Lienhard School of Nursing “Admits” Harvey, A Lifelike Cardiovascular Simulator

Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing now has a permanent patient on staff. The school is the recipient of “Harvey,” a cardiopulmonary patient simulator, thanks to an $87,500 grant from the Hugoton Foundation.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:

Cara Cea, (914) 906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

LIENHARD SCHOOL OF NURSING “ADMITS” HARVEY, A LIFELIKE CARDIOVASCULAR SIMULATOR

NEW YORK, NY, May 14, 2010 – Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing now has a permanent patient on staff. The school is the recipient of “Harvey,” a cardiopulmonary patient simulator, thanks to an $87,500 grant from the Hugoton Foundation.

He’s not human, but Harvey is no dummy. He simulates 30 cardiac diseases with realistic heart and lung sounds at the touch of a button. He can be programmed to have various conditions that students diagnose and treat, such as hypertension, angina, myocardial infarct (“heart attack”), mitral valve prolapse, or a ventricular septal defect (“a hole in the heart”).

Harvey allows Pace University nursing students to practice their bedside diagnostic skills as often as they wish on him – and build confidence along the way. Increasingly nursing schools are turning to patient simulators to train students so they can practice on mannequins without fear of making fatal mistakes. The American College of Cardiology Task Force on Teaching recommends Harvey for training.

Although Harvey turned 42 this year, he is better than ever. The first Harvey simulators were heavy, weighing over 700 pounds. With his countless health issues he has helped train thousands of health care professionals at over 140 medical centers worldwide. With the trend toward shorter hospital stays, nursing students benefit from the continual presence of a patient who tolerates constant treatment and prodding.

The new slim, trim Harvey, weighing just 90 pounds, has undergone quite a few changes since he came on the scene in 1968. Harvey used to have a system of cams and levers that drove pistons to simulate his heartbeat and pulse. Today digital technology regulates Harvey’s heartbeat and pulse. With the addition of abnormal breath sounds, Harvey can now simulate a variety of pulmonary diseases. The newer Harvey also simulates additional cardiac disease states, has the ability to speak, and an interactive link to a multimedia computer curriculum in cardiology. The creators believe that Harvey will do for lung disease simulation what he already did for cardiac disease training.

According to dean and professor Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, “Harvey’s computer controlled simulation allows our advanced practice and entry-level nursing students to learn, practice and repeat procedures before performing them on real patients. Our students will get evidence-based learning experiences that are deeply meaningful while at the same time realistic and safe.”

Feldman noted that technology has transformed nursing education at Lienhard over the years and that Harvey will be in good company with a growing Lienhard family of several other patient simulators at Pace, along with equipment commonly found in a critical care unit or Emergency Room (ER): patient monitor, respirator, 12 lead EKG machine, multi-line IV pumps and a crash cart complete with defibrillator. Pace’s “Vital Sim” simulators have heart and lung sounds, blood pressure, arterial oxygenation levels, and even cough and groan like a real patient. This makes for a highly realistic “patient encounter” in the safe environment of the Learning Resource Center. “We are hoping to continue expansion of simulation learning as the field, and our student population, have grown,” Feldman said.

Professor Joanne Singleton, PhD, will work with aspiring family nurse practitioners to help them hone their skills on Harvey. She said, “Harvey is truly a lifesaver; he will help the nurses of tomorrow learn or improve skills and effective teamwork behaviors that will prevent health care errors that compromise patient safety. Mistakes can be made safely on Harvey that will help students learn without any negative outcomes on real people. Students who work with Harvey can learn at their own pace and be less likely to make health care errors when it counts – in a real-life situation.”

Assistant Professor Lucille Ferrara, EdD, will use Harvey for a pilot study in fall 2010 with nurse practitioner students to compare teaching methods. The study will examine high-fidelity simulation-based assessment, delivered via Harvey, versus more traditional teaching tools such as case studies. Both student and teacher perspectives will be explored. The results of this study will be critical as faculty in the family nurse practitioner program plan to transition from teaching with case studies to teaching in a more hands-on way with high fidelity (Harvey) simulation-based clinical skills assessment.

About Pace University: For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

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Fulbright Winner Aims to Remove Barriers to Quality Healthcare in Bangladesh

With much debate regarding healthcare systems worldwide, John J. Ringhisen, RN, a graduate of Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing, will study cultural and social barriers that prevent access to primary health care as a recipient of a 2010-2011 Fulbright Research Grant to South and Central Asia, Bangladesh.

PACE UNIVERSITY FULBRIGHT WINNER AIMS TO REMOVE BARRIERS TO QUALITY HEALTHCARE IN BANGLADESH

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contacts: Cara Cea, 914-773-3312 or ccea@pace.edu;
Sharon Lewis, 914-773-3973 or slewis2@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY FULBRIGHT WINNER AIMS TO REMOVE BARRIERS TO QUALITY HEALTHCARE IN BANGLADESH

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, April 28, 2010 – With much debate regarding healthcare systems worldwide, John J. Ringhisen, RN, a graduate of Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing, will study cultural and social barriers that prevent access to primary health care as a recipient of a 2010-2011 Fulbright Research Grant to South and Central Asia, Bangladesh.

Ringhisen will volunteer his services in Dhaka, Bangladesh for nine months beginning in August, as a registered nurse/participant observer in local primary health care centers and the communities they serve. In this role, Ringhisen will interview community and public health officials to collect their opinions on what prevents their target groups from participating.

Ringhisen hopes to bring back some important lessons that can be applied to our healthcare system in the U.S. “Accessibility to healthcare is critical. More attention needs to be paid to rural and isolated populations. Instead of a healthcare clinic spending money on new equipment, perhaps door-to-door van service can be provided so families without any means of transportation can get the medical attention they need. I would advocate securing a grant to provide a ‘clinic on wheels’ that would come into the rural communities to help with basic healthcare needs such as vaccinations and wellness exams to avoid the potentially long travel time to healthcare facilities. There are existing programs that focus on specialties such as Outreach Mobile Eye Clinics (OMEC) out of Australia. Even more important, however, is to create a system of hard site clinics as logistical support hubs so that these mobile clinics can stay in the field longer, probe deeper into remote areas, and offer more emergent care if needed.”

The Wichita, KS native graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1999 with a bachelor of science degree in physics and minor in electrical engineering. Upon graduation, he received a commission as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army’s Finance Corps. John served in Seoul, South Korea and supported operations in Bosnia, Kosovo, and Iraq until his honorable discharge in 2003.

After working as an office manager and comptroller for several small businesses and a private dental practice, John realized his future in healthcare through Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing Combined Degree Program (CDP). In 2008 John was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation New Careers in Nursing Scholar. He graduated in December 2009 with a bachelor of science degree in Nursing and received his New York State Registered Professional Nursing License in March 2010.

Ringhisen interacted with patients from diverse backgrounds while working in the emergency room at Westchester Medical Center and with the Visiting Nurse Association of the Hudson Valley.

“John tells us he was inspired by the classes he took in the CDP, particularly those that focused on cultural competency in nursing,” said Lienhard dean Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN. “He was able to apply what he was learning about cultural competence in the classroom in a hands-on, practical way and wondered how other countries fared with their healthcare systems, especially those in the developing world.“

Ringhisen is learning Bengali and Hindi in preparation for his departure to Bangladesh. He also speaks intermediate Spanish and Arabic, and beginner Hangul (Korean).

Martha Greenberg, PhD, R.N., Associate Professor and Chairperson Undergraduate Nursing Studies, said, “From the first day of meeting him, John stood out as a leader among this peers. John is a decorated Veteran of the United States military. He is articulate, well read, a nursing scholar, kind and compassionate to his peers and colleagues, and a leader. He has a proven track record of adapting to different cultural environments having served in Iraq. Finally, he is committed to working with underserved people to improve their health and be a change agent not only abroad but locally, nationally and globally.”

According to Dr. Lillie M. Shortridge-Baggett, EdD, RN, FAAN “John is Lienhard School of Nursing’s second Fulbright scholar; our first is Patty Sayre, and both are exceptional students. We are very proud of their success.”

Ringhisen is married to the former Melissa Grider of Lombard, IL, a Major and a full time professor and scholarship advisor with the Department of Social Sciences at West Point. Ringhisen says, “She has two Rhodes Scholars, one East-West, two Truman Scholars, nine Rotary, and two National Science Foundation Scholars to mentor and assist with their own overseas studies. The joke in the house right now is whether or not she gets to ‘claim’ me as her one Fulbright Scholar since she helped with my application process.” The couple has two sons, John Patrick age 7 and Trevor Alfred age 3. While Ringhisen is in Bangladesh, his family will remain in the U.S., staying at West Point with an extensive support system.

About the Fulbright Program: The Fulbright program is the flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the United States government and is designed to increase mutual understanding between the people of the US and the people of other countries. The Fulbright program provides participants – chosen for their academic merit and leadership potential – with the opportunity to study, teach and conduct research, exchange ideas and contribute to finding solutions to shared international concerns.

About Pace University: For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Lienhard Spring Scholarly Colloquium Part of Grassroots Movement to Make 2010 Year of the Nurse

Noted international nurse historian, Patricia D’Antonio, Ph.D., Associate Professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, will speak at Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing spring scholarly colloquium on Monday, March 8 in Pleasantville, NY. The colloquium is part of a grassroots international movement that has declared 2010 the Year of the Nurse to raise awareness of the critical role nurses play and to commemorate the 100th anniversary of famed nurse Florence Nightingale’s death.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact:

Sharon Lewis, Lienhard School of Nursing, (914) 773-3973, slewis2@pace.edu

Cara Cea, (914) 906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

SCHOLARLY COLLOQUIUM RECOGNIZES FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE AS FOUNDER OF MODERN NURSING

Noted nurse historian Patricia D’Antonio to keynote

Part of grassroots movement to make 2010 the Year of the Nurse

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, March 5, 2010 – Noted international nurse historian, Patricia D’Antonio, Ph.D., Associate Professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, will speak at Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing spring scholarly colloquium on Monday, March 8 in Pleasantville, NY. The colloquium is part of a grassroots international movement that has declared 2010 the Year of the Nurse to raise awareness of the critical role nurses play and to commemorate the 100th anniversary of famed nurse Florence Nightingale’s death.

The event will take place from 11:30am – 2:30pm in the Butcher Suite in the Kessel Student Center, entrance 3, 861 Bedford Rd.

D’Antonio’s talk, “Florence Nightingale: Myth and Meaning” is based on her latest book titled, “American Nursing: A History of Knowledge, Authority and the Meaning of Work.” According to Lienhard professor Sandra B. Lewenson, Ed.D., RN, FAAN, the event will “raise questions about nursing’s invisibility and nursing’s historical role in health care reform efforts. As the current debate over health care reform makes daily headlines, it is important to remember that Nightingale was a major reformer. There is this image of her, a myth really, of ‘the lady with the lamp’ — the reality is that Nightingale was a reformer who made major changes; she was the founder of the modern nursing movement.”

For more information, or to RSVP, please contact Sharon Lewis slewis2@pace.edu or Cara Cea at ccea@pace.edu.

About Lienhard: The Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University increased its enrollment in 2009-2010 by about 70 students, the fourth year with such an increase. In recent years it has won over $5 million in federal and private grants. Lienhard’s Family Nurse Practitioner program is ranked ninth nationally in the U.S. News & World Report survey of America’s Best Graduate Schools; last year the school added a doctoral program. Harriet R. Feldman, Ph.D., the dean, is a nurse who has emerged as a national authority on three major trends that are changing the nursing profession – the shortage of nurses and nurse educators, the involvement of nurses in promoting health policy, and the promotion of evidence-based procedures in nursing education and practice. With a Ph.D. in nursing science from New York University, she has published more than 90 books, chapters and articles and testified before Congress. In the national discussion of health care reform, she is a strong advocate of using nurse practitioners to meet the increasing need for expanding primary care delivery to focus on health promotion and maintenance and the management of chronic illness.

About Pace University: For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Health Care Experts Weigh in on Reform Debate and New Cancer Screening Guidelines

Primary care nurses and nurse educators at Pace University’s rapidly-growing Lienhard School of Nursing have informed views on the current news about healthcare reform and guidelines for breast and cervical cancer screening.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Sharon Lewis, Lienhard School of Nursing, (914) 773-3973, slewis2@pace.edu Cara Cea, (914) 906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

EXPERT NURSES AVAILABLE TO COMMENT ON WAYS TO INCREASE PRIMARY CARE IN FEDERAL HEALTH CARE REFORM

AND NEW CANCER SCREENING GUIDELINES

Nurse practitioners best group to handle increasing need for primary care, says dean of nursing school; Nursing practice should not change yet, say Pace University experts

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, December 2009 – Primary care nurses and nurse educators at Pace University’s rapidly-growing Lienhard School of Nursing have informed views on the current news about healthcare reform and guidelines for breast and cervical cancer screening.

All can be reached directly at the numbers below as well as through media contacts above.

Nurse practitioners are ready to meet increased demand for primary care: Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN

Dean of the Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University, Feldman has emerged as a national authority on three major trends that are changing the nursing profession – the shortage of nurses and nurse educators, the involvement of nurses in promoting health policy, and the promotion of evidence-based procedures in education and nursing practice. With a PhD in nursing science from New York University, she has published more than 90 books, chapters and articles and testified before Congress. Her school’s enrollment is up this fall by about 80 students, the fourth year with such an increase; in recent years the school has been awarded over $5 million in federal and private grants. Lienhard’s Family Nurse Practitioner Program is ranked ninth nationally in the U.S. News & World Report survey of “America’s Best Graduate Schools 2008;” last year the school added a doctor of nursing practice program. Feldman is on US Representative Nita Lowey’s (D-NY) Health Advisory Committee and a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and of the New York Academy of Medicine. Feldman is also the 2009 chair of the Board of Commissioners of the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), the national nonprofit agency that exclusively accredits baccalaureate and higher degree programs in nursing.

Feldman says: “A major tenet of the proposed Health Care Reform legislation is to expand primary care delivery to focus on health promotion and maintenance and the management of chronic illness. The current plan very properly envisions using nurse practitioners to meet the increasing need and I cannot think of a more appropriate group of professionals.

With a focus on preventive care, nurse practitioners have been delivering primary care in a variety of inpatient, outpatient, and community settings in for over 40 years. While primary care physicians’ numbers are down 30%, the number of programs preparing nurse practitioners has been increasing annually in recent years to meet growing demand and expand the nursing workforce. There are now 323 programs that prepare students to join the workforce of 2.9 million nurse practitioners.” Nurse practitioners are registered nurses with advanced preparation and qualified to prescribe medication.

Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN Dean and Professor, Pace University Lienhard School of Nursing Interim Dean, School of Education Phone: (914)-773-3342 Fax: (914)-773-3480 Email: hfeldman@pace.edu

Don’t move too fast: Andrea Sonenberg, NP, CNM, DNSc

Assistant Professor Andrea Sonenberg, a nurse practitioner and certified nurse midwife with a doctorate from Columbia, is an expert in women’s health and in the regulation of advanced nursing practice and global use of Advanced-Practice Nurses (APNs) for vulnerable populations.

Sonenberg thinks it would be premature for APNs to change their cancer screening practices yet. She also recognizes that throughout history, periodic changes in guidelines for breast self-examination and the use of PAP smears have taken place as new evidence was uncovered and weighed by expert panels and organizations, and that these changes are always informed by dialogues beginning prior to their announcements.

She stresses that recommendations that may be made by the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) will be directed at routine screening schedules for low risk women. “Each provider must determine a client’s risk individually,” Sonenberg says.

She adds: “The fact that the USPSTF has a different membership than it did when the previous recommendations were made seven years ago is less relevant, in my view, than the fact that there is new evidence on which to base revised recommendations.”

On health care reform: “I would also like to caution against trying to link these new recommendations to the health care reform debate. I believe the timing is coincidental. Review of evidence by USPSTF is ongoing. Some believe that these recommendations are meant to save money for insurance companies, and therefore the health care system on the whole. It worries me that this belief could spread and lead us down a dangerous path regarding primary care and prevention.”

Andrea Sonenberg, NP, CNM, DNSc Assistant Professor, Pace University Lienhard School of Nursing 861 Bedford Road Pleasantville, New York 10570 Phone: (914) 773-3534 Fax: (914) 773-3345 E-mail: asonenberg@pace.edu

Still recommending mammograms: Audrey Hoover, MS, RN, FNP, WHNP

Audrey Hoover, MS, RN, FNP, WHNP, a family nurse practitioner who specializes in family and women’s health, is also taking a cautious approach to breast cancer screening and will carefully weigh all the information before changing her practice. She says, “This is very new data…. we are continuing to recommend mammograms for women at 40.”

Regarding PAP smears, Hoover recalls the overzealous screening and treatment of adolescents a few years ago that turned out to be unnecessary. Human papillomavirus (HPV) may increase the risk for cervical cancer and for abnormal PAP smears in certain women, depending on age. “We now know that he HPV virus tends to clear by about age 26,” says Hoover. “Early data analysis on the virus and recommendations on the treatment for it were premature.” Hoover is considering recommending new American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologist guidelines for PAP smears every two years starting at age 21, and every three years after age 30 for women who have had three consecutive negative PAP smears.

Hoover is associate director of University Health Care at Pace University which offers a full range of primary care services to the Pace community.

Audrey P. Hoover, FNP Family Nurse Practitioner and Associate Director Pace University Health Care NY Campus 41 Park Row, Rm 313 New York, NY 10038 Phone: 212 346-1600 Fax: 212 348-1308 E-mail: ahoover@pace.edu

About Pace University: For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Professor Karen “Toby” Haghenbeck Honored for 30 Years of Service as a Critical Care Nurse

Toby Haghenbeck, Assistant Professor at Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University in Pleasantville, NY recently received national recognition for reaching a significant milestone in the nursing profession: Since 1979 she has consistently maintained CCRN® certification offered through AACN Certification Corporation. Toby Haghenbeck is one of 108 CCRNs being honored this year by the corporation and the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses for 30 years of continuous certification.

Posted on behalf of The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY FACULTY MEMBER RECOGNIZED FOR CAREER MILESTONE AS CRITICAL CARE NURSE

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, August 10, 2009 – Toby Haghenbeck, Assistant Professor at Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University in Pleasantville, NY recently received national recognition for reaching a significant milestone in the nursing profession: Since 1979 she has consistently maintained CCRN® certification offered through AACN Certification Corporation. Toby Haghenbeck is one of 108 CCRNs being honored this year by the corporation and the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses for 30 years of continuous certification.

CCRN certification is an expert credential reserved for those who meet rigorous practice, continuing education and testing requirements in their specialty; it is not the same as an RN license, which assures the public that a nurse has the required entry-level knowledge and skills to care for patients. Certification has been linked to fewer medical errors and increased job satisfaction and confidence. Hospitals that encourage and support their nurses in becoming certified demonstrate to their patients a high level of commitment to creating an exceptional care environment and, to their nurses, a culture of professionalism and retention imperative in today’s healthcare environment.

Professor Haghenbeck has also been appointed as Director of the RN4 program at Lienhard, effective fall 2009. The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) is the largest specialty nursing organization in the world, representing the interests of more than 400,000 critical care nurses. Its international headquarters are located in Aliso Viejo, Calif. Founded in 1969, the association has more than 240 chapters worldwide and is working toward a healthcare system driven by the needs of patients and their families, where critical care nurses make their optimal contribution. Complete information about AACN is available on the Internet at www.aacn.org.

AACN Certification Corporation provides comprehensive credentials for nurses who establish and maintain standards of excellence in acute and critical care nursing and who contribute to the achievement of optimal health outcomes for persons experiencing acute and life-threatening illness. The Corporation certifies more than 50,000 nurses in the areas of acute and critical care nursing.

Dean Feldman Named Chair of National Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education

At a time of enormous demand for nurses, Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, a Bellmore, NY resident and dean of Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing since 1993, has been re-elected the 2009 chair of the Board of Commissioners of the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), the national nonprofit agency that exclusively accredits baccalaureate and higher degree programs in nursing.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Cara Halstead Cea, Public Information, Pace University 914-773-3312 (Office), 914-906-9680 (Cell) chalstead@pace.edu

Photo editors: a 300 dpi jpeg head shot of Dean Feldman and photographs of her with students are available through Cara Halstead Cea (above).

Influential role for influential dean DEAN OF PACE UNIVERSITY’S LIENHARD SCHOOL OF NURSING NAMED CHAIR OF NATIONAL COMMISSION ON COLLEGIATE NURSING EDUCATION

Harriet R. Feldman also gets accepted to Harvard program

NEW YORK, NY – At a time of enormous demand for nurses, Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, a Bellmore, NY resident and dean of Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing since 1993, has been re-elected the 2009 chair of the Board of Commissioners of the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), the national nonprofit agency that exclusively accredits baccalaureate and higher degree programs in nursing.

She has also been chosen as a member of Harvard’s Institute for Management and Leadership in Education (MLE) Class of 2009 to be held from June 14–26, 2009.

During Feldman’s leadership of the organization, CCNE has: • Amended the standards for accreditation of baccalaureate and graduate degree nursing programs to address baccalaureate and master’s degree nursing programs, as well as Doctor of Nursing Practice programs. • Trained a cadre of over 100 new on-site evaluators to serve as volunteer peer reviewers in the CCNE accreditation process. • Participated as an organizational member in the advanced practice nursing consensus work group and endorsed the resulting consensus model for advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) regulation which includes licensure, accreditation, certification and education. • Amended the procedures for accreditation of baccalaureate and graduate degree nursing programs to address baccalaureate and master’s degree nursing programs, as well as Doctor of Nursing Practice programs. • Re-trained all active CCNE evaluators to the amended Standards and Procedures.

Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing is among the first institutions in the nation to receive funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) through the RWJF New Careers in Nursing Scholarship Program. Grants provided through this program are being used to increase the number of students enrolled in Lienhard’s accelerated baccalaureate nursing program, the Combined Degree Program (CDP). This national initiative, launched by RWJF and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), aims to help alleviate the nation’s nursing shortage by dramatically expanding the pipeline of students in accelerated nursing programs. The LSN received a $120,000 grant that will allow the school to award twelve scholarships of $10,000 each to students who are “underrepresented” in nursing and enroll in the CDP in spring 2009.

Bottlenecks and politics. Feldman is emerging as a national authority on three major trends that are changing the nursing profession – the shortage of nurses and nurse educators, the involvement of nurses in promoting health policy, and the promotion of evidence-based procedures in education and nursing practice.

Feldman has published more than 90 books, book chapters, refereed journal articles, and editorials that have focused on leadership, the nursing and faculty shortages, the role of nurses in the political arena, and evidence-based practice. She has especially spoken out on the nursing shortage and the bottleneck to educating more nurses that is being created by a parallel shortage of nursing faculty members.

Under her direction, the Lienhard School was a leader in a consortium of health-related institutions in New York’s Hudson Valley that in 2005 won a $1.03 million US Labor Department grant to help open that bottleneck. The funds provide monetary credits to healthcare facilities in exchange for loaning Master’s-prepared nurses to teach clinical courses, thereby making it possible to enroll greater numbers of nursing students

Partly as a result, the Lienhard School’s enrollment is up this fall by about 70 students, the fourth year with such an increase. Lienhard’s Family Nurse Practitioner Program is ranked ninth nationally in the U.S. News & World Report survey of “America’s Best Graduate Schools 2008.” Building on this reputation, the Lienhard School started a new Doctor of Nursing Practice program in September 2008 to address the need for practitioners with the most advanced level of clinical nursing practice in which they will design, implement, evaluate and continuously improve health care delivery and outcomes.

Feldman has testified in Congress and written numerous articles and letters to editors on nursing policy, becoming a nationally known figure both within her field and in the media. For her legislative work in addressing the shortage, she received the “STAR” award for grassroots political advocacy from the Association of American Colleges of Nursing.

Prized books. In the last six years, Feldman has edited four award-winning books. “Nurses in the Political Arena: The Public Face of Nursing” (2000), with Sandra Lewenson, EdD, RN, FAAN received an American Journal of Nursing (AJN) Book of the Year award and a Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Print Media Award. That was soon followed by “The Nursing Shortage: Strategies for Recruitment and Retention in Clinical Practice and Education” (2003), “Educating Nurses for Leadership” (2005, with Martha J. Greenberg, PhD, RN), and “Teaching Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing” (2006, with Rona F. Levin, PhD, RN), all three of which also received AJN Book of the Year awards.

Feldman is on US Representative Nita Lowey’s (D-NY) Health Advisory Committee and an active emeritus member on the board of Nurses Educational Fund, Inc. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and a Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine, and past editor of the journals Nursing Leadership Forum and Scholarly Inquiry for Nursing Practice.

She received her BS and MS degrees in nursing from Adelphi University and her PhD in nursing science from New York University.

About Pace. For 101 years Pace University has combined exceptional academics with professional experiences and the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York enrolling more than 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

Lienhard School Wins Nearly $1 Million to Enhance New Nursing Doctoral Program

At a time when the US population is increasingly diverse and quality patient outcomes and patient safety are hot topics in health care, Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing has won a three-year federal grant of nearly $1 million to enhance its new doctoral program in the areas of cultural competence and evidence-based practice.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Cara Halstead Cea, 914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu or Joanne K. Singleton, PhD, 212-346-1903, jsingleton@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF NURSING WINS FEDERAL GRANT OF NEARLY $1 MILLION TO ENHANCE TRAINING IN MULTICULTURAL ISSUES, PRACTICES BASED ON RESEARCH $900,439 grant from U.S.

Department of Health and Human Services will deepen new doctoral program’s emphasis on primary care for underserved populations

NEW YORK, NY – At a time when the US population is increasingly diverse and quality patient outcomes and patient safety are hot topics in health care, Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing has won a three-year federal grant of nearly $1 million to enhance its new doctoral program in the areas of cultural competence and evidence-based practice.

According to Lienhard Dean Harriet R. Feldman, the changes will help keep Lienhard “a step ahead of the rest” in the burgeoning national effort to make sure students are prepared to address the needs of diverse populations using the best available evidence. The award comes from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services under its Advanced Education Nursing Grant program. The grant will help provide curriculum enhancements for the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program that Lienhard announced this spring.

The enhancements will focus on increasing student and faculty expertise in the areas of cultural competence and evidence-based practice improvement. The DNP program is intended to educate students’ to reach the highest level of clinical practice in nursing. Currently, all enrolled students are Family Nurse Practitioners (FNPs). The first class of 24 enters this fall. Lienhard’s FNP program is ranked ninth in the nation by US News & World Report.

Both DNP faculty members and students will get additional training in cultural awareness and sensitivity, producing what has come to be known as “cultural competence.”

Instruction will expand in delivering primary care that draws on scientific evidence, one aspect of “evidence-based practice,” or EBP.

The training will focus especially on vulnerable groups. Feldman co-edited a recent book on the subject with Lienhard graduate chair, Rona F. Levin, “EBP is based on the idea that nurses can contribute to the development of a scientific base for nursing practice by critiquing and questioning standard guidelines, treatments and outcomes. It empowers nurses on the front lines to fix problems.”

Team leaders. National healthcare accrediting bodies including The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and The Joint Commission are urging healthcare organizations to assess their capacity to meet patients’ cultural needs not only with training, but with such care components as language services, religious and spiritual care, and special diets.

“This focus of this grant will help distinguish our Doctor of Nursing Practice program from the others. And the skills of cultural competence and evidence-based practice are what employers tell us they are looking for,” said Feldman.

Added Joanne K. Singleton, Ph.D., the Director of the FNP-DNP program and the Project Director for the grant, “Our students will be challenged to learn how to design, deliver and lead interdisciplinary primary health care teams in developing and implementing culturally-competent best practices. We expect our graduates to make significant contributions to the overall health of our nation, which will include addressing national health disparities.”

About the Lienhard School of Nursing: With classrooms and laboratories in culturally diverse urban and suburban settings, Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing is committed to innovation and excellence in education, research, and practice in primary health care. It has nearly doubled in size over the last five years, and now has more than 700 students enrolled in baccalaureate and master’s degree programs, all approved by the New York State Education Department and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. Lienhard partners with communities to foster human growth and dignity and provide primary care, and is devoted to preparing individuals, families, and communities at local, national, and international levels to meet health care demands now and in the future. Professional education at Pace University: Since 1906 Pace University has offered professional education that combines liberal arts with practical experience and the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York. It enrolls more than 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

New Doctor of Nursing Practice Degree Puts Pace University on Forefront of National Movement

Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing recently became one of only three institutions approved by New York State to offer a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree. The others are Columbia University and the University of Rochester.

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Contact:
Cara Halstead Cea, Pace University
914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu

NEW DOCTOR OF NURSING PRACTICE DEGREE PUTS PACE UNIVERSITY ON FOREFRONT OF NEW NATIONAL MOVEMENT IN NURSING EDUCATION

Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing becomes one of only three colleges in NY State to offer the degree

Level of preparation for advanced nursing practice roles is transitioning from masters to doctorate by 2015

NEW YORK, NY – Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing recently became one of only three institutions approved by New York State to offer a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree. The others are Columbia University and the University of Rochester.

The new DNP program will prepare nurses for the highest level of nursing practice. The degree is designed for those in advanced levels of direct clinical practice and in areas that support clinical practice administration, organizational management and leadership, and policy development.

Recruitment for the fall DNP program has begun. The school is accepting inquiries and applications at nursing@pace.edu, or (914) 773-3552.

A trend to change. Across the nation, nursing is moving in the direction of other health professions in the transition to the DNP. In October 2004, the members of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), the major voice of baccalaureate and higher degree nursing education programs, called for moving the level of preparation necessary for advanced nursing practice (ANP) roles from the master’s degree to the doctorate level by 2015. The AACN now recommends DNP programs for educating APNs and other nurses seeking top clinical positions. In 2005, the National Academy of Sciences also called for nursing to develop a non-research, clinical doctorate to prepare expert practitioners who can also serve as clinical faculty members, a need that the new DNP addresses.

DNP graduates will likely fill practice-leadership roles in a variety of settings, becoming managers of quality initiatives, executives in healthcare organizations, directors of clinical programs, and faculty members responsible for clinical program delivery and clinical teaching.

Research has established a clear link between higher levels of nursing education and better patient outcomes. According to the AACN, changing demands in health care require that nurses serving in specialty positions have the highest possible levels of scientific knowledge and practice expertise. These changes include: increased use of evidence-based practice, increasing complexity of patient care, rising national concerns about quality of care and patient safety, the national nursing shortage and shortages of doctorally prepared nursing faculty members to teach new nurses, and increasing educational expectations for the preparation of other health professionals.

Impact on nursing education and practice. Currently, advanced practice nurses, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, nurse midwives, and nurse anesthetists, are typically prepared in master’s degree programs, some of which carry a credit load equivalent to doctoral degrees in the other health professions. DNP curricula build on current master’s programs by providing education in areas including evidence-based practice, quality improvement, and systems thinking.

The DNP focuses especially on providing leadership for evidence-based practice. This requires competence in translating research into practice, evaluating evidence, applying research in decision-making, and implementing viable clinical innovations to change practices. DNP-prepared nurses will work alongside nurse researchers prepared in PhD, DNSc and other research-focused nursing doctorates to advance the science and practice of nursing.
About the Lienhard School of Nursing: With classrooms and laboratories in culturally diverse urban and suburban settings, Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing (LSN) is committed to innovation and excellence in education, research, and practice in primary health care. With more than 600 students enrolled in baccalaureate and master’s degree programs, all approved by the New York State Education Department and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, LSN partners with communities to foster human growth and dignity and provide primary care. The School is devoted to preparing individuals, families, and communities at local, national, and international levels to meet health care demands now and in the future.

About Pace University: For 101 years Pace University has combined exceptional academics with professional experiences and the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Lienhard’s Dean Feldman Named Chair of Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education and Honored at NYU

At a time of enormous demand for nurses, Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, a Bellmore, NY resident and dean of Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing since 1993, has been elected the 2008 chair of the Board of Commissioners of the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, the national nonprofit agency that exclusively accredits baccalaureate and higher degree programs in nursing.

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Contact:
Cara Halstead Cea, Public Information, Pace University
914-773-3312 (Office), 914-906-9680 (Cell) chalstead@pace.edu

Influential role for influential dean
DEAN OF PACE UNIVERSITY’S LIENHARD SCHOOL OF NURSING
NAMED CHAIR OF NATIONAL NURSING ACCREDITATION COMMISSION

Harriet R. Feldman also receives Grace E. Davidson award from NYU School of Nursing

NEW YORK, NY, November 29, 2007 – At a time of enormous demand for nurses, Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, a Bellmore, NY resident and dean of Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing since 1993, has been elected the 2008 chair of the Board of Commissioners of the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, the national nonprofit agency that exclusively accredits baccalaureate and higher degree programs in nursing.

She also was honored this month at her alma mater, New York University, with this year’s Grace E. Davidson award. The award recognizes outstanding contributions of nursing administrators to the education of nursing students.

“At a time when enormous demand for nurses could create temptations to cut corners on preparing the next generation of nurses, accreditation of nursing programs to serve the public interest is more vital than ever,” said Feldman. “I am pleased to be a member of this panel of individuals who broadly represent the interests of educators, deans, practitioners, employers, and community members.”

Bottlenecks and politics. Feldman is emerging as a national authority on three major trends that are changing the nursing profession – the shortage of nurses and nurse educators, the involvement of nurses in promoting health policy, and the promotion of evidence-based procedures in education and nursing practice.

Feldman has published more than 90 books, book chapters, refereed journal articles, and editorials that have focused on leadership, the nursing and faculty shortages, the role of nurses in the political arena, and evidence-based practice. She has especially spoken out on the nursing shortage and the bottleneck to educating more nurses that is being created by a parallel shortage of nursing faculty members.

Under her direction, the Lienhard School was a leader in a consortium of health-related institutions in New York’s Hudson Valley that in 2005 won a $1.03 million US Labor Department grant to help open that bottleneck. The funds provide monetary credits to healthcare facilities in exchange for loaning Master’s-prepared nurses to teach clinical courses, thereby making it possible to enroll greater numbers of nursing students

Partly as a result, the Lienhard School’s enrollment is up this fall by about 70 students, the fourth year with such an increase. Lienhard’s Family Nurse Practitioner Program is ranked ninth nationally in the U.S. News & World Report survey of “America’s Best Graduate Schools 2008.”
Building on this reputation, the Lienhard School received official word last week from New York State that its new Doctor of Nursing Practice program has been approved.

Feldman has testified in Congress and written numerous articles and letters to editors on nursing policy, becoming a nationally known figure both within her field and in the media. For her legislative work in addressing the shortage, she received the “STAR” award for grassroots political advocacy from the Association of American Colleges of Nursing.

Prized books. In the last six years, Feldman has edited four award-winning books. “Nurses in the Political Arena: The Public Face of Nursing” (2000), with Sandra Lewenson, EdD, RN, FAAN received an American Journal of Nursing (AJN) Book of the Year award and a Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Print Media Award. That was soon followed by “The Nursing Shortage: Strategies for Recruitment and Retention in Clinical Practice and Education” (2003), “Educating Nurses for Leadership” (2005, with Martha J. Greenberg, PhD, RN), and “Teaching Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing” (2006, with Rona F. Levin, PhD, RN), all three of which also received AJN Book of the Year awards.

Feldman is on US Representative Nita Lowey’s (D-NY) Health Advisory Committee and on the board of Nurses Educational Fund, Inc. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and a Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine, and past editor of the journals Nursing Leadership Forum and Scholarly Inquiry for Nursing Practice.

She received her BS and MS degrees in nursing from Adelphi University and her PhD in nursing science from New York University.

About Pace. For 101 years Pace University has combined exceptional academics with professional experiences and the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York enrolling more than 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

Pace Family Nurse Practitioner Program Joins Environmental Law in National Top Ten Rankings

Pace University’s graduate program that trains family nurse practitioners has moved into the top ten such programs nationally in the U.S. News & World Report survey of “America’s Best Graduate Schools 2008.”

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Contact:
Cara Halstead Cea, Pace University 914-773-3312,
cell 914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu

FAMILY NURSE PRACTITIONER PROGRAM AT PACE UNIVERSITY
MOVES INTO RANKS OF TOP TEN GRADUATE PROGRAMS

Joins Pace Law School environmental program in U.S. News top tier

Program typifies Lienhard School of Nursing initiatives
to reduce health-care personnel shortages

New York, NY- May 10, 2007 – Pace University’s graduate program that trains family nurse practitioners has moved into the top ten such programs nationally in the U.S. News & World Report survey of “America’s Best Graduate Schools 2008.”

The program ranks ninth nationally and has only two top-tier peers in the Northeast — Yale and Columbia.

The others at this level are at the University of Washington, the University of California at San Francisco. the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Colorado Health Science Center, the University of Maryland, the University of North Carolina, and Rush University.

“This is a very prestigious list,” said the dean of Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing, Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN. She noted that Pace competes with 285 family nurse practitioner graduate programs in the nation.

The family nurse practitioner program joins Pace’s environmental law program in the top-ten graduate rankings in their respective fields. The law program was ranked third in the nation for the fifth consecutive year, after only the programs at Vermont Law School and Lewis and Clark College at Northwestern.

Needs for workers. The Lienhard School and its administration have received considerable professional and media attention in recent years for addressing critical national and regional shortages of health practitioners. Family nurse practitioners play a critical role in dealing with those issues, since FNPs fulfill many of the needs a family doctor typically would, providing direct health care including prescribing medicine.

Pace’s FNP program was one of the first in New York State and has been preparing FNPs for over 30 years. Four faculty members are Fellows in the American Academy of Nursing, of which there are only 1,500 worldwide.

Likewise, Pace Law School was one of the first law schools in the country to develop a comprehensive environmental law curriculum. Today, the school offers over 25 environmental courses and houses an award-winning Environmental Litigation Clinic, an internationally respected Energy Project that focuses on developing sustainable energy programs, and a highly regarded Land Use Law Center. Recent innovations include comparative environmental law courses with Brazil and Singapore, a role as a founder of an international Academy of Environmental law, and joint degree programs with the Yale University School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and the Bard Center for Environmental Policy.

U.S. News & World Report determines the program rankings by tallying nominations given by peer schools. The complete U.S. News and World Report rankings and accompanying articles are available online at www.usnews.com or in print on newsstands. The rankings were released in April.

Outcome orientation. For more than 100 years Pace University has been preparing students to become leaders in their fields by providing an education combining exceptional academics with professional experience and the New York advantage. A private metropolitan university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York that enroll nearly 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.