Nursing Spectrum: 3 paths to a DNP

Three nursing professional were highlighted in a story in Nursing Spectrum about overcoming obstacles to earn a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree, including Pace adjunct professor Anny Eusebio.

Three nursing professionals were highlighted in a story in Nursing Spectrum about overcoming obstacles to earn a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree, including Pace adjunct professor Anny Eusebio.

From Nursing Spectrum:

Family nurse practitioner Anny Eusebio, RN, DNP, FNP-BC, at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital’s primary care outpatient clinic at the Columbia campus and an adjunct professor at Pace University in New York, began her nursing career with a bachelor’s degree from Columbia University in New York City. She first received a bachelor’s in psychology but returned for a nursing degree. Then she practiced at The Mount Sinai Medical Center in Manhattan before transitioning to a school-based clinic as a special education substitute nurse.

Working per diem as a school nurse provided her time to return to Columbia University for her master’s degree and a career as a nurse practitioner. She was not satisfied with stopping her education mid-level, so Eusebio began toying with the idea of returning for a DNP.

“I saw changes in the healthcare environment and felt motivated to do it and to go for it,” Eusebio said.

Wanting the flexibility of taking some Internet-based courses, so she could be home with her 3-year-old son sometimes, led her to Pace University. NewYork-Presbyterian allowed Eusebio to take Friday’s off for in-person classes and reimbursed her tuition for the three-year DNP program. Even with family and employer support, she found the conflicting obligations a challenge.

“It’s quite a lot of multitasking, and you have to have organizational skills and prioritize,” she said, adding that she reached out to student colleagues to help her stay focused. “You get through it, and after you do, it’s such an accomplishment, a great feeling.”

Eusebio was attracted to the research elements of a doctorate degree. “I wanted to show how we quantify what we do, how we prove what we are doing is right or that we are doing excellent work,” she said. “I don’t think that is well documented, and nursing is taken for granted. I wanted to be involved and learn how to improve the nursing profession.”

Eusebio has used her new DNP knowledge to co-lead a nurse practitioner forum and is planning to collect data to demonstrate that NewYork-Presbyterian’s nurse practitioner-led anticoagulation clinic decreases patient complications and hospitalization readmissions.

Although she acknowledges a DNP degree is not for everyone, she said for her it made sense.

“We need to be able to propel the profession, and [a doctoral degree] was the only way I saw that could happen,” Eusebio said. “I wanted to be part of that.”

Read the full article: 3 paths to a DNP | New York Nursing News.

Lienhard School Wins Nearly $1 Million to Enhance New Nursing Doctoral Program

At a time when the US population is increasingly diverse and quality patient outcomes and patient safety are hot topics in health care, Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing has won a three-year federal grant of nearly $1 million to enhance its new doctoral program in the areas of cultural competence and evidence-based practice.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Cara Halstead Cea, 914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu or Joanne K. Singleton, PhD, 212-346-1903, jsingleton@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF NURSING WINS FEDERAL GRANT OF NEARLY $1 MILLION TO ENHANCE TRAINING IN MULTICULTURAL ISSUES, PRACTICES BASED ON RESEARCH $900,439 grant from U.S.

Department of Health and Human Services will deepen new doctoral program’s emphasis on primary care for underserved populations

NEW YORK, NY – At a time when the US population is increasingly diverse and quality patient outcomes and patient safety are hot topics in health care, Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing has won a three-year federal grant of nearly $1 million to enhance its new doctoral program in the areas of cultural competence and evidence-based practice.

According to Lienhard Dean Harriet R. Feldman, the changes will help keep Lienhard “a step ahead of the rest” in the burgeoning national effort to make sure students are prepared to address the needs of diverse populations using the best available evidence. The award comes from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services under its Advanced Education Nursing Grant program. The grant will help provide curriculum enhancements for the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program that Lienhard announced this spring.

The enhancements will focus on increasing student and faculty expertise in the areas of cultural competence and evidence-based practice improvement. The DNP program is intended to educate students’ to reach the highest level of clinical practice in nursing. Currently, all enrolled students are Family Nurse Practitioners (FNPs). The first class of 24 enters this fall. Lienhard’s FNP program is ranked ninth in the nation by US News & World Report.

Both DNP faculty members and students will get additional training in cultural awareness and sensitivity, producing what has come to be known as “cultural competence.”

Instruction will expand in delivering primary care that draws on scientific evidence, one aspect of “evidence-based practice,” or EBP.

The training will focus especially on vulnerable groups. Feldman co-edited a recent book on the subject with Lienhard graduate chair, Rona F. Levin, “EBP is based on the idea that nurses can contribute to the development of a scientific base for nursing practice by critiquing and questioning standard guidelines, treatments and outcomes. It empowers nurses on the front lines to fix problems.”

Team leaders. National healthcare accrediting bodies including The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and The Joint Commission are urging healthcare organizations to assess their capacity to meet patients’ cultural needs not only with training, but with such care components as language services, religious and spiritual care, and special diets.

“This focus of this grant will help distinguish our Doctor of Nursing Practice program from the others. And the skills of cultural competence and evidence-based practice are what employers tell us they are looking for,” said Feldman.

Added Joanne K. Singleton, Ph.D., the Director of the FNP-DNP program and the Project Director for the grant, “Our students will be challenged to learn how to design, deliver and lead interdisciplinary primary health care teams in developing and implementing culturally-competent best practices. We expect our graduates to make significant contributions to the overall health of our nation, which will include addressing national health disparities.”

About the Lienhard School of Nursing: With classrooms and laboratories in culturally diverse urban and suburban settings, Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing is committed to innovation and excellence in education, research, and practice in primary health care. It has nearly doubled in size over the last five years, and now has more than 700 students enrolled in baccalaureate and master’s degree programs, all approved by the New York State Education Department and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. Lienhard partners with communities to foster human growth and dignity and provide primary care, and is devoted to preparing individuals, families, and communities at local, national, and international levels to meet health care demands now and in the future. Professional education at Pace University: Since 1906 Pace University has offered professional education that combines liberal arts with practical experience and the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York. It enrolls more than 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

New Doctor of Nursing Practice Degree Puts Pace University on Forefront of National Movement

Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing recently became one of only three institutions approved by New York State to offer a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree. The others are Columbia University and the University of Rochester.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Cara Halstead Cea, Pace University
914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu

NEW DOCTOR OF NURSING PRACTICE DEGREE PUTS PACE UNIVERSITY ON FOREFRONT OF NEW NATIONAL MOVEMENT IN NURSING EDUCATION

Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing becomes one of only three colleges in NY State to offer the degree

Level of preparation for advanced nursing practice roles is transitioning from masters to doctorate by 2015

NEW YORK, NY – Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing recently became one of only three institutions approved by New York State to offer a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree. The others are Columbia University and the University of Rochester.

The new DNP program will prepare nurses for the highest level of nursing practice. The degree is designed for those in advanced levels of direct clinical practice and in areas that support clinical practice administration, organizational management and leadership, and policy development.

Recruitment for the fall DNP program has begun. The school is accepting inquiries and applications at nursing@pace.edu, or (914) 773-3552.

A trend to change. Across the nation, nursing is moving in the direction of other health professions in the transition to the DNP. In October 2004, the members of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), the major voice of baccalaureate and higher degree nursing education programs, called for moving the level of preparation necessary for advanced nursing practice (ANP) roles from the master’s degree to the doctorate level by 2015. The AACN now recommends DNP programs for educating APNs and other nurses seeking top clinical positions. In 2005, the National Academy of Sciences also called for nursing to develop a non-research, clinical doctorate to prepare expert practitioners who can also serve as clinical faculty members, a need that the new DNP addresses.

DNP graduates will likely fill practice-leadership roles in a variety of settings, becoming managers of quality initiatives, executives in healthcare organizations, directors of clinical programs, and faculty members responsible for clinical program delivery and clinical teaching.

Research has established a clear link between higher levels of nursing education and better patient outcomes. According to the AACN, changing demands in health care require that nurses serving in specialty positions have the highest possible levels of scientific knowledge and practice expertise. These changes include: increased use of evidence-based practice, increasing complexity of patient care, rising national concerns about quality of care and patient safety, the national nursing shortage and shortages of doctorally prepared nursing faculty members to teach new nurses, and increasing educational expectations for the preparation of other health professionals.

Impact on nursing education and practice. Currently, advanced practice nurses, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, nurse midwives, and nurse anesthetists, are typically prepared in master’s degree programs, some of which carry a credit load equivalent to doctoral degrees in the other health professions. DNP curricula build on current master’s programs by providing education in areas including evidence-based practice, quality improvement, and systems thinking.

The DNP focuses especially on providing leadership for evidence-based practice. This requires competence in translating research into practice, evaluating evidence, applying research in decision-making, and implementing viable clinical innovations to change practices. DNP-prepared nurses will work alongside nurse researchers prepared in PhD, DNSc and other research-focused nursing doctorates to advance the science and practice of nursing.
About the Lienhard School of Nursing: With classrooms and laboratories in culturally diverse urban and suburban settings, Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing (LSN) is committed to innovation and excellence in education, research, and practice in primary health care. With more than 600 students enrolled in baccalaureate and master’s degree programs, all approved by the New York State Education Department and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, LSN partners with communities to foster human growth and dignity and provide primary care. The School is devoted to preparing individuals, families, and communities at local, national, and international levels to meet health care demands now and in the future.

About Pace University: For 101 years Pace University has combined exceptional academics with professional experiences and the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu