Nursing Spectrum: 3 paths to a DNP

Three nursing professional were highlighted in a story in Nursing Spectrum about overcoming obstacles to earn a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree, including Pace adjunct professor Anny Eusebio.

Three nursing professionals were highlighted in a story in Nursing Spectrum about overcoming obstacles to earn a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree, including Pace adjunct professor Anny Eusebio.

From Nursing Spectrum:

Family nurse practitioner Anny Eusebio, RN, DNP, FNP-BC, at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital’s primary care outpatient clinic at the Columbia campus and an adjunct professor at Pace University in New York, began her nursing career with a bachelor’s degree from Columbia University in New York City. She first received a bachelor’s in psychology but returned for a nursing degree. Then she practiced at The Mount Sinai Medical Center in Manhattan before transitioning to a school-based clinic as a special education substitute nurse.

Working per diem as a school nurse provided her time to return to Columbia University for her master’s degree and a career as a nurse practitioner. She was not satisfied with stopping her education mid-level, so Eusebio began toying with the idea of returning for a DNP.

“I saw changes in the healthcare environment and felt motivated to do it and to go for it,” Eusebio said.

Wanting the flexibility of taking some Internet-based courses, so she could be home with her 3-year-old son sometimes, led her to Pace University. NewYork-Presbyterian allowed Eusebio to take Friday’s off for in-person classes and reimbursed her tuition for the three-year DNP program. Even with family and employer support, she found the conflicting obligations a challenge.

“It’s quite a lot of multitasking, and you have to have organizational skills and prioritize,” she said, adding that she reached out to student colleagues to help her stay focused. “You get through it, and after you do, it’s such an accomplishment, a great feeling.”

Eusebio was attracted to the research elements of a doctorate degree. “I wanted to show how we quantify what we do, how we prove what we are doing is right or that we are doing excellent work,” she said. “I don’t think that is well documented, and nursing is taken for granted. I wanted to be involved and learn how to improve the nursing profession.”

Eusebio has used her new DNP knowledge to co-lead a nurse practitioner forum and is planning to collect data to demonstrate that NewYork-Presbyterian’s nurse practitioner-led anticoagulation clinic decreases patient complications and hospitalization readmissions.

Although she acknowledges a DNP degree is not for everyone, she said for her it made sense.

“We need to be able to propel the profession, and [a doctoral degree] was the only way I saw that could happen,” Eusebio said. “I wanted to be part of that.”

Read the full article: 3 paths to a DNP | New York Nursing News.

Lienhard School of Nursing “Admits” Harvey, A Lifelike Cardiovascular Simulator

Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing now has a permanent patient on staff. The school is the recipient of “Harvey,” a cardiopulmonary patient simulator, thanks to an $87,500 grant from the Hugoton Foundation.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:

Cara Cea, (914) 906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

LIENHARD SCHOOL OF NURSING “ADMITS” HARVEY, A LIFELIKE CARDIOVASCULAR SIMULATOR

NEW YORK, NY, May 14, 2010 – Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing now has a permanent patient on staff. The school is the recipient of “Harvey,” a cardiopulmonary patient simulator, thanks to an $87,500 grant from the Hugoton Foundation.

He’s not human, but Harvey is no dummy. He simulates 30 cardiac diseases with realistic heart and lung sounds at the touch of a button. He can be programmed to have various conditions that students diagnose and treat, such as hypertension, angina, myocardial infarct (“heart attack”), mitral valve prolapse, or a ventricular septal defect (“a hole in the heart”).

Harvey allows Pace University nursing students to practice their bedside diagnostic skills as often as they wish on him – and build confidence along the way. Increasingly nursing schools are turning to patient simulators to train students so they can practice on mannequins without fear of making fatal mistakes. The American College of Cardiology Task Force on Teaching recommends Harvey for training.

Although Harvey turned 42 this year, he is better than ever. The first Harvey simulators were heavy, weighing over 700 pounds. With his countless health issues he has helped train thousands of health care professionals at over 140 medical centers worldwide. With the trend toward shorter hospital stays, nursing students benefit from the continual presence of a patient who tolerates constant treatment and prodding.

The new slim, trim Harvey, weighing just 90 pounds, has undergone quite a few changes since he came on the scene in 1968. Harvey used to have a system of cams and levers that drove pistons to simulate his heartbeat and pulse. Today digital technology regulates Harvey’s heartbeat and pulse. With the addition of abnormal breath sounds, Harvey can now simulate a variety of pulmonary diseases. The newer Harvey also simulates additional cardiac disease states, has the ability to speak, and an interactive link to a multimedia computer curriculum in cardiology. The creators believe that Harvey will do for lung disease simulation what he already did for cardiac disease training.

According to dean and professor Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, “Harvey’s computer controlled simulation allows our advanced practice and entry-level nursing students to learn, practice and repeat procedures before performing them on real patients. Our students will get evidence-based learning experiences that are deeply meaningful while at the same time realistic and safe.”

Feldman noted that technology has transformed nursing education at Lienhard over the years and that Harvey will be in good company with a growing Lienhard family of several other patient simulators at Pace, along with equipment commonly found in a critical care unit or Emergency Room (ER): patient monitor, respirator, 12 lead EKG machine, multi-line IV pumps and a crash cart complete with defibrillator. Pace’s “Vital Sim” simulators have heart and lung sounds, blood pressure, arterial oxygenation levels, and even cough and groan like a real patient. This makes for a highly realistic “patient encounter” in the safe environment of the Learning Resource Center. “We are hoping to continue expansion of simulation learning as the field, and our student population, have grown,” Feldman said.

Professor Joanne Singleton, PhD, will work with aspiring family nurse practitioners to help them hone their skills on Harvey. She said, “Harvey is truly a lifesaver; he will help the nurses of tomorrow learn or improve skills and effective teamwork behaviors that will prevent health care errors that compromise patient safety. Mistakes can be made safely on Harvey that will help students learn without any negative outcomes on real people. Students who work with Harvey can learn at their own pace and be less likely to make health care errors when it counts – in a real-life situation.”

Assistant Professor Lucille Ferrara, EdD, will use Harvey for a pilot study in fall 2010 with nurse practitioner students to compare teaching methods. The study will examine high-fidelity simulation-based assessment, delivered via Harvey, versus more traditional teaching tools such as case studies. Both student and teacher perspectives will be explored. The results of this study will be critical as faculty in the family nurse practitioner program plan to transition from teaching with case studies to teaching in a more hands-on way with high fidelity (Harvey) simulation-based clinical skills assessment.

About Pace University: For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

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Fulbright Winner Aims to Remove Barriers to Quality Healthcare in Bangladesh

With much debate regarding healthcare systems worldwide, John J. Ringhisen, RN, a graduate of Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing, will study cultural and social barriers that prevent access to primary health care as a recipient of a 2010-2011 Fulbright Research Grant to South and Central Asia, Bangladesh.

PACE UNIVERSITY FULBRIGHT WINNER AIMS TO REMOVE BARRIERS TO QUALITY HEALTHCARE IN BANGLADESH

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contacts: Cara Cea, 914-773-3312 or ccea@pace.edu;
Sharon Lewis, 914-773-3973 or slewis2@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY FULBRIGHT WINNER AIMS TO REMOVE BARRIERS TO QUALITY HEALTHCARE IN BANGLADESH

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, April 28, 2010 – With much debate regarding healthcare systems worldwide, John J. Ringhisen, RN, a graduate of Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing, will study cultural and social barriers that prevent access to primary health care as a recipient of a 2010-2011 Fulbright Research Grant to South and Central Asia, Bangladesh.

Ringhisen will volunteer his services in Dhaka, Bangladesh for nine months beginning in August, as a registered nurse/participant observer in local primary health care centers and the communities they serve. In this role, Ringhisen will interview community and public health officials to collect their opinions on what prevents their target groups from participating.

Ringhisen hopes to bring back some important lessons that can be applied to our healthcare system in the U.S. “Accessibility to healthcare is critical. More attention needs to be paid to rural and isolated populations. Instead of a healthcare clinic spending money on new equipment, perhaps door-to-door van service can be provided so families without any means of transportation can get the medical attention they need. I would advocate securing a grant to provide a ‘clinic on wheels’ that would come into the rural communities to help with basic healthcare needs such as vaccinations and wellness exams to avoid the potentially long travel time to healthcare facilities. There are existing programs that focus on specialties such as Outreach Mobile Eye Clinics (OMEC) out of Australia. Even more important, however, is to create a system of hard site clinics as logistical support hubs so that these mobile clinics can stay in the field longer, probe deeper into remote areas, and offer more emergent care if needed.”

The Wichita, KS native graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1999 with a bachelor of science degree in physics and minor in electrical engineering. Upon graduation, he received a commission as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army’s Finance Corps. John served in Seoul, South Korea and supported operations in Bosnia, Kosovo, and Iraq until his honorable discharge in 2003.

After working as an office manager and comptroller for several small businesses and a private dental practice, John realized his future in healthcare through Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing Combined Degree Program (CDP). In 2008 John was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation New Careers in Nursing Scholar. He graduated in December 2009 with a bachelor of science degree in Nursing and received his New York State Registered Professional Nursing License in March 2010.

Ringhisen interacted with patients from diverse backgrounds while working in the emergency room at Westchester Medical Center and with the Visiting Nurse Association of the Hudson Valley.

“John tells us he was inspired by the classes he took in the CDP, particularly those that focused on cultural competency in nursing,” said Lienhard dean Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN. “He was able to apply what he was learning about cultural competence in the classroom in a hands-on, practical way and wondered how other countries fared with their healthcare systems, especially those in the developing world.“

Ringhisen is learning Bengali and Hindi in preparation for his departure to Bangladesh. He also speaks intermediate Spanish and Arabic, and beginner Hangul (Korean).

Martha Greenberg, PhD, R.N., Associate Professor and Chairperson Undergraduate Nursing Studies, said, “From the first day of meeting him, John stood out as a leader among this peers. John is a decorated Veteran of the United States military. He is articulate, well read, a nursing scholar, kind and compassionate to his peers and colleagues, and a leader. He has a proven track record of adapting to different cultural environments having served in Iraq. Finally, he is committed to working with underserved people to improve their health and be a change agent not only abroad but locally, nationally and globally.”

According to Dr. Lillie M. Shortridge-Baggett, EdD, RN, FAAN “John is Lienhard School of Nursing’s second Fulbright scholar; our first is Patty Sayre, and both are exceptional students. We are very proud of their success.”

Ringhisen is married to the former Melissa Grider of Lombard, IL, a Major and a full time professor and scholarship advisor with the Department of Social Sciences at West Point. Ringhisen says, “She has two Rhodes Scholars, one East-West, two Truman Scholars, nine Rotary, and two National Science Foundation Scholars to mentor and assist with their own overseas studies. The joke in the house right now is whether or not she gets to ‘claim’ me as her one Fulbright Scholar since she helped with my application process.” The couple has two sons, John Patrick age 7 and Trevor Alfred age 3. While Ringhisen is in Bangladesh, his family will remain in the U.S., staying at West Point with an extensive support system.

About the Fulbright Program: The Fulbright program is the flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the United States government and is designed to increase mutual understanding between the people of the US and the people of other countries. The Fulbright program provides participants – chosen for their academic merit and leadership potential – with the opportunity to study, teach and conduct research, exchange ideas and contribute to finding solutions to shared international concerns.

About Pace University: For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV