NEWS RELEASE: Immigration: A Right or a Privilege? Discussion Sept. 14

As the mosque controversy fuels the debate over immigration policy reforms, Muzaffar A. Chishti, a lawyer and director of Migration Policy Institute’s office at New York University School of Law, will discuss “Immigration: A Right or a Privilege?” on Tuesday, September 14 at Pace University’s Constitution Day celebration on its downtown New York City campus in the Student Union, 12:30 p.m.-1:30 p.m. Open to the public.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact:

Pace University Public Information:  Bill Caldwell, (212) 346-1597 or wcaldwell@pace.edu

“Immigration: A Right or a Privilege?”  – A discussion at Pace University’s Constitution Day celebration Tuesday, September 14

As the mosque controversy fuels the debate over immigration policy reforms, Muzaffar A. Chishti, a lawyer and director of Migration Policy Institute’s office at New York University School of Law, will discuss “Immigration: A Right or a Privilege?” on Tuesday, September 14 at Pace University’s Constitution Day celebration on its downtown New York City campus in the Student Union, 12:30 p.m.-1:30 p.m. Open to the public.

Sen. Oppenheimer and Advocacy Groups Urge Gov. Paterson to Protect Domestic Violence Victims

Joined by representatives from the Pace Women’s Justice Center, My Sisters’ Place, Hope’s Door, and Legal Services for the Hudson Valley, Senator Suzi Oppenheimer (D-Mamaroneck) will call on Governor Paterson to sign into law sweeping legislation to strengthen the rights and protections of domestic violence survivors and increase the criminal penalties for domestic abuse.

News from STATE SENATOR Suzi Oppenheimer, New York State Senate, 37th District

For Immediate Release:

Contact: Debra Lagapa; lagapa@senate.state.ny.us; (914) 934-5250 (w); (914) 715-3125 (m)

*** MEDIA ADVISORY ***

SENATOR SUZI OPPENHEIMER STANDS WITH LEADING ADVOCACY GROUPS TO URGE GOVERNOR PATERSON TO ENACT NEW PROTECTIONS FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SURVIVORS

While violent crime overall has declined in recent years, violence against loved ones is on the rise.  In 2008, intimate partner homicides increased 25% statewide and 45% in counties outside New York City.  New York’s Domestic Violence Courts handled more than 31,000 cases in 2008, an increase of nearly 7,000 from 2007.  More than 400,000 incidents of domestic violence are reported to police departments in New York every year, while 300,000 calls are received by domestic violence hotlines throughout the state.  Indeed, 20 percent of all assaults occurring outside New York City are committed by “intimate partners.”

Joined by representatives from the Pace Women’s Justice Center, My Sisters’ Place, Hope’s Door, and Legal Services for the Hudson Valley, Senator Suzi Oppenheimer (D-Mamaroneck) will call on Governor Paterson to sign into law sweeping legislation to strengthen the rights and protections of domestic violence survivors and increase the criminal penalties for domestic abuse.

WHO: State Senator Suzi Oppenheimer (D-Mamaroneck)

Jane Aoyama-Martin, Exec. Dir., Pace Women’s Justice Center

My Sisters’ Place

Carla Horton, Exec. Dir., Hope’s Door

Robin Stiebel, Managing Atty, Yonkers office, Legal Services for the Hudson Valley

WHEN: Tuesday, August 10, 2010 @ 10:00 AM

WHERE: Pace Law School

Tudor Room, Preston Hall

78 North Broadway

White Plains, NY 10603

Pace Law School Student Selected as One of 20 Ms. JD Fellows

Pace Law School student Rachel Schwartzman was selected as one of 20 Ms. JD fellows for 2010, joining other rising law students from top law schools like Harvard, Yale and Columbia. The fellows were chosen from over 300 applicants representing 75 schools, among them law review editors-in-chief, published scholars and future judicial clerks.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Regina Pappalardo (914) 422-4268, rpappalardo@law.pace.edu

PACE LAW SCHOOL STUDENT RECOGNIZED AS ONE OF NATION’S MOST PROMISING THIRD-YEAR LAW STUDENTS

One of 20 fellows chosen by Ms. JD online community

WHITE PLAINS, NY, July 16, 2010 – Pace Law School student Rachel Schwartzman was selected as one of 20 Ms. JD fellows for 2010, joining other rising law students from top law schools like Harvard, Yale and Columbia. The fellows were chosen from over 300 applicants representing 75 schools, among them law review editors-in-chief, published scholars and future judicial clerks.

Ms. JD is an influential online community for women lawyers and law students. Fellows are selected based on academic performance, leadership and dedication to advancing the status of women in law. The winners include women planning to pursue careers in public interest, academia, and the private sector in every region of the country.

Ms. JD pairs each fellow with a distinguished female mentor. Schwartzman’s will be Lynn Hecht Schafran, senior vice president at Legal Momentum and director of Legal Momentum’s National Judicial Education Program to Promote Equality for Women and Men in the Courts (NJEP). Fellows participate in activities with their mentors, attend conferences and events, host an event at their law school, and are expected to mentor other young women during their career.

The opt-out rate

Schwartzman was drawn to the Ms. JD fellowship because of the mission of the organization, which focuses on the opt-out rate for women in law and the paucity of female leadership at the highest levels of the legal profession, topics on which she wrote a paper this past fall, “Gender Disparity in Law and Finance: Improving the Balance between Motherhood and High-level Careers.” She is currently seeking opportunities for publication.

By becoming involved with Ms. JD, Schwartzman hopes to “learn how to combat these problems head on by learning from women far more experienced than I am.”

“This award is an impressive tribute to the caliber of the students who attend Pace Law School,” said Michelle Simon, dean of Pace Law School. “Rachel is poised for a successful career as a lawyer and a champion of women, fitting with Pace Law’s long standing commitment to women’s issues. Our Women’s Justice Center is dedicated to helping victims of domestic violence. Professor Bridget Crawford, who blogs for the Feminist Law Professors blog http://www.feministlawprofessors.com,, is among the many professors and students working to further the cause of women in and out of the workplace.”

Multiple honors

Schwartzman is working as a summer associate at Cohen & Wolf, P.C. in Bridgeport, CT. At Pace she is a student editor on the Journal on Court Innovation and president of the Women’s Association of Law Students (WALS). She worked as an intern for the Honorable Joan G. Margolis, United States Magistrate Judge of the United States District Court in Connecticut, and as a paralegal in the Appeals Bureau of the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office. She graduated from Hamilton College magna cum laude, with a B.A. in Government.

This summer Schwartzman also received the Josephine and Anthony DiFiore Scholarship award, sponsored by the DiFiore Family, the Columbian Lawyers Association and Pace Law School. She also received the Justice Sandra Miller Scholarship from the Westchester Women’s Bar Association, and the Mid-Atlantic Women’s Studies Association (MAWSA) writing prize for Excellence in Graduate Studies.

All Ms. JD mentors are recipients of the American Bar Association’s (ABA) Margaret Brent Women Lawyers of Achievement Award. This award was established by the ABA Commission on Women in the Profession in 1991 and recognizes the accomplishments of female lawyers who have paved the way to success for other women in law.

Hillary Rodham Clinton, the first chair of the ABA Commission, issued a groundbreaking report in 1988 showing that women lawyers were not advancing at a satisfactory rate. The current chair, Roberta D. Liebenberg, spoke at the Pace Law School/Women’s Association of Law Students (WALS)/WWBA program on Women in the Profession in March.

About MSJD and Pace Law

Since its creation in 2006 by female law students from UC Berkeley, Cornell, Georgetown, Harvard, NYU, Stanford, UCLA, UT Austin, University of Chicago, University of Michigan, University of Virginia, and Yale the fellowship has been awarded annually to 20 of the “most promising third-year law students in the country.” The Ms. JD site is administered by an advisory board of female law students from top law schools nationwide. Three Pace Law School alumni attended the Ms. JD launch and alumnus Carly Grant served on its editorial board from 2007-2008. Schwartzman is the first Pace Law student to receive the honor.

Founded in 1976, Pace University School of Law has over 7,000 alumni throughout the country and the world and is consistently ranked among the nation’s top programs in environmental law. It offers full- and part-time day and evening JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus and offers the Master of Laws degree in Environmental Law, including the nation’s first graduate level programs in Climate Change and Land Use and Sustainable Development, and Comparative Legal Studies, and a Doctor of Laws in Environmental Law. The School of Law is part of Pace University, a comprehensive, independent, and diversified university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu

Pace-Led Team Finds That New York Sustainable Biofuel Could Help Decrease Greenhouse Gas Pollution

A report issued by a team led by Pace Law School’s Energy and Climate Center provides insights into possible future liquid transportation solutions. Use of biofuel made from wood, grass and other forms of biomass could reduce New York State’s gasoline consumption by as much as 16% of projected use in 2020 and play a significant role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, according to the report.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Cara Cea, (914) 773-3312, ccea@pace.edu

Pace-Led Team Finds That New York Sources of Sustainable Biofuel Could Help Decrease Greenhouse Gas Pollution, Create Jobs, and Increase Energy Security

WHITE PLAINS, NY (June 7, 2010) – A report issued by a team led by Pace Law School’s Energy and Climate Center provides insights into possible future liquid transportation solutions. Use of biofuel made from wood, grass and other forms of biomass could reduce New York State’s gasoline consumption by as much as 16% of projected use in 2020 and play a significant role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, according to the report.

Produced at the recommendation of Governor David Paterson’s Renewable Energy Task Force, the “Renewable Fuels Roadmap and Sustainable Biomass Feedstock Supply for New York State” (Roadmap) was developed to help guide state policy on renewable fuels.  The project was undertaken with funding from the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), and the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.

To conduct the study, the Pace Energy and Climate Center assembled a team of the leading authorities on biofuels throughout the Northeast, including researchers from Cornell University and the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, and from consulting firms on energy and environmental issues such as Energetics, Energy and Environmental Research Associates, and Antares Group.  The coalition known as Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management as well as Cornell Cooperative Extension branches throughout New York State were also members of the Pace-led team.

The Roadmap evaluates the future of liquid biofuel production and feedstock supplies (materials used to produce the biofuels) for transportation purposes in New York State in order to achieve reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions as well as achieve greater independence from petroleum usage.  In Executive Order No. 24 issued in August 2009, New York adopted a goal of achieving an 80% reduction in GHG emissions from 1990 levels by 2050, or an 80 by 50 target.  The Roadmap presents a snapshot of New York’s current biomass production, including agricultural products and forest products, as well as existing biomass feedstock inventory.  The Roadmap also considers land use issues, transportation and distribution infrastructure, competing uses for biomass, and technologies that are necessary to convert feedstocks to biofuels, for example, grasses or woody material to produce ethanol or soy to produce biodiesel.  In its analysis, the Roadmap examines the potential effects of increased use of renewable fuels, such as ethanol and biodiesel on economic development, the environment, and public health.

“The Roadmap sheds light on important aspects of how New York’s transportation infrastructure will develop,” stated Jamie Van Nostrand, Executive Director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center.  “In order to achieve an 80 by 50 target, we need to transition the transportation sector away from carbon-emitting fuels, either through electrification or use of renewable fuels.  Given the time it will take to transition to electric cars and to build the electrical grid infrastructure necessary to power this new fleet, ethanol-gasoline mixtures will still be a necessary component of this transition.”

“There is no silver bullet for ensuring New York’s clean energy future,“ according to Zywia Wojnar, Research Director at the Pace Energy and Climate Center, and Roadmap Project Manager.  “Biofuels could be an integral part of the fuel mix that is necessary to limit greenhouse gas emissions, while reducing dependency on fossil fuels.  The Roadmap provides important insights into just how a New York biofuels industry could help meet those goals.”

Some of the key findings include:

  • Based only on in-state feedstocks (e.g., perennial grasses, woody biomass, and soy from which biofuels are produced), New York could provide 5.6 – 16% of estimated 2020 gasoline consumption by the residents of New York State.
  • Biomass-based liquid fuels, or biofuels, potentially can play a large role in reducing the state’s emissions of greenhouse gases, which are a leading contributor to global warming.  A new industry that makes cellulosic biofuels from feedstocks grown in a sustainable manner has the potential to decrease GHG emissions by between 67% and 85% compared to the equivalent energy content of petroleum fuel.
  • Potentially negative environmental effects from the production of biofuels in New York State include deteriorated air quality, soil erosion, impaired water quality, acidification of water and soil, and reduced biodiversity.  Implementing appropriate best management practices in growing and harvesting the feedstocks would minimize some of these adverse effects.
  • Compared to fossil fuels, in a total life cycle analysis of cellulosic biofuels from sustainable feedstocks, levels of certain air pollutant emissions may be reduced, such as sulfur oxides and benzene. Levels of other pollutants may increase, such as nitrogen oxides, aldehydes, and particulate matter.  Increased emissions of some air pollutants may lead to increased public health concerns such as cardio-vascular diseases.
  • Four centralized large-scale or 24 smaller-scale biofuels product facilities could operate with sustainably available biomass in the State.
  • An assessment of the current technologies to convert biomass to advanced biofuels suggests that the industry is five to ten years away from commercial production.
  • Depending upon the rate at which the biofuels industry grows, between 4,000 and 14,000 jobs could be created state-wide.
  • Establishing a sustainable biofuels industry based upon the information provided in the Roadmap will require the adoption of new policies by New York State lawmakers.

Annual updates to the Roadmap report will be prepared in 2011 and 2012 in order to address technological improvements and policy developments.

A copy of the Roadmap can be found at www.law.pace.edu/energy/programs.

The Energy and Climate Center is an integral part of Pace Law School’s environmental law program, which regularly is ranked by U.S. News & World Report as one of the nation’s top environmental law programs.  For more than 20 years, the Energy and Climate Center has been a leading multi-disciplinary organization in the areas of environmental research and policy on energy issues in New York and throughout the Northeast, while training law students in these areas.www.law.pace.edu/energy

Founded in 1976, Pace University School of Law has nearly 6,700 alumni throughout the country and the world. It offers full- and part-time day and evening JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus. The School also offers the Master of Laws in Environmental Law, Climate Change Law, and in Comparative Legal Studies as well as an SJD in environmental law. The School of Law is part of a comprehensive, independent, and diversified University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu.

Westchester Communities Need to Continue Programs and Take New Action to Reduce Greenhouse Gases 20%

Westchester County and its municipalities are making progress toward meeting the climate change and sustainability goals set forth in the county’s Action Plan for Climate Change and Sustainable Development, according to a new report.

Pace Contact: Crista Scaturro, (914) 422-4389, cscaturro@law.pace.edu

NYLCVEF Contact: Dan Hendrick (212) 361-6350 ext. 206, dhendrick@nylcv.org

NEWS RELEASE

Report Tracks Progress Of Westchester County and its Municipalities in Meeting Climate Change and Sustainability Goals

Yearlong Study is Culmination of Partnership between Pace Law School CELS and New York League of Conservation Voters Education Fund

WHITE PLAINS, NY – Westchester County and its municipalities are making progress toward meeting the climate change and sustainability goals set forth in the county’s Action Plan for Climate Change and Sustainable Development, according to a new report.

The report – titled “Climate Adaptation and Mitigation: Westchester Responds to the Changing Future” – is the culmination of a yearlong partnership between the Pace Law School Center for Environmental Legal Studies and the New York League of Conservation Voters Education Fund.

The report tracks the progress that Westchester County and its municipalities reported in seven broad sustainability areas of the Westchester Action Plan: greenhouse gas emissions; energy; transportation; land use; funding resources; water resources/stormwater runoff; and solid waste reduction and recycling.

Two-thirds (33 out of 45) of the municipalities responded to the voluntary survey, which was conducted by Pace Law CELS students and NYLCVEF staff. Because adoption of the Action Plan’s recommendations was voluntary, the report aims to show residents and policymakers what their communities are doing and present an opportunity to learn from their neighbors.

“The publication of this report comes at a critical time. From the banks of the Hudson River to the shores of Long Island Sound, it is clear that the risks of not responding to climate change are great for communities in Westchester County,” said Alexandra Dapolito Dunn, Assistant Dean of Environmental Law Programs at Pace University School of Law and its Center for Environmental Legal Studies. “As this report shows, many of Westchester’s local governments are aware of climate change challenges and leading the way toward a more sustainable future.”

Marcia Bystryn, President of the New York League of Conservation Voters Education Fund, said: “The Westchester Action Plan set the bar for sustainability progress in the county. As more residents, municipalities and businesses become aware of what they can do to combat climate change, and realize the economic benefits of greater sustainability, the success of the Action Plan will continue.”

In spring 2008, the Westchester Action Plan for Climate Change and Sustainable Development set a goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions within the county 20 percent by 2015 (from 2005 levels) and 80 percent by 2050. The Action Plan lays out direct and capacity-building actions to achieve this goal by implementing short-, mid- and long-term strategies that engage county and municipal governments, the business sector, educational institutions and individual households.

The Pace Law/NYLCVEF survey shows that progress varies greatly among the goal areas. For example:

• 30 percent of participating municipalities have completed an inventory of their greenhouse gas emissions;

• 52 percent have audited their energy use to identify ways to conserve;

• Three out of four survey participants have programs designed to replace municipal vehicles with more energy-efficient models;

• 83 percent have integrated sustainability into their comprehensive plans;

• Slightly less than half (42 percent) have policies that encourage the use of environmentally sensitive products;

• 100 percent reported they follow best practices to manage stormwater and runoff in order to protect water resources; and

• Slightly more than half (52 percent) have developed plans for waste reduction, recycling and reuse.

The full report can be viewed online at www.nylcvef.org and www.law.pace.edu.

The report concludes that Westchester’s communities will need to continue current programs and take new actions to meet the Action Plan’s short-term goal of a 20 percent reduction in greenhouse gases by 2015.

“Despite the sluggish economy, opportunities do exist to make progress,” said Dean Dunn. “Many of the examples in our report demonstrate that changes to zoning, enforcement or purchasing both reduce greenhouse gas emissions and save taxpayer dollars.”

NYLCVEF President Bystryn added: “This year ushered in new leadership for Westchester County and a number of municipalities. It is up to our new leaders to reaffirm climate reduction goals, preserve past actions and implement new steps that achieve even greater results. The longer government waits to meet the challenges of climate change, the more difficult and expensive it will be to do so down the road.”

Founded in 1976, Pace University School of Law has over 7,000 alumni throughout the country and the world and is consistently ranked among the nation’s top three programs in environmental law. It offers full- and part-time day and evening JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus and offers the Master of Laws degree in Environmental Law, Real Estate Law and Comparative Legal Studies, and a Doctor of Laws in environmental law. The School of Law is part of Pace University, a comprehensive, independent, and diversified university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu

The New York League of Conservation Voters Education Fund (NYLCVEF) engages and educates New Yorkers on environmental issues and the environmental decision-making processes at the local, regional, state and federal government levels. NYLCVEF fosters open, non-partisan discussion on environmental policy and empowers New Yorkers to be effective advocates for the environment. www.nylcvef.org

Findings of One-Year Study of Greenhouse Gas Reduction of 30 Municipalities to be Announced

Findings will be detailed from a year-long study, that Pace Law was asked to help facilitate, of local and county government greenhouse gas reduction programs. Two-thirds of the 45 municipalities – or 30 municipalities with a total population of over half a million – in Westchester County responded to the voluntary survey, which was conducted jointly by Pace Law School’s Center for Environmental Legal Studies Research Assistants with the New York League of Conservation Voters Education Fund.

REDUCING OUR CARBON FOOTPRINT

MEDIA ADVISORY

NEWS CONFERENCE: WEDNESDAY, MARCH 17 AT 12:00 NOON, PACE LAW SCHOOL, WHITE PLAINS

FINDINGS FROM A ONE-YEAR STUDY OF 30 LOCAL MUNICIPALITIES AND THEIR GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION PROGRAMS

“MOVING INTO ACTION” RECOMMENDATIONS ON HOW WESTCHESTER CAN BECOME MORE ENVIROMENTALLY SUSTAINABLE AND CONSERVE RESOURCES FOR OUR FUTURE GENERATIONS

PRESENTED BY

Pace Law School and NY League of Conservation Voters Education Fund

WHAT: News conference to present “Climate Adaptation and Mitigation: Westchester Responds to the Changing Future” findings from 30 municipalities.

Findings will be detailed from a year-long study, that Pace Law was asked to help facilitate, of local and county government greenhouse gas reduction programs. Two-thirds of the 45 municipalities – or 30 municipalities with a total population of over half a million – in Westchester County responded to the voluntary survey, which was conducted jointly by Pace Law School’s Center for Environmental Legal Studies Research Assistants with the New York League of Conservation Voters Education Fund.

The survey centered on seven areas of environmental goals set forth in the Westchester Action Plan for Climate Change and Sustainable Development: (1) greenhouse gas footprints; (2) energy; (3) transportation; (4) land use; (5) funding resources; (6) water resources/stormwater runoff; and (7) waste reduction and recycling.

WHO: The Pace Law School Center for Environmental Legal Studies and the New York League of Conservation Voters Education Fund will host the news conference to announce the release of the co-authored report “Climate Adaptation and Mitigation: Westchester Responds to the Changing Future.” Senior environmental law experts from Pace Law School and the New York League of Conservation Voters Education Fund who will outline the report’s findings and put the results into context for Westchester’s future are:

• Marcia Bystryn, President of New York League of Conservation Voters

• Michelle S. Simon, Dean of Pace Law School

• Alexandra Dapolito Dunn, Assistant Dean of Environmental Law Programs, Pace Law School

WHEN: Wednesday, March 17 at 12 noon

WHERE: Pace Law School (Preston Hall, Tudor Room),

78 North Broadway,

White Plains, NY

Media admission by press pass. Check-in required.

Media contacts:

Crista Scaturro, (914) 422-4389, cscaturro@law.pace.edu

Cara Cea, (914) 906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

Founded in 1976, Pace University School of Law has over 7,000 alumni throughout the country and the world and is consistently ranked among the nation’s top three programs in environmental law. It offers full- and part-time day and evening JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus and offers the Master of Laws degree in Environmental Law, Real Estate Law and Comparative Legal Studies, and a Doctor of Laws in environmental law. The School of Law is part of Pace University, a comprehensive, independent, and diversified university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu

The New York League of Conservation Voters Education Fund (NYLCVEF) educates New Yorkers about environmental issues and the environmental decision-making process on the local, state and federal levels. Established in 1993 as the educational affiliate of the New York League of Conservation Voters, NYLCVEF fosters open, nonpartisan discussion on environmental policy, and empowers New Yorkers to participate in environmental protection efforts in their communities. www.nylcv.org

Former Mayor Ed Koch to Keynote ABA Law Student Division Annual Spring Meeting at Pace Law Saturday

The American Bar Association Law Student Division (2nd Circuit) will convene its annual Spring Meeting at Pace Law School on Saturday, February 27. The meeting will bring together students, legal professionals and representatives from government for a full day of panel discussions and information sessions on the Law School’s campus in White Plains.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact: Crista Scaturro, (914) 422-4389, cscaturro@law.pace.edu

Cara Cea, (914) 773-3312, ccea@pace.edu

AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION LAW STUDENT DIVISION TO HOLD SPRING MEETING AT PACE LAW SCHOOL

Former NYC Mayor Ed Koch will deliver keynote address

WHITE PLAINS, NY – The American Bar Association Law Student Division (2nd Circuit) will convene its annual Spring Meeting at Pace Law School on Saturday, February 27. The meeting will bring together students, legal professionals and representatives from government for a full day of panel discussions and information sessions on the Law School’s campus in White Plains.

The highlight of the event will be the keynote address, delivered by Edward Koch, former Mayor of New York City, who is expected to discuss his many years of public service and the challenges and opportunities for recent law school graduates.

Additionally, the meeting will feature an exciting presentation by Above the Law editor, Elie Ying Mystal, whose no-holds-barred musings on the current state of the legal profession have garnered the self-described “legal tabloid” mainstream media attention. The Washington Post called Above the Law “a must-read legal blog,” while the American Bar Association’s Journal listed Above the Law in its “Blawg 100: The 100 best web sites by lawyers, for lawyers, as chosen by the editors of the ABA Journal.”

WHO: Edward Koch, Former New York City Mayor; Elie Ying Mystal, Editor, Above the Law; Brian Kolb, New York State Senate Minority Leader; Law professionals from the NY-Metro area

WHAT: American Bar Association Law Student Division (2nd Circuit) Spring Meeting

WHERE: Pace Law School (Preston Hall – Tudor Room) 78 North Broadway, White Plains, NY

WHEN: Saturday, February 27, 2010; sessions begin at 9:30am and continue through 4:30pm; Keynote Address by Mayor Koch at 11:00am

Media admission by press pass. Check-in required.

For more information on the ABA Student Division spring meeting, including registration instructions, please visit the ABA Student Division website.

Founded in 1976, Pace University School of Law has over 7,000 alumni throughout the country and the world and is consistently ranked among the nation’s top three programs in environmental law. It offers full- and part-time day and evening JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus and offers the Master of Laws degree in Environmental Law, Real Estate Law and Comparative Legal Studies, and a Doctor of Laws in environmental law. The School of Law is part of Pace University, a comprehensive, independent, and diversified university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu

Pace Law Alumnus and Newly Elected Mayor of White Plains to be Honored in Ceremony and Reception

Pace Law School will host a ceremony and reception in honor of its alumnus Adam Bradley, newly-elected Mayor of White Plains at the Pace University Law School.

Contact: Crista Scaturro, (914) 422-4389, cscaturro@law.pace.edu

Contact: Cara Cea, (914) 773-3312, ccea@pace.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY WHITE PLAINS MAYOR ADAM BRADLEY TO BE HONORED BY PACE LAW SCHOOL Ceremony and cocktail reception to be held Wednesday, February 3 WHITE PLAINS, NY, February 2, 2010 – Pace Law School will host a ceremony and reception in honor of its alumnus Adam Bradley, newly-elected Mayor of White Plains. WHEN: Wednesday, February 3, 2010 at 5:30 pm; reception to follow WHERE: Pace Law School (Preston Hall, Tudor Room) 78 North Broadway White Plains, NY WHO: Adam Bradley, Mayor of White Plains Stephen J. Friedman, President of Pace University Michelle S. Simon, Dean of Pace Law School Bradley is the seventeenth mayor of White Plains and the first alumnus of the 34-year-old school to hold this office in a major metropolitan area. A brief ceremony will include remarks by Pace University President Stephen Friedman and Pace Law Dean Michelle Simon. Mayor Bradley is also expected to speak about his time at Pace and his plans for the future of White Plains. Bradley graduated from Pace University in 1985 and from Pace Law School in 1989. Before winning election as mayor, Bradley had represented White Plains in Albany since 2003 as Assemblyman for the 89th District. He has been an advocate for families, for protection of the environment and for preservation of open and natural spaces. In one of his first acts as mayor Bradley initiated the “Haiti: White Plains Cares” program, which will coordinate the efforts of the White Plains community to assist the victims of the devastating earthquake. Media admission by press pass. Check-in required. Founded in 1976, Pace University School of Law has over 7,000 alumni throughout the country and the world and is consistently ranked among the nation’s top three programs in environmental law. It offers full- and part-time day and evening JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus and offers the Master of Laws degree in Environmental Law, Real Estate Law and Comparative Legal Studies, and a Doctor of Laws in environmental law. The School of Law is part of Pace University, a comprehensive, independent, and diversified university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu

State of the Union, State of the Stimulus – Pace Offers Case Studies

Pace University today announced that to date it has received eight federal stimulus awards totaling $1.8 million to fund research and community projects at its schools of computing, education, nursing, and law. Pace has submitted 32 stimulus proposals, of which we have received eight to date. The eight awards are:

Efficient energy for the environment. An enlarged Northeast Clean Energy Application Center to promote co-generation and other high efficiency, low emission power systems will be the result of the largest grant. The Pace Energy and Climate Center at Pace Law School will share $952,000 from the U.S. Department of Energy with the Center for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy at the University of Massachusetts.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts: Pace Public Information: Bill Caldwell, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu, or Chris Cory, 212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY WINS $1.8 MILLION IN STIMULUS FUNDING

Projects involve

• green energy for the Northeast US,

• help for NYC’s Chinatown,

• new teaching methods

• mentoring for urban service careers

• nursing scholarships for disadvantaged students

• a NYC entrepreneurship website

New York, NY, January 27, 2010 –– Pace University today announced that to date it has received eight federal stimulus awards totaling $1.8 million to fund research and community projects at its schools of computing, education, nursing, and law. Pace has submitted 32 stimulus proposals, of which we have received eight to date. The eight awards are:

Efficient energy for the environment. An enlarged Northeast Clean Energy Application Center to promote co-generation and other high efficiency, low emission power systems will be the result of the largest grant. The Pace Energy and Climate Center at Pace Law School will share $952,000 from the U.S. Department of Energy with the Center for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy at the University of Massachusetts.

The Northeast region has significant potential for supplying alternative clean energy technologies like combined heat and power generation (“cogeneration”), waste heat recovery systems, and district energy systems. Besides environmental benefits, using less energy and other efficiencies will reduce the dollars flowing out of the region to pay for energy. The center serves New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine.

The clean energy center also received $55,027 from the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) to help with a 2009 conference that identified market based strategies to achieve energy conservation and a cleaner environment.

The Principal Investigator is Thomas G. Bourgeois, the deputy director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center, tbourgeois@law.pace.edu.

Relief to NYC Downtown and, Chinatown. Pace’s Community and Volunteer Mobilization AmeriCorps Program received $347,403 through New York State to deepen and broaden its service to needy and vulnerable people in New York City’s Downtown and Chinatown communities. Schools and nonprofit organizations there have been pinched by the economic crisis, and the grant will help place Pace students in after-school programs and as classroom assistants, tutors, college counselors, and instructors in English and US citizenship. The students are recruited for a year of service and learning by Pace’s Dyson Center for Undergraduate Research Experiences, working closely with the Pace Office of Co-op and Career Services.

The Principal Investigator is Professor Maria Iacullo-Bird, Executive Director of the Pace Center for Undergraduate Research Experiences, miacullobird@pace.edu.

Collaborative groups for teacher learning. Teaching based on inquiries raised and researched by high school students is increasing in US schools. To help teachers learn this methodology, Pace’s School of Education received $261,870 to partner with four secondary schools it partners with — Pace High School and Millennium High School in New York City, and Peekskill High School and Sleepy Hollow High School in Westchester County. Facilitators from the School of Education are meeting 15 times during the current school year with groups from the schools to develop the schools’ capacity to create, implement and evaluate collaborative groups of their own in which teachers raise inquiries. The project will culminate in a Teaching and Learning Conference for all stakeholders.

The Principal Investigators are Professors Christine Clayton and James Kilbane, cclayton@pace.edu and jkilbane@pace.edu. The funds come through the New York State Education Department Teacher/Leader Quality Partnership Programs.

Mentoring for urban service careers. Pace undergraduate and graduate students who are planning educationally-related urban careers in teaching, psychology, and speech pathology are getting personalized mentoring via a grant of $74,432 through the New York State Education Department to Pace’s Teacher Opportunity Corps. To improve the students’ success and retention, the program is offering personalized tutoring in service learning and instructional technology, and in career-related decision-making in areas like writing academic projects and grant applications, applying for scholarships, and career planning. Qualified participants also get stipends and undergraduate seminar credits.

The Principal Investigator is professor Mary Rose McCarthy, mmccarthy2@pace.edu.

Expanded nursing scholarships and loans. Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing received $15,256 (in part from Stimulus funds) from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration to offer scholarships to disadvantaged nursing students. The same agency also awarded the school $52,414 for its Nurse Faculty Loan Program, a loan fund for full and part-time students working toward an MA in Nursing Education. Recipients who complete the program may cancel up to 85% of their NFLP loan if they serve for four consecutive years as a full-time faculty member at a school of nursing.

Principal Investigator for the scholarships is professor Susan Gordon, sgordon@pace.edu; for the loan fund it is professor Marilyn Jaffe-Ruiz, mjafferuiz@pace.edu.

A New York City entrepreneurship website. Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems and its Pace Web Solutions Development Team received $90,000 to help the New York City Economic Development Corporation create a centralized Web portal for entrepreneurs. The portal will showcase New York as a center of entrepreneurial opportunity and become a go-to site providing information, resources and contact points for start-ups, entrepreneurs and investors of all sizes. The Pace team of technologists, Web developers and entrepreneurs will serve as a consulting group on the portal’s architecture and content, identifying the best available Web technologies.

The Principal Investigator is Professor Jonathan Hill, jhill@pace.edu, with Professors Bruce Bachenheimer and Claudia Green.

Overall assessment

“We are very pleased with the opportunistic faculty members who have taken advantage of the uniqueness of this generous funding to support the University’s many efforts to help stimulate the economy,” said Victor Goldsmith, Associate Provost for Sponsored Research and Economic Development at Pace. “Our students and faculty members are working hard on a variety of projects, and we hope to continue securing additional stimulus funds with them in the current federal fiscal year.”

To date Pace has submitted 32 stimulus proposals, of which 16 are still pending. The process for new stimulus proposal submissions is expected to end in September 2010.

About Pace

For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter | Flickr | YouTube .

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Pace Law School Named by EPA to China Environmental Law Initiative

The Environmental Protection Agency has added Pace Law School to its impressive roster of collaborating organizations working on the China Environmental Law Initiative.

Contact: Crista Scaturro, (914) 422-4389, cscaturro@law.pace.edu

Cara Cea, (914) 773-3312, ccea@pace.edu

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Environmental Protection Agency Names Pace Law School to China Environmental Law Initiative

WHITE PLAINS, NY – The Environmental Protection Agency has added Pace Law School to its impressive roster of collaborating organizations working on the China Environmental Law Initiative.

Launched by the EPA in 2007, the China Environmental Law Initiative has established a dialogue between the U.S. and China with regard to environmental law standards and practices. Collaborating organizations, including Pace Law School, were chosen to share with the Chinese government and other stakeholders best practices on topics ranging from climate change to pollution control to engaging public support for environmentally sustainable programs.

“We at Pace Law are thrilled to see our relationships, both with the EPA and with groups in China, formalized in such a prominent way,” said Assistant Dean for Environmental Law Programs Alexandra Dunn. “This is the result of several years of hard work on all sides.”

In this new role, Pace Law School faculty and students will work with the EPA and other collaborating organizations in making environmental law information both accessible and current. This will include maintaining information on the EPA China Initiative Web site, as well as conducting additional research. The goal is to ensure that both China and the U.S. are able to take advantage of all available environmental law developments.

The EPA appointment is the most recent linkage between Pace Law School and environmental law programs in China. Since 2005, Pace Law School has also participated in a number of environmental law conferences and programs with law schools in China, including Wuhan University School of Law (in Hubei Province) and Jiao Tong University (in Shanghai).

“This new collaboration furthers Pace Law School’s long history of working with EPA attorneys and Chinese scholars on comparative U.S.-China environmental law, of which we are so proud,” said Assistant Dean Dunn.

Pace joins law schools from George Washington University and the University of Maryland, as well as Vermont Law School, the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars and the American Chamber of Commerce of Shanghai as collaborators in the Initiative.

Founded in 1976, Pace University School of Law has over 7,500 alumni throughout the country and the world and is consistently ranked among the nation’s top three programs in environmental law. It offers full- and part-time day and evening JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus and offers the Master of Laws degree in Environmental Law, Real Estate Law and Comparative Legal Studies, and a Doctor of Laws in environmental law. The School of Law is part of Pace University, a comprehensive, independent, and diversified university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu