The New York Times: “Law Student’s Alter Ego: Filmmaker”

Anthony Desiato, a current Pace law student and comic shop employee, is featured in an interesting article in the New York Times after making a documentary or “D.I.Y film” as his “creative outlet… ‘in order to stay sane'” and landed the coveted chance to show it at Comic-Con.

Anthony Desiato, a current Pace law student and comic shop employee, is featured in an interesting article in the New York Times after making a documentary or “D.I.Y film” as his “creative outlet… ‘in order to stay sane'” and landed the coveted chance to show it at Comic-Con.

The film is a sweet-natured exploration of Mr. Oto’s quirky relationship with his shop, his employees and his loyal, foul-mouthed and eccentric clientele, some of them man-cave-dwellers who seem to have sprung from the pages of the comic books they hoard and devour. Mr. Desiato’s collection, of 500 graphic novels and 100 superhero statuettes, is confined to his bedroom at his parents’ home.

He wrapped the film in time to return to law school in the fall and then went toWithoutabox, an online hub for film festival submissions, and sent out a dozen paid applications. The movie was picked up by NewFilmmakers, which screened it at Anthology Film Archives in May. Now comes Comic-Con, a mainstream event that draws 130,000 comics aficionados each summer. Mr. Desiato’s was one of just five documentaries accepted.

"Far left, Steve Oto, who owns the comics shop Alternate Realities, in Scarsdale, N.Y., and Anthony Desiato, a law student and shop employee who made a film about it." Richard Perry/The New York Times

Read the full article in The New York Times online.

Pace Law School

MidHudsonNews.com: “Cronin awarded Jefferson Gold Medal”

John Cronin has been a part of the Hudson River environmental movement since 1973 when he started with the Clearwater organization. He reflects how Clearwater founder Pete Seeger recruited him as a volunteer.

John Cronin is a senior fellow at Pace University and executive director of the Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries.

He can also add another title to his resume, a recipient of the Jefferson Award, named for Thomas Jefferson and founded by former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis as a “Noble Prize for public service.”

Cronin was described by the Jefferson Awards Board of Selectors as “Hero for the Planet [and] equal parts detective, scientist and public advocate.” The board said his efforts “have inspired a legacy of programs across the globe, fighting pollution on six continents.”

The MidHudsonNews reports Pace University President Stephen Friedman nominated Cronin for the award, for which Cronin said he was both humbled and honored.

The Associated Press: “Jefferson Prizes For Public Service Awarded To 18” – including Pace’s John Cronin, an internationally renowned environmentalist

Recipients of the 2011 Jefferson Awards – dubbed a “Nobel Prize” for public service – include John Cronin (pictured), Senior Fellow for Environmental Affairs, Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, Pace University.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, actress Marlo Thomas, Chicago sports team owner Jerry M. Reinsdorf and environmental advocate John Cronin (Pace Academy’s Senior Fellow in Environmental Affairs) are among the people and institutions honored with a national prize for public service on Tuesday evening, June 21 in Washington, DC reports The Associated Press.

The Jefferson Awards, now in their 39th year, were co-founded by former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and are named for founding father Thomas Jefferson.

The Guardian: “Dick Cheney’s Halliburton: a corporate case study”

A Pace Law School professor Jill Gross is quoted in an article in The Guardian.

A Pace Law School professor Jill Gross is quoted in an article in The Guardian:

It is unlikely that the plaintiffs in the class action lawsuit will ever get a penny back from [Dick] Cheney’s Halliburton now, but there are some immediate winners. “The supreme court’s unanimous opinion sends a strong signal that lower courts cannot use class certification as a procedural device to block investors from vindicating their statutory rights,” Pace University law school professor Jill Gross told Reuters.

To read the full article, visit The Guardian online.

Check out Pace Law School here.

LoHud.com: “Minor party has too much to pull”

Pace Law professor writes an opinion article in the Journal News online (LoHud.com) about the politics of same-sex marriage.

Pace Law professor writes an opinion article in the Journal News online (LoHud.com) about the politics of same-sex marriage.

From LoHud.com:

Courage is not a quality that we usually associate with politics, or politicians. Compromise, deal-making, arm-twisting, quid pro quos, are most often the ingredients of lawmaking. So we should not be surprised that despite popular support for legalizing gay marriage, and despite the strenuous advocacy by the governor, the mayor, and other leading figures, a small and marginal political party, with a leader wielding outsized influence, will be the decider in this momentous battle.

Read the full opinion article here.

LoHud.com and Ithaca Journal Online: “N.Y. Senate passes bill to create violent felon registry”

Pace law professor Adele Bernhard criticized the newly passed bill by the New York Senate which will create a “violent felony offender registry” state-wide. Bernhard believes the bill won’t help a person become rehabilitated.

Pace law professor Adele Bernhard criticized the newly passed bill by the New York Senate which will create a “violent felony offender registry” state-wide. Bernhard believes the bill won’t help a person become rehabilitated.

“She [Bernhard] said the bill wouldn’t reduce crime and only make it more difficult for convicted felons to re-enter society after they’ve completed their sentences.”

Read the complete article at LoHud.com or Ithaca Journal online.

THE JOURNAL NEWS: Meet Hartsdale’s Anthony Desiato, Documentary Filmmaker About A Scarsdale Comic Book Store

Hartsdale resident and Pace Law School student, Anthony Desiato, recently made an independent documentary titled “My Comic Shop Documentary” while working at the comic shop “Alternate Realities” in Scarsdale, NY. Next month, the documentary will be shown as part of the long-running New Filmmakers New York Series.

Meet Hartsdale’s Anthony Desiato, Documentary Filmmaker About A Scarsdale Comic Book Store

The story was again featured in The Journal News with photos on May 9, 2011 in an article entitled Screen Gems.

THE JOURNAL NEWS: Spending Cuts Already Felt In Lower Hudson Valley Courts; More Loom

Due to spending cuts felt in the Lower Hudson Valley, the Judicial Institute at Pace Law School in White Plains must also prepare for some cuts.

Spending Cuts Already Felt In Lower Hudson Valley Courts; More Loom | LoHud.com

NEWS RELEASE: Climate Action Plan for Town of Red Hook to be developed by Pace Law School’s Energy and Climate Center

Pace Law School’s Energy and Climate Center will be developing an action plan for the town of Red Hook. Municipalities elsewhere are also waking up to the benefits of local climate improvement for their citizens and the planet.

Climate Action Plan for Town of Red Hook to be developed by Pace Law School’s Energy and Climate Center

Municipalities elsewhere also waking up to the benefits of local climate improvement for their citizens and the planet

WHITE PLAINS, NY, March 25, 2011 –Like a growing number of municipalities in New York and around the country, the small Dutchess County town of Red Hook is thinking proactively about climate change. Town officials recently signed a contract with Pace Law School’s Energy and Climate Center (PECC) to develop and implement a Climate Action Plan.

Red Hook has already taken the first step in its journey: taking stock of the carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases it emits.

Joining a proactive trend

As energy consultants, PECC staff will follow internationally recognized milestones from ICLEI, an association of over 1,200 local governments around the globe that promotes sustainable development. The PECC consultants will set a greenhouse gas reduction target for Red Hook, and develop an action plan to achieve that goal.

In seeking to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, Red Hook joins the ranks of other local communities that are taking action. Last year, 14 municipalities in Northern Westchester County formed the Northern Westchester Energy Action Consortium. Its goals: reduce reliance on fossil fuels, save money for residents and businesses, increase energy efficiency, enable renewable energy generation and increase economic activity.

Seven of those communities were awarded grants from the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) to develop climate action plans.

“The real action is local”

The plan will address the residential, commercial and transportation sectors of the Red Hook community, among others, and include a timeline, description of financing mechanisms, and assignment of responsibility to departments and staff. Community input and involvement will be sought throughout the process.

James Van Nostrand, PECC executive director, said, “We have been very involved at the state and regional levels in addressing climate change issues, but the real action is at the local level to implement the strategies necessary to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Through this work, we will effectively carry out the policies we have been promoting to help local governments and their constituents reduce their energy bills and follow more sustainable practices.”

“We are pleased to have the opportunity to work with the Town of Red Hook on this project,” he added.

The $52,000, one-year contract is funded by a grant from NYSERDA. Anne Marie Hirschberger, Climate Change Law and Policy Advisor at PECC and a graduate of Pace Law School’s J.D. and Climate Change LLM programs, will serve as project manager. She will collaborate with PECC staff and interns.

Hirschberger said, “Addressing climate change at the local level is a critical element in achieving meaningful greenhouse gas reductions, and the Town of Red Hook has already demonstrated its leadership in this area. I look forward to working with the Town over the coming year to build upon its current programs.”

Sue Crane, Town Supervisor of Red Hook, said, “The Town of Red Hook is delighted to be associated with the impressive resources of the Pace Energy and Climate Center through this NYSERDA funded program. For years the Town Board and our volunteer Conservation Advisory Council leadership have pursued efforts to raise awareness, provide education and demonstrate our commitment to sustainable programs and projects. With Anne Marie Hirschberger’s experienced management skills, together with the expertise of PECC consultants, we look forward to joining in creative, practical, replicable climate change programs that will help residents reduce their energy usage.”

Contact:

Lauren Rubenstein
Manager, Media Relations
(914) 422-4389
cell (914) 329-8680
lrubenstein@law.pace.edu

Anne Marie Hirschberger
Ottinger Energy Research Fellow
Pace Energy and Climate Center
(914) 422-4126
ahirschberger@law.pace.edu

Founded in 1976, Pace University School of Law has over 7,000 alumni throughout the country and the world and is consistently ranked among the nation’s top four programs in environmental law. It offers full- and part-time JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus and offers the Master of Laws degree in Environmental Law and Comparative Legal Studies, and a Doctor of Laws in environmental law. The School of Law is part of Pace University, a comprehensive, independent, and diversified university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu http://www.pace.edu/environment/

NEWS RELEASE: Institute to Support Increasing Numbers of Environmental Courts Launches at the Law School

Hosted in conjunction with the New York State Judicial Institute, the International Symposium on Environmental Courts Tribunals will take place from 9 a.m. 5:30 p.m. April 1 at the Judicial Institute on the Pace Law School campus, 78 North Broadway, White Plains, NY.

Pace Law School launches institute to strengthen fast-growing environmental courts and tribunals, now numbering 380 worldwide

Comprehensive view of the movement’s successes and challenges to emerge from April 1 Symposium bringing together international environmental judges and academics

WHITE PLAINS, NY, March 24, 2011–Despite the enactment of environmental statutes and negotiation of treaties since the 1970s, the global environment has degraded since that time rather than improved. But a recent grass roots movement is giving hope to environmentalists: More than 50 nations have created specialized environmental courts and tribunals to give priority attention to enforcing these laws.

While the strength of these courts may be largely untested, Pace Law School—ranked third in environmental law and sponsor of numerous judicial training workshops, symposia and conferences—believes fervently in their prospects. So much so that it is nurturing this “grassroots movement” by convening a landmark meeting of key international judges and scholars on Friday, April 1 to discuss their successes and challenges.

World Map of Countries with Environmental Courts and Tribunals

There are 380 such courts in operation today—nearly half of them created in the past five years alone. In the US, there is presently only one environmental court, in Vermont.

  • In China, where extraordinarily rapid economic growth has produced extreme air and water pollution, the government has authorized its citizens to bring lawsuits against polluting industries (many of them government enterprises) and 14 provinces have set up new environmental courts.
  • In India, the legislature has set up a nationwide system of “Green Tribunals” to hear citizen complaints on an expedited basis and see how best to apply the Supreme Court’s environmental law decisions, the most advanced set developed in any nation
  • In Kenya, plagued by dishonest practices in government and the courts, the Environment Court over the past two years has established a new standard for honest and open adjudication.
Nicholas Robinson

“These specialized courts are crucial to enforcing environmental laws that seek to curb greenhouse gas emissions, cope with sea level rise, abate pollution, safeguard biodiversity and protect threatened areas,” said Professor Nicholas Robinson, Pace’s University Professor on the Environment, founder of the Pace Law School’s environmental law programs, and a key player over the past 15 years in the movement to strengthen environmental courts worldwide. “In contrast to traditional courts, judges and administrators at these environmental courts become well-versed in environmental science and develop a sound understanding of environmental law. This enables the courts to make decisions more promptly, foster consistent rulings across time and show professionalism and independence.”

A briefing paper by Robinson outlining the history of environmental courts, ideas for educational modules, and a vision of a worldwide support system for such courts, is available online here.

Hosted in conjunction with the New York State Judicial Institute, the International Symposium on Environmental Courts & Tribunals will take place from 9 a.m. 5:30 p.m. April 1 at the Judicial Institute on the Pace Law School campus, 78 North Broadway, White Plains, NY. Media are welcome, with advance notice to Lauren Rubenstein.

Attendees at the symposium include Justice Antonio H. Benjamin of the High Court of Brazil; Justice Brian Preston, Chief Judge of the Land & Environment Court of New South Wales, Australia; Judge Donald Kaniaru of the Environment Court of Kenya; Judge Meredith Wright of the Vermont Environmental Court; and Scott Fulton, General Counsel of the US EPA.

One of the attendees, Justice Antonio H. Benjamin of Brazil, said, “There is remarkable similarity among courts across most nations regarding environmental protection. The health of people and welfare of nature are essential for sustainable development, as the United Nations has often stated. Courts are only now delineating the environmental dimensions to justice. Aspirations for good governance and eco-sustainability depend on how courts enforce environmental legislation and treaties. It is nothing short of remarkable that so many nations recently have decided to establish environmental courts to do so.”

Photo Credit: WRI.org

The symposium will discuss the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resource’s proposal to establish an International Judicial Institute for Environmental Adjudication, to be presented to the United Nations Summit planned for June 2012 in Rio de Janeiro, “Rio+20.”

The Institute—a collaboration between Pace Law School, the IUCN’s Commission on Environmental Law and the Washington, DC-based Environmental Law Institute—would develop a cohesive international community of environmental judges, scholars and court administrators to promote the highest standards of environmental justice, protection and conservation.

“The rapid emergence of these environmental courts necessitates an autonomous judicial institute to facilitate the exchange of experience, build capacity for best judicial practices and lend collective support for realizing the rule of law in environmental case adjudication,” said Professor Robinson.

Contact:

Lauren Rubenstein
Manager, Media Relations
(914) 422-4389
cell (914) 329-8680
lrubenstein@law.pace.edu

Nicholas Robinson
Pace Law School
(914) 422-4244
nrobinson@law.pace.edu

Founded in 1976, Pace University School of Law has over 7,000 alumni throughout the country and the world and is consistently ranked among the nation’s top four programs in environmental law. It offers full- and part-time JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus and offers the Master of Laws degree in Environmental Law and Comparative Legal Studies, and a Doctor of Laws in environmental law. The School of Law is part of Pace University, a comprehensive, independent, and diversified university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu http://www.pace.edu/environment/