NEWS ADVISORY: Get Palestinian and Israeli Youths to Talk?

Emily Welty, PhD, international author and Pace University professor, and Jacob Toll, Board member of the Seeds of Peace Organization have done it. They are two of six distinguished panelists presenting on a panel entitled “Engaging Youths & Community in Dialogue: Our Roles in Cultivating Global Peace?” at this year’s Left Forum at Pace University Saturday afternoon, March 19, from 2 to 4:30 at Pace University’s downtown Manhattan campus (entrance on Spruce St. just East of City Hall).

PANEL DISCUSSION

“Engaging Youths and Community in Dialogue: Our Roles in Cultivating Global Peace?”

Schedule: G. Panel Session 3 – Saturday March 19,  3pm – 4:50 pm

NEW YORK, NY, March 18, 2011 — It pays to listen to anyone who can get Palestinian and Israeli youths to engage in peaceful dialogue.

Emily Welty, PhD,  international author and Pace University professor, and Jacob Toll, board member of the Seeds of Peace Organization have done it. They are two of six panelists presenting “Engaging Youths and Community in Dialogue: Our Roles in Cultivating Global Peace?” at this year’s Left Forum at Pace University Saturday afternoon, March 19, from 2 to 5pm at Pace University’s downtown Manhattan campus (entrance on Spruce St. just East of City Hall).

The panel includes educators and activists who have researched, studied and experimented with models of dialogue that show great promise in real world settings. The moderator, Rev. Deborah Moldow, is the United Nations representative for an NGO, the World Peace Prayer Society, and a co-founder, of Campus Peace Centers.

Even if they are concerned with global peace, many of today’s youths and educators have been inadequately prepared to transcend polarization along racial, religious and class or economically disparate lines, organizers say. One panelist who has addressed this issue is Frances Delahanty, PhD, an associate professor of psychology at Pace University, and founder-chair of a peace and justice advisory board at the institution.

Drawing on their real world and academic experiences, panelists will showcase conceptual and practical models of how to nurture cutting edge dialoging that reconciles conflicts . One such model with potential for defusing disagreements is “Non-violent Communication” to be presented by Ida Dupont, PhD, associate professor of criminal justice and human services at Pace.

All of the panelists are deeply concerned with cutting through today’s politicized, sound-bite culture in order to educate youths to successfully navigate and negotiate in an at-risk global community. Administrators at Pace believe one panelist, Lorendra Pinder, an honor student and president of the campus Stonewall Coalition, is making a difference among her peers; she has been a prime mover in the Model UN Program at Pace University.

The panel has been organized by Leonard Burg project and operations coordinator in the Pace University Division for Student Success.  The division, led by a new Associate Provost for Student Success, Mark Allen Poisel, PhD, is concerned with crafting intentional pathways to graduation, especially for at-risk youths in danger of attrition. The panel features diverse multi-campus staff, faculty, students and community activists working together to achieve these aims.

The Left Forum bills itself as “the largest annual conference of left and progressive intellectuals, activists, academics, and the interested public in the U.S”.  This year it is featuring over 700 speakers, thousands of participants and 300 panels, during the three-day conference. Plenary speakers include Cornel West, culture critic and Distinguished Professor at Princeton University, and Barbara Ehrenreich, Author of “Nickel and Dimed.”

Conference Fee: rates from $20 to $60 for from 1 to 3 days. To REGISTER NOW find out more information at leftforum.org, left forum on Facebook, left forum on Twitter, leftforum@leftforum.org or call (212) 817-2002/2003.

For information about the Engaging Youths panel, contact Leonard Burg at (212) 346-1579 or Lburg@pace.edu. Cell 917-941-7099

Upcoming Lectures on Peace, Justice and Sustainability at Pace in Pleasantville

The following events will take place this fall at the Pleasantville campus of Pace. The events are free and open to the Pace community and the public.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact:
Cara Halstead Cea, Public Information,
Pace University, 914-773-3312 (Office), 914-906-9680 (Cell) chalstead@pace.edu

UPCOMING LECTURES ON PEACE, JUSTICE AND SUSTAINABLITY AT PACE IN PLEASANTVILLE

The following events will take place this fall at the Pleasantville campus of Pace. The events are free and open to the Pace community and the public.

November 5, 12:20 P.M. Gottesman. “Voices from Darfur”

Nov. 6, 1:30-3:25, NB in Butcher Suite Judith Anderson, MBA, entrepreneur, business coach, and member of BPeace (Business Council for Peace) will speak on “Making a Difference in Afghanistan” – describing her trips to Afghanistan with B Peace, and organization which supports women in Afghanistan and Rwanda in starting their own businesses and becoming leaders for peace in their own communities.

Nov. 8, 1:30–3:25, Miller 33. Mr. Narinder Kakar, of the University for Peace in Costa Rica, and now coordinator of all the NGO’s dealing with sustainable development – will speak on the connection between conservation, sustainable development, and peace.

Nov. 15, 1:30 -3:25, Miller 33. John Crockett, developer of sustainable business around odorless composting of organic food scraps. John has pioneered a totally new technology for composting that is odor-free and produces organic compost which doubles the size of plants fed by this compost. He will speak about the new technology he has developed and the various environmental benefits that accrue from it.

Nov. 29, 1:30-3:25, Miller 33. Mary Kay Jou, MS, Social Work, and AVP trainer (Alternatives to Violence Program), who will speak about her trips to Rwanda and the Congo, doing Alternatives to Violence Programs there with people from both the Hutu and Tutsi tribes helping them to heal and forgive, after their tragic civic war.

Dec. 3, 1:30-3:25, Miller 33. Sue Maxam, MA, Director of the Center for Academic Excellence at Pace Pleasantville, will speak on the topic, Peace and Poverty, sharing her trips to South America and Africa doing social service projects supporting peoples in these regions.

Dec. 5, 1:30-3:25, Miller 33. Dr. Charlene Hoegler, Biology Dept. Pace Pleasantville, will speak about the relationship between science and environmental sustainability.

Pace announces “Not On Our Watch” to intensify anti-hatred values

Pace University President David A. Caputo today announced a new initiative, “Not On Our Watch,” to intensify the University’s extensive efforts to combat intolerance and hatred and promote understanding and acceptance of diverse groups.

Contact: Christopher Cory, Executive Director of Public Information
917-608-8164 (cell), ccory@pace.edu (email via blackberry)

Pace University statement announcing
“Not on Our Watch” anti-hate campaign

Thursday, October 19, 2006

Pace University President David A. Caputo today announced a new initiative, “Not On Our Watch,” to intensify the University’s extensive efforts to combat intolerance and hatred and promote understanding and acceptance of diverse groups. He said:

“Since several recent hate crime incidents, Pace University has aggressively reached out to our many student organizations and campus councils that are concerned with promoting acceptance and combating intolerance. All of them are responding with deep concern and constructive suggestions.

“We also have contacted outside organizations, and I welcome the offers of cooperation we have received from the New York office of the Council on American Islamic Relations, the Anti Defamation League, and the US Department of Justice.

“The hateful acts against our community are rare in the history of this university, but they are intolerable acts against individuals and groups of individuals who are valued, respected and welcome members of our university community, and they are attacks against the very foundation of the University itself.

“I have asked all faculty and staff members and students to unequivocally condemn these actions and reach out to all members of our community with understanding, acceptance and compassion.

“I also announced a fresh anti-hate effort, building on our long tradition of campus activities against intolerance and for understanding and acceptance. This is being led by our Affirmative Action Officer, Lisa Miles JD. Since Monday this team has requested or held consultations and meetings with
• The New York office of the Council on American Islamic Relations
• the Anti Defamation League
• the US Department of Justice
• The Pace University President’s Commission on Diversity
• Pace Faculty Councils Downtown and in Westchester
• Administrative Councils (staff councils) Downtown and in Westchester
• Student clubs concerned with multiculturalism, gender and sexual orientation
• Separate meeting with Muslim Students Association
• Meeting of Downtown Campus student government and student club officers (Westchester Campus leaders meeting scheduled for Friday, 10/20)
• Pace Coalition for Diversity (15-year old Downtown Campus group)
• Pace Westchester Diversity Team (Westchester equivalent of Coalition for Diversity)

“Not on Our Watch”

“Based on the input so far, this team has approved plans for an intensified program to be called ‘Not on Our Watch.’ It includes
• Sensitivity training for students and the President’s Council of senior university administrators (planning and execution will involve CAIR, the Pace Muslim Students Association and many other the diversity groups on our campuses)
• First-responder training on proper protocols for incidents of bias by the Regional Director of Community Relations Services for the US Department of Justice (Reinaldo Rivera) for security officers and a broader team that will respond to bias incidents.
• Public forums on our New York City and Westchester campuses with panelists, Q&A, and open mikes, probably during week of Nov 6th.
• Distribution of a wallet card listing phone numbers for the University Safety and Security Department, Deans for Students, Residential Life, Counseling center, Health care center, Affirmative Action Office and Ombuds Office. This responds to input from students who said they weren’t sure who to call in emergencies.

“This was a surprise to us because incidents of intolerance are extremely rare here. But it indicates a set of issues we have to deal with and gives us a moment to act when we have people’s attention. Longer range programming is also being planned. — we are intensifying an ongoing, sustained effort.

“Pace does not pretend intolerance doesn’t exist. We are facing these incidents with the utmost concern, squarely and in public.

“Our tradition is to support students who are affected by intolerance, giving them systems for figuring out what they want to do about it and nurturing them through the process. These range from individual counseling to mentoring student groups to faculty encouragement to study social issues.

“When an internal survey in 2003-2004 asked students to say if they agreed or disagreed with the statement “I feel I need to hide some characteristics of my racial and ethnic culture in order to fit in at Pace,” only 11 percent of both undergraduate and graduate students agreed.

“Pace deplores as hateful incidents of bias of whatever kind. Bias is not only an attack on people, but on the fundamental nature of a University and people’s ability to learn from one another.

“While the investigation continues, and afterward, we welcome information and constructive ideas.

“Anyone with information that might be relevant to the investigation of these incidents should call the NYPD Hate Crimes unit

“Suggestions about anti-bias activities should go to Lisa Miles, e-mail lmiles@pace.edu or call 212-346-1310.”

Facts about Pace University anti-bias activities:

Pace is actively involved in the fight against hatred and intolerance, and in promoting understanding and acceptance. Our current efforts build on a long and deep tradition of community service and multicultural awareness programs. These are scheduled year after year by both the University and student groups, and many of this year’s events were scheduled well before these incidents.

In any given year our student organizations are likely to include those formed by students whose backgrounds reflect many ethnicities as well as organizations for women and students who are Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, InterQueer and Questioning.

During the University’s Centennial in calendar 2006 the Centennial Committee alone presented or co-sponsored Freeman Hrabowski, president of the University of Maryland/Baltimore County, on attracting minority group members to higher education and science; a two-day symposium on the legacies of slavery and feminism in the works of fugitive slave Harriet Jacobs ( author of “Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl: Written by Herself”); Maya Angelou; and a multinational colloquium of law professors from 44 first, second and third-world countries on enforcing global environmental laws.

Other current and past programs include forums on Palestine and Zionism, AIDS, American Indians, Hispanic multilingual cartoons, and SAFEZONE training to increase tolerance for different sexual orientations.

Community service is now a required component of the core curriculum.

The University is a founder of Project Pericles, a coalition of colleges explicitly committed to encouraging lifelong engagement by citizens in democratic processes.

Correction

The times for the two hour teach-ins in the release about Pace University’s on-campus campaign against hate, sent earlier today, are incorrect.

The times for the two hour teach-ins in the release about Pace University’s on-campus campaign against hate, sent earlier today, are incorrect.

The teach-in on the Westchester campus in Pleasantville on Tuesday, November 28 is from 1 to 3 PM.

The teach-in on the downtown New York City campus on Thursday, November 30, is from 3 to 5 pm.

On-Campus Campaign Against Hate, Promoting Respect and Understanding

In the wake of incidents in which two copies of the Qur’an were found in toilets and other racial and ethnic slurs were found on its campuses, Pace University today announced the start of a campaign to intensify its traditional acceptance of all groups on camps regardless of religion, race, ethnicity or gender orientation.

Contact
Christopher T. Cory, Executive Director, Public Information, Pace University
212-346-1117, ccory@pace.edu, cell 917-608-8164

Note: Most sessions are open to media with press credentials. Please contact the Public Information office for details.

PACE UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCES ON-CAMPUS CAMPAIGN
AGAINST HATE, PROMOTING RESPECT AND UNDERSTANDING

“Not on My Watch” goal is to “encourage all of us to take responsibility,”
says President David A. Caputo

New York, NY and Pleasantville, NY, November 14, 2006 – In the wake of incidents in which two copies of the Qur’an were found in toilets and other racial and ethnic slurs were found on its campuses, Pace University today announced the start of a campaign to intensify its traditional acceptance of all groups on camps regardless of religion, race, ethnicity or gender orientation.

The incidents are under police investigation as hate crimes. President David A. Caputo, called the campaign “comprehensive and pro-active.”

The effort is known as “Not on My Watch.” Caputo said the name stresses the need for active cooperation from each member of the community, in actions ranging from understanding others to reporting incidents. “The goal is to encourage all of us to take responsibility,” he said.

In its first few weeks, “Not on My Watch” will comprise
• A three- hour panel discussion on sacred texts in all religions, including the Bible and the Qur’an, on November 20 in Lecture Hall North, One Pace Plaza, from 6 to 9 p.m. Taught by faculty members in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, the discussion will explore: What is a sacred text?; How does reading a sacred text differ from reading a secular text?; What – if any – responsibilities do we have to texts that other people hold sacred?; Is it possible to desecrate a sacred text?

• Two hour teach-ins on the Westchester campus in Pleasantville Tuesday, November 28, from 1 to 3 pm, and on the downtown New York City campus Thursday, November 30, from 3 to 5 pm. A faculty panel will discuss the meaning of hate crimes and the impact that they have on the community. In addition, the sessions will provide an open forum for dialogue about the recent incidents and an opportunity for questions about different cultures, groups, or practices. Information on Islam has been developed in consultation with the Conference on American Islamic Relations.

• “Campus of Difference,” a program developed and facilitated by the Anti Defamation League, offered over the next few weeks to Resident Assistants and student leaders.

• “Faculty tip sheets” developed by the University’s counseling department for faculty members willing to lead class discussions.

• Circulation of a resolution condemning hate and intolerance passed by the Student Government Association on the Downtown Manhattan campus.

• Distribution of a wallet card listing emergency phone numbers for the University Safety and Security Department, Deans for Students, Residential Life, Counseling center, Health care center, Affirmative Action Office and Ombuds Office. This responds to input from students who said they weren’t sure who to call.

• A training initiative that started at the top November 8 with a 90-minute cultural awareness workshop for the 30 members of the President’s Council (senior administrators and deans of students and of the University’s six schools). Conducted by the regional director of the US Justice Department’s Community Relations Service, it explored the roots of disrespect, its painful impact, and protocols for reinforcing tolerance and acceptance and dealing with specific incidents.

• Training sessions for first responders including the campus security staff, to update them on procedures for dealing with victims and collecting evidence.

Longer-term activities are under development as well. A team of faculty and staff members working on internationalizing the curriculum as an “Internationalization Laboratory” of the American Council on Education this week agreed to explore new curriculum units on religious, racial, ethnic, gender, class, and geo-political differences. The goal, as one member put it: “to lead our students to new levels of respect and understanding.”

Reinforcing norms. The effort was developed under the leadership of Lisa Miles JD, the University’s Affirmative Action Officer.

On campus surveys show acceptance of others is a widespread norm at Pace. When an internal survey in 2003-2004 asked students to say if they agreed or disagreed that “I feel I need to hide some characteristics of my racial and ethnic culture in order to fit in at Pace,” only 10 percent of both undergraduate and graduate students agreed.

More recently, the National Survey of Student Engagement found Pace students above national norms in reporting that they have serious conversations with fellow students of a different race or ethnicity.

In planning “Not on My Watch,” Miles has sought buy-in from a broad range of campus organizations including the Pace University President’s Commission on Diversity; faculty councils in Downtown New York City and Westchester; councils of administrators and staff members; the Pace Coalition for Diversity, a 15-year old organization on the Downtown campus, and its Westchester equivalent, the Pace Westchester Diversity Team; student clubs concerned with multiculturalism, gender and sexual orientation including the Muslim Students Association, and the officers of other student clubs and the student governments.

“Pace does not pretend intolerance doesn’t exist,” said Miles. “It has not attempted to cover up these incidents and has faced them with the utmost concern, starting with the President’s messages to everyone on campus.”

Supporting students. She added that Pace’s practice is to support students who are affected by intolerance, giving them systems for figuring out what they want to do about it and nurturing them through the process. These range from individual counseling to mentoring student advocacy groups to faculty encouragement to study social issues.

“Not on My Watch” builds on pluralism at Pace that stretches back to its founding 100 years ago when it welcomed women to classes in accounting, then an all-male field. The University’s 13,500 students are 40% Caucasian, 8% Hispanic, 8% Asian/Pacific Islander, 9% African American, 6% International and 29% other/unidentified.

Pace Students Sell $1.00 “Nails in the Coffin of War”

Purchasers symbolically “Hammer the Final Nail in the Coffin of War.” The student-organized activity is part of the campus’s second annual “Peace Week.”

Contacts:
Erica Feldherr, Pace ’05, Co-Chair, Peace Week, cell 646-734-1264. schna21@aol.com
Chris Cory, Executive Director of Public Information, Pace University
212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

“NAILS IN THE COFFIN OF WAR”
BEING SOLD FOR $1.00 IN THREE-DAY STUDENT DEMONSTATION
AT PACE UNIVERSITY PLEASANTVILLE (NY) CAMPUS

WHAT: Sale of nails for $1 each, which buyers are invited to drive into a pine coffin displayed in the student center at Pace University’s campus in Pleasantville, NY, north of New York City. Purchasers symbolically “Hammer the Final Nail in the Coffin of War.” The student-organized activity is part of the campus’s second annual “Peace Week.”

The coffin is surrounded by a 120-foot display of posters on which are mounted brief Associated Press biographies of the 1200 U.S. soldiers who have died in the recent Iraq war and of the 146 who have died in Afghanistan.

“We are honoring them — the biggest honor that can be paid to them is to create peace.”
– Paul Londrigan, junior political science major from Mt. Kisco, NY and co-chair of “Peace Week”

As far as the organizers know, this symbolic activity has not previously been used in peace advocacy.

WHEN: Monday, November 29 through Wednesday, December 1, 10 AM-9 PM.

WHERE: Pace University, Kessel Campus Center, 861 Bedford Road, Pleasantville, NY. Directions to campus at page.cfm?doc_id=154

BREADTH OF SUPPORT: Peace week is co-sponsored by the Pleasantville Campus’s Model UN team, the Pi Gamma Mu honor society, and the N.A.T.U.R.E. student environmental organization, along with the academic programs in Political Science, Women’s Studies and Criminal Justice, the University’s Office of Student Development and Campus Activities, and the University’s office of Project Pericles, a national consortium of colleges and universities that work to encourage lifelong interest in using democratic processes for change. The project originated in a class, “Workshop on Citizen Advocacy,” taught by political scientist Gregory Julian.

What Would Peace Between Washington and Al Qaeda Look Like?

“What Would Peace between Washington and Al Qaeda Look Like?: Some Points for the Presidential Candidates to Consider,” a lecture co-sponsored by Pace University’s School of Computer Science and Information Systems and Pace’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences.

Contact: Louise Kleinbaum, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, Pace University, 914-422-4191, lkleinbaum@pace.edu, or Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY
September 8, 2004

“WHAT WOULD PEACE BETWEEN WASHINGTON AND AL QAEDA
LOOK LIKE?”

“Some points for the presidential candidates to consider” to be raised in
September 11 talk at Pace University downtown campus
by founder of academic peace studies Johan Galtung

WHAT: “What Would Peace between Washington and Al Qaeda Look Like?: Some Points for the Presidential Candidates to Consider,” a lecture co-sponsored by Pace University’s School of Computer Science and Information Systems and Pace’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences.

WHO: Johan Galtung is director of TRANSCEND: a Peace and Development Network. Galtung, widely regarded as the founder of the academic discipline of peace research, is author of over one thousand articles and 123 books, most recently “Transcend and Transform: An Introduction to Conflict Work.” Over the last fifty years, he has mediated in more than fifty international conflicts.

WHEN: Saturday, September 11, 2004, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. (one-hour lecture followed by discussion).

WHERE: Pace University’s Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, Lobby, 3 Spruce Street, between Park Row and Gold Street (across from City Hall), New York City.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university committed to opportunity, teaching and learning, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. It is one of the ten founders of Project Pericles, developing education that encourages lifelong participation in democratic processes. Pace has seven campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and the law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. Approximately 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu

Open Campus Forum: Promoting Peace

The forum is an open discussion sponsored by Dyson College of Arts & Sciences departments of Criminal Justice, Sociology, History, Human Services, Economics, Psychology, Political Science and the Model U. N. Team.

MEDIA ADVISORY

WHAT: Dyson College of Arts & Sciences presents an open forum:

Promoting Peace:
A multi-disciplinary perspective for a multi-cultural world

WHEN: Wednesday, March 5, 12:20-1:15 p.m.
(Note – connection is unknown at this time to other national peace events
on campuses planned for March 5)

WHERE: Pace University, 861 Bedford Road, Pleasantville.
Dining Room A

SPECIAL EXPERT EMPHASIS: The United Nations, Middle Eastern History, Economics, Human Rights and Non-Violent Resolutions.

WHO:
Professor Greg Julian teaches American government and international affairs and is the mentor of the award winning Model U. N. team and the Fulbright Student Scholars Program. He is also active in community politics, serving as New York State Democratic Committeeperson 94 A. D.

Ghassan Karam, adjunct assistant professor of economics, teaches International Economy, Political Economy of the Middle East and Environmental Economics. Professor Karam received his BA in economics at the American University of Beirut, Lebanon. He is the co-author and data analyst of The Arab Middle East: What’s Next?

Clinical/counseling psychologist and associate professor of psychology, Fran Delahanty is a communication and conflict resolution expert. She is also a certified trainer with the volunteer program Alternatives to Violence.

Reza Afshari, professor of history and human rights, has just published the book, Human Rights in Iran: Islamist Politics and the Abuse of Cultural Relativism, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2001. He is also a member of the Middle East Studies Association of America, Committee for Academic Freedom in the Middle East and North Africa.

The forum is an open discussion sponsored by Dyson College of Arts & Sciences departments of Criminal Justice, Sociology, History, Human Services, Economics, Psychology, Political Science and the Model U. N. Team.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart Airport in New Windsor. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu

Oklahoma City Students visit Pace

Four students from Pace University in New York City will be joined by four students (three from the University of Central Oklahoma in Oklahoma City and one from Western Oklahoma State in Altus Oklahoma), to explore “Antiterrorism.” Over a three day period they will be joined by Pace faculty and Pace community at seminars pertaining to this issue.

Students from Pace University (NYC) and Oklahoma City share their experiences, visit Ground Zero together and look for answers to questions of terrorism.

WHO: Four students from Pace University in New York City will be joined by four students (three from the University of Central Oklahoma in Oklahoma City and one from Western Oklahoma State in Altus Oklahoma), to explore “Antiterrorism.” Over a three day period they will be joined by Pace faculty and Pace community at seminars pertaining to this issue.

WHAT: Students from Pace University and Oklahoma City universities look for answers to questions of terrorism.

WHY: Terrorism threatens a society by instilling fear and a feeling of helplessness. Out of fear of destruction and harm it is possible to hold a society or government hostage.

WHEN:
Monday, March 18
1:30 p.m. Students from Oklahoma arrive
2:30 p.m. Tour of downtown New York
4:30 p.m. Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) to address students

Tuesday, March 19
9:30 a.m. Tour of Ground Zero (no media)
11:00 a.m. Panel: “Sharing experiences: Oklahoma City Bombing and New York City Terrorist Attack of 9-11.”
Moderator: Herbert Krauss, Chair of the Psychology Department (Dyson)
1:00 p.m. Lunch
2:00 p.m. Panel: “Terrorism: Business and Economic Perspectives”
Moderator: Eric Kessler, Lubin School of Business;
MarkWeinstock (Dyson); James Russell, Associate Dean, (Lubin); Ira Davidson, Director Small Business Development Center (Lubin) and Jorge Pinto, Director, Center for Global Finance, (Lubin).
3:30 p.m. Panel: “Prevention of Terrorism”
Moderator: H.R. Clarke, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences. Panelists: Vincent Beatty, (Dyson) H.R. Clarke, Thomas O’Sullivan (Dyson) and Roger Salerno (Dyson).

Wednesday, March 20

10:00 a.m.- 5:00 pm. “Rebuilding New York, Rebuilding America” Community Service at Ground Zero Relief Center, 304 Spring Street
6:00 p.m. Reception, Student Union

WHERE: Most activities will take place at 1 Pace Plaza across from City Hall unless
otherwise indicated.