Pace University Receives 2002 Sloane-C Award for Excellence in Online Student Satisfaction

Pace University’s School of Computer Science and Information Systems (CSIS) has been selected to receive the 2002 Sloan-C Award for Excellence in Online Student Satisfaction for its National Coalition for Telecommunications Education and Learning (NACTEL) Program. The NACTEL Program at CSIS has made it possible for hundreds of employees of four major phone companies and two unions to earn associate degrees in telecommunications online.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

New York, NY – October 7, 2002 – Pace University’s School of Computer Science and Information Systems (CSIS) has been selected to receive the 2002 Sloan-C Award for Excellence in Online Student Satisfaction for its National Coalition for Telecommunications Education and Learning (NACTEL) Program. The NACTEL Program at CSIS has made it possible for hundreds of employees of four major phone companies and two unions to earn associate degrees in telecommunications online.

This award recognizes CSIS for its efforts to implement and share an improvement system based on a continuous stream of student feedback to refine student services, pedagogy, and curriculum. It is one of five awards in a new category designed to recognize excellence in the various approaches and methods posted on the Sloan-C Effective Practices Web site. To help make quality education online part of everyday life, accessible and affordable for anyone, anywhere, at any time, in a wide variety of disciplines, Sloan-C shares effective practices online at http://www.sloan-c.org/effectivepractices.

“We are delighted that our students and members of the NACTEL team are being recognized for their efforts to continuously improve and refine the online program,” said Susan M. Merritt, dean of the School. “The feedback from students and the quality of response from faculty and staff has been outstanding.”

The award will be presented to CSIS at the Eighth Sloan-C International Conference on Asynchronous Learning Networks, November 8, Orlando, FL.

Sponsored by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Sloan-C is primarily a consortium of accredited higher education providers and organizations that develop equipment, tools and infrastructure support for the delivery of online education.

The School of Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace University aspires to innovative leadership in preparing men and women for meaningful work, lifelong learning, and responsible participation in a new and dynamic information age. The School does this through a broad spectrum of educational programs on campuses in New York City and Westchester County and at other locations with community and corporate partners.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart International Airport in New Windsor. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School.

The National Science Foundation Awards Pace University $150,000 To Support Internet 2 Technologies

The National Science Foundation awarded Pace University $150,000 to support enhanced Internet technologies, “High Performance Network Connections for Science and Engineering Research: Internet 2 at Pace University.” Internet 2 is a new national high performance network initially intended for research, but with transformative potential for developing new ways of delivering and structuring teaching and learning through technology.

NEW YORK – The National Science Foundation awarded Pace University $150,000 to support enhanced Internet technologies, “High Performance Network Connections for Science and Engineering Research: Internet 2 at Pace University.” Internet 2 is a new national high performance network initially intended for research, but with transformative potential for developing new ways of delivering and structuring teaching and learning through technology.

Pace University’s initial Internet 2 project will be a course on the Middle Ages taught via the Internet in collaboration with Western Michigan University. Research is also underway for two projects at the School of Computer Science & Information Systems (CSIS), Collaborative Immersive Visualization and Common Wall: A Shared Collaborative Space. Future research projects under the grant also include: pervasive computing, virtual video conferencing, and enhanced student services for asynchronous distance learning.

“As a University with a School of Computer Science & Information Systems, Pace is uniquely positioned to contribute to further develop Internet 2 technologies and to facilitate transfer of these technologies to government industry and community,” said Dean Susan M. Merritt, dean of CSIS, “while at the same time enhancing the quality and availability of higher education for all of our students.”

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

Pace University Creates Online ListServ for Home Schooled Students

Pace University’s Center for Urban Education recently launched a ListServ aimed at helping home schooled teens and their parents negotiate what may seem like a maze of college admissions processes. Parents, students and school administrators can join the list by sending an email to scallaway@pace.edu.

Contact: Mary E. Horgan
(914) 923-2798
mhorgan@pace.edu

NEW YORK, NEW YORK, April 20, 2001– Pace University’s Center for Urban Education recently launched a ListServ aimed at helping home schooled teens and their parents negotiate what may seem like a maze of college admissions processes. Parents, students and school administrators can join the list by sending an email to scallaway@pace.edu

“The average high school sophomore or junior can rely on a school’s guidance office for information on college admissions requirements,” said Sean Callaway, Director of College Placement at the Center for Urban Education, part of the Pace School of Education, “but there are few reliable resources available for home schooled teens and their parents.”

There are about 1.4 million children in the United States who are home schooled. “The School of Education is interested in the education of all students and their equal access to college,” said Dean Jan McDonald. “We believe that it will provide an important service.”

Callaway, who home schools one of his six children, created the Home School and College Admissions ListServ which is co-sponsored by the School of Education’s Center for Urban Education and by the New York State Association for College Admission Counseling.

“Every family has a different reason for home schooling their children, but getting into college is a whole new ball game,” said Mr. Callaway. “A discussion group like this one might help level the playing field and provide these students with a roadmap to their future.”

The list is designed to offer parents who are home schooling a forum in which to pose questions about college entrance rules, requirements, testing and application processes to admissions professionals, and to afford admissions professionals the opportunity to learn about home schooling. Presently there are 500 subscribers of whom 20-25 percent are from colleges and 1-3 percent are from high schools.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

Lienhard School of Nursing to Deliver Online Courses to Brazilian Nurses

Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing (LSN) will be helping Brazilian nurses develop their home health care expertise through distance education. The Lienhard Center for Continuing Education recently teamed up with a Brazilian home health care provider, SAVE Enterprises, to deliver the online continuing education courses.

Contact: Mary E. Horgan
(914) 923-2798
mhorgan@pace.edu

Pleasantville, N. Y. – Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing (LSN) will be helping Brazilian nurses develop their home health care expertise through distance education. The Lienhard Center for Continuing Education recently teamed up with a Brazilian home health care provider, SAVE Enterprises, to deliver the online continuing education courses.

“New health care regulations in Brazil are driving sicker and sicker patients from the hospital to the home,” said Judy Vallarelli, director of the Lienhard Center for Continuing Education.

SAVE Enterprises, a Sao Paulo, Brazil-based forerunner in home health care, will offer the online courses that will be translated and delivered in Portuguese to their employees and market the courses to hospitals and other providers within the Sao Paulo Nursing Council. SAVE and Lienhard joined forces through Pace’s Center for International Business Development housed in the Lubin School of Business.

“From the start our intention was only to improve our professional team, but in view of the demand for qualified nursing professionals for the Brazilian market, we resolved to enter into an agreement with Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing to bring these relevant courses to Brazil,” said Dr. Helen Vervloet, president of SAVE.

The courses will be offered in three modules, Basic Home Health Care, Advanced Home Health Care and Pediatric Home Health Care. Nurses can register and attend classes online.

“In Brazil, nurses don’t have too much free time to go back to school, but they can turn to the Internet and get up to date in nursing issues. Long-distance courses are very important now, and I think here in Brazil it will be a way to reach professionals who want to keep learning,” said Maria Antonia de Andrade Dias, RN, vice president of the Brazilian Nursing Management Society and secretary of the Sao Paulo Nursing Council.

The Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University offers a number of degree programs including the 4-year BS program; the baccalaureate completion program for RNs; an accelerated RN/BS/MS for RN’s; combined degree BSN/MS program for non-nursing college graduates; master’s programs in case management, family nurse practitioner, psychiatric nurse practitioner, and nursing informatics; and a Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study option in each specialty. The LSN also has three centers: The Center for Nursing Research, Clinical Practice and International Affairs, the Center for Continuing Education in Nursing and Health Care, and the Learning Resource Center, that enrich the educational experience and support student learning.

Pace University’s Lubin School of Business Announces New e.MBA@Pace program To Commence January, 2000

Pace University’s Lubin School of Business will offer an online MBA
program that combines Internet-based learning with residencies for experienced
managers. This unique 24-month program is called e.MBA@Pace (pronounced
“e dot MBA at Pace”) and will be based on several large-scale projects and a
series of management skill modules. The first e.MBA class will begin in
January, 2000.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1696

NEW YORK-Pace University’s Lubin School of Business will offer an online MBA
program that combines Internet-based learning with residencies for experienced
managers. This unique 24-month program is called e.MBA@Pace (pronounced
“e dot MBA at Pace”) and will be based on several large-scale projects and a
series of management skill modules. The first e.MBA class will begin in
January, 2000.

The e.MBA@Pace program assigns projects, based on contemporary business
issues, to student teams. Team projects present student teams with complex
business problems that invite cross-disciplinary approaches for solution.
Examples of possible team projects include:

· Decide, as a manager of an American-based multinational, where to
locate new call centers to handle global call traffic.

· Develop a marketing plan for the expansion of a low-cost air
carrier into the NYC metropolitan area.

· Create a business plan to attract venture capital for a newly
developed, hand-held computing device that combines voice, e-mail,
fax, and data-base applications.

According to Lubin School Dean Arthur L. Centonze, the innovative new
educational structure adds to Pace University’s well-known full-time
and part-time graduate MBA programs, accredited by the AACSB, the
International Association for Management Education. Based on initial
inquiries, Lubin expects a significant demand for e.MBA@Pace among busy
executives and professionals who live a long distance from Pace’s
campuses or who travel extensively for business.

“Students will master traditional business tools, both qualitative and
quantitative, on a ‘need to know’ or ‘just in time’ basis,” said John
Dory, professor of management. “This approach to education, called
‘action learning’ or ‘outcome-based learning,’ has been highly effective
in complex business problem-solving situations.”

The students will also attend a series of 10 residencies at Pace
facilities during the 24 month degree program. The residencies will
allow for the presentation of project results, give program participants
time to work with faculty on individual assignments and enable faculty
to administer examinations. These face-to-face sessions will include
workshops on various management skills. Professor Dory notes that
candidates for the e.MBA@Pace program will have several years of
professional experience and a commitment to an innovative approach to
graduate business education. “To fluorish in the program, students must
be self-motivated, able to work independently and comfortable using the
Internet.”

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New
York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,000 students are enrolled
in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson
College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer
Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law,
Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

Students View Multimedia Presentations as an Effective Teaching Tool

Teachers who are looking for new, effective ways to reach students should consider going high-tech in the classroom. It seems the “MTV generation” prefers multimedia presentations over traditional chalkboard instructions, a new Pace University survey shows.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
NEW YORK — Teachers who are looking for new, effective ways to reach students should consider going high-tech in the classroom. It seems the “MTV generation” prefers multimedia presentations over traditional chalkboard instructions, a new Pace University survey shows.

Nearly 82 percent of the students surveyed felt that multimedia presentations increased their interest in the material and improved student-teacher interaction, said Psychology Professor Richard Velayo, who conducted the survey. Nearly 64 percent of the students felt that the multimedia format increased their understanding of the subject and helped them organize and take notes.

“Using multimedia presentations is an attempt to engage the students,” said Dr. Velayo, who incorporates computer-generated demonstrations with his lectures and class discussions. Dr. Velayo added that it is important to get students to actively interact with the material presented so they have a sense of control over their learning. He uses a laptop computer, CD-ROM, large-screen televisions, sound, pictures and, occasionally, films and videos to enhance his lectures.

Dr. Velayo surveyed 83 undergraduate and graduate students in his psychology courses on the use of multimedia technology in the classroom. A majority of the students say the computerized presentations enhance the lectures, but a few say it is more difficult to take notes and understand the material.

“Most students like this technology given its novelty,” Dr. Velayo said. “But if they perceive the material to be more interesting as well as promoting increased interaction, it will have a positive affect on their learning.” However, Dr. Velayo warned, this medium can be detrimental if students become passive observers in the process, as if watching television. The educational and social implications of this study’s findings certainly must be explored further, Dr. Velayo said.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law and Lienhard School of Nursing.