yangtze mounted “OneFamilyOneChildOneDoor,” written and directed by Joanna Chan, at the Bank Street Theater, in 2001 during the dark days following the 9/11 attacks. The play, a dark comedy on the human costs of China’s one-child policy, which was one of the two finalists in the Jane Chambers Playwriting Contest in 2002, became so popular that it has been revived twice, in 2002 and 2003.

Yangtze Rep has been funded by the New York State Council on the Arts (since 1994), the Alliance of Resident Theaters/New York (since 1995), the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (since 1999), New York City Department of Cultural Affairs (since 1997) and the Asian American Arts Alliance (in 1998). It received a special development grant for emerging artists from the New York State Council on the Arts (1995).

Absurd, funny comedy of teenager with rapidly aging body to be presented by Hudson Stage Company

Westchester’s premiere professional theatre now in residence on Pace University’s Briarcliff campus at Woodward Hall Theatre, is proud to present
the Fall Mainstage production: the Westchester premiere of David Lindsay Abaire’s hilarious, heartrending and haunting play KIMBERLY AKIMBO, directed by Richard Caliban. The absurdly funny story of a teenage girl whose body ages four times faster than those around her.

The following release comes from the theater company in residence on Pace University’s Briarcliff campus:

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Press Contact: Denise Bessette, Producer 914-736-3467; hudsonstage@aol.com

HUDSON STAGE COMPANY, The following release comes from the theater company in residence on Pace University’s Briarcliff campus:

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Press Contact: Denise Bessette, Producer 914-736-3467; hudsonstage@aol.com

HUDSON STAGE COMPANY, Westchester’s premiere professional theatre now in residence on Pace University’s Briarcliff campus at Woodward Hall Theatre, is proud to present
the Fall Mainstage production: the Westchester premiere of David Lindsay Abaire’s hilarious, heartrending and haunting play KIMBERLY AKIMBO, directed by Richard Caliban. The absurdly funny story of a teenage girl whose body ages four times faster than those around her.
“There have been many dark comedies about dysfunctional famillies, but this is one of the funniest.” LA Times.

Abaire is the noted writer of FUDDY MEERS, and WONDER OF THE WORLD and Caliban was the founder of NYC’s famed LaCucaracha Theatre, most recently directing DONNA MORELLI at New York Stage and Film, Vassar.
The powerhouse cast includes Anne O’Sullivan as 16-going-on-60 Kimberly, John Wojda and Jillian LaVinka as her parents who have dragged her to Bogota NJ, Denise Bessette as her ex-con aunt and Aaron Wilton as her geeky school friend.
Producers Denise Bessette, Dan Foster and Olivia Sklar are happy to be working with a first-rate team that includes set designer Dustin O’Neill, lighting designer Andrew Gmoser, costume designer Edi Giguere, sound designer Jon Kadela, Misha Siegel-Rivers as Production Stage Manager, and Alex Scheer as her assistant stage manager.

KIMBERLY AKIMBO: Opens Friday, October 28th and runs three consecutive weekends through Saturday, November 12th. Fridays. Saturdays at 8pm, Two Sunday matinees at 3pm, 10/30 and 11/6 with a Q&A following the 11/6 performance.

$25.00 for general admission, $20.00 seniors/students. Pace: $15.00. Group rates available.
TICKETS at 914-271-2811, or at www.hudsonstage.com. Directions on website.
Woodward Hall Theatre, Pace University Briarcliff Campus, 235 Elm Street, Briarcliff Manor, NY.

This production is made possible by the generosity of Westchester Arts Council and Pace University. Producers are solely responsible for content.
“There have been many dark comedies about dysfunctional famillies, but this is one of the funniest.” LA Times.

Abaire is the noted writer of FUDDY MEERS, and WONDER OF THE WORLD and Caliban was the founder of NYC’s famed LaCucaracha Theatre, most recently directing DONNA MORELLI at New York Stage and Film, Vassar.
The powerhouse cast includes Anne O’Sullivan as 16-going-on-60 Kimberly, John Wojda and Jillian LaVinka as her parents who have dragged her to Bogota NJ, Denise Bessette as her ex-con aunt and Aaron Wilton as her geeky school friend.
Producers Denise Bessette, Dan Foster and Olivia Sklar are happy to be working with a first-rate team that includes set designer Dustin O’Neill, lighting designer Andrew Gmoser, costume designer Edi Giguere, sound designer Jon Kadela, Misha Siegel-Rivers as Production Stage Manager, and Alex Scheer as her assistant stage manager.

KIMBERLY AKIMBO: Opens Friday, October 28th and runs three consecutive weekends through Saturday, November 12th. Fridays. Saturdays at 8pm, Two Sunday matinees at 3pm, 10/30 and 11/6 with a Q&A following the 11/6 performance.

$25.00 for general admission, $20.00 seniors/students. Pace: $15.00. Group rates available.
TICKETS at 914-271-2811, or at www.hudsonstage.com. Directions on website.
Woodward Hall Theatre, Pace University Briarcliff Campus, 235 Elm Street, Briarcliff Manor, NY.

This production is made possible by the generosity of Westchester Arts Council and Pace University. Producers are solely responsible for content.

Beijing People’s Art Theater Announcement

Details of the culmination of the Beijing People’s Arts Theater’s first U.S. tour, which begins this month at Washington’s Kennedy Center and ends at the Michael Schimmel Center. From November 27 to December 1 the company will present its signature “drama theater” work, Lao She’s “The Teahouse.”

Contact
Rosemary Mercedes, Pace University
212 346-1637, cell 914-424-3845 rmercedes@pace.edu
or Chris Cory, Pace University
212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164. ccory@pace.edu

ADVISORY

ANNOUNCEMENT OF NEW YORK PREMIERE OF
BEIJING PEOPLE’S ART THEATER

WHEN: This Friday, October 7, 12:30 PM.

WHERE: Lobby of Pace University’s Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, 31 Spruce St. (across from City Hall, between Park Row and Gold Street)

WHO: the co-presenters:
— Joanna Chan, founder, and Scott Shi, executive director of the Yangtse Repertory Theatre, a New York City-based theater and dance company which is co-presenting the event with Pace University
— David Watson, Pace University Director of Cultural Affairs

WHAT: Details of the culmination of the Beijing People’s Arts Theater’s first U.S. tour, which begins this month at Washington’s Kennedy Center and ends at the Michael Schimmel Center. From November 27 to December 1 the company will present its signature “drama theater” work, Lao She’s “The Teahouse.”

Chinese food will be served.

The Beijing People’s Art Theatre enjoys a distinguished worldwide reputation derived from its more than 12,500 performances of 250 plays over half a century. This tour is its first in the U.S.

Celebrating its 100th anniversary in 2006, Pace is a private university in the New York Metropolitan area with a growing national reputation for offering students international perspectives, opportunity, teaching and learning based on research, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. It is one of the ten founders of Project Pericles, developing education that encourages lifelong participation in democratic processes. Pace has seven campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. Approximately 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, and School of Law. www.pace.edu

Hudson Stage Company Becomes Artist in Residence

The Hudson Stage Company, the adventurous professional theater company that has performed in a variety of Westchester venues during its first six years, is becoming an Artist-In-Residence at the Briarcliff annex to Pace University’s Pleasantville campus.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contacts:
Cara Halstead, Public Information Officer, Pace University (914) 773-3312, chalstead@pace.edu
or
Denise Bessette, Producer, Hudson Stage Company (914) 736-3467, DBess25@aol.com

HUDSON STAGE COMPANY BECOMES ARTIST IN RESIDENCE
AT PACE UNIVERSITY BRIARCLIFF CAMPUS

Professional theater group with growing reputation
for NY and world premieres
begins performances and staged readings,
will offer pre-professional opportunities for students

PLEASANTVILLE, NY – February 7, 2005. The Hudson Stage Company, the adventurous professional theater company that has performed in a variety of Westchester venues during its first six years, is becoming an Artist-In-Residence at the Briarcliff annex to Pace University’s Pleasantville campus.

The next events of the company’s weekend performances at its new home begin with the February 11 staged reading of “Massage in Progress,” by Westchester playwright Jeannie Zusy. They continue the first three weekends in April with the world premiere of Eric Henry Sanders’ new play, “Where’s Annie?”

Hudson Stage performs under an Actors’ Equity Association Small Professional Theatre contract. It has been hailed by The New York Times, the Journal News, Westchester Magazine and the North County News for its ambitious commitment to producing original new plays.

Influence of Tony Randall. “We are delighted to welcome Hudson Stage Company to Pace’s Westchester campuses,” said Pace University President David A. Caputo. “A permanent home will help Hudson Stage bring Westchester more challenging, contemporary theatre. This arrangement mirrors our relationship at Pace’s downtown New York City campus with the National Actors Theatre, founded by the late Tony Randall. We welcome the opportunity for our students to participate in the work of a professional theatre company and master classes as well as enrichment for all students, especially those in the arts and humanities.”

Praised by the New York Times for “sweeping gallantry of purpose,” since its founding in 1999 Hudson Stage Company has performed at venues including public libraries, the Jacob Burns Film Center and the Julie Harris Theatre at the Clearview School in Briarcliff Manor.

“This new venue and relationship offer tremendous opportunities for everyone involved, and we are thrilled to be here,” said Denise Bessette, one of the Hudson Stage Company’s three producers, along with Dan Foster and Olivia Sklar. “We are appreciative of Pace’s commitment to the arts and to our company.”

Hudson Stage Company productions will take place in a 135-seat theater in Pace’s Woodward Hall located on Elm Road in Briarcliff Manor. Said Bessette: “The theater has terrific acoustics and sight-lines, comfortable seats, and is very audience-friendly. The campus is easily accessible from the Taconic Parkway and Route 9A, and the villages of Briarcliff and Pleasantville offer many dining options for the public.” Because many Pace staff offices are closed on weekends, free parking is available on campus, including facilities for people with handicaps.

World premiere of “Where’s Annie” April 1 through April 17. On the first three weekends in April, the Company presents the world premiere of Eric Henry Sanders’ new play, “Where’s Annie?,” which Bessette describes as “a divinely dark comedy with an American Gothic spin.” It will be directed by Steven Williford.

The production plays Fridays and Saturdays at 8pm and Sundays at 3pm, with additional matinees on Friday, April 8th and 15th at 3pm. $25 general admission, $20 for seniors/students, $15 for PACE with ID. Group rates are available.

“On Golden Pond” meets “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” in this play that explores the mystery of an older couple’s relationship with each other and their vengeful granddaughter. “There’s a wickedly sensual sense of humor between this couple that is refreshingly different from the ‘cute’ or ‘curmudgeonly’ characters audiences usually see depicting older people,” Bessette said.

Playwright Sanders teaches screenwriting at Hampshire College, and his work has been seen across the country at venues including the Cherry Lane Alternative in NYC, Victory Gardens in Chicago and in LA at the Road Theatre. Williford has been at the helm of the Lark Theatre in NYC, and has worked Off-Broadway at Manhattan Theatre Club, Ensemble Studio, and Rattlestick, regionally at Long Wharf Theatre, and as a contract director of the long-running soaps “As the World Turns” and “The Guiding Light.”

These programs are made possible by a grant from the Westchester Arts Council and the donation of facilities by Pace University. HSC is solely responsible for program content.

More information is at the HSC hotline at 914-271-2811 and website, at www.hudsonstage.com. Information on HSC events at Pace University and other Pace events can be found, along with directions to Pace, at www.Pace.edu/culture. For automated directions to Pace, call 914-773-3737.