Pace Chemistry Professor Receives Distinguished Scientist Award

David N. Rahni, professor of analytical chemistry and director of the graduate program in environmental science at Pace University, has been selected to receive the 1996 Distinguished Scientist Award of the Westchester Chemical Society.

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PLEASANTVILLE, NY — David N. Rahni, professor of analytical chemistry and director of the graduate program in environmental science at Pace University, has been selected to receive the 1996 Distinguished Scientist Award of the Westchester Chemical Society.

The Westchester Chemical Society represents more than 850 chemists and is the charter section of the American Chemical Society.

Dr. Rahni was chosen for the award in recognition of his scholarly contributions to the fields of immobilized enzyme electroanalytical biosensors, nano-engineering, clinical and environmental science, and his promotion of sustainable development.

Dr. Rahni also holds adjunct professorships in the department of dermatology at the New York Medical College and in the LL.M. environmental law program at Pace University School of Law.

The American Chemical Society has named Dr. Rahni as general chair for its 31st Middle Atlantic Regional Meeting, to be held on the University’s Pleasantville campus in May. The event is expected to draw as many as 1,500 scientists for a series of presentations, exhibits and symposia.

In 1993-94, he was a Fulbright Senior Research Scholar at the Technical University of Denmark and a visiting professor at the University of Oxford in England. Dr. Rahni was awarded a visiting professorship to Denmark by the Royal Danish Research Academy in the summer of 1994. He has held visiting scientific positions with IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center and Ciba Additives Research Division and has lectured at the Universities of Rome, Florence and Mexico. He has also been a visiting United Nations Scholar in the Third World, presenting lectures and assisting in curriculum development.

He completed his B.Sc. in chemistry at the National University of Iran, his M.S. in chemistry at Eastern New Mexico University, and his Ph.D. in analytical chemistry at the University of New Orleans in 1985.

Dr. Rahni and his wife, Fay, live in Ossining, NY. They have three children.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law and Lienhard School of Nursing.

Pace Law School Hosts National Environmental Moot Court Competition

Pace University School of Law’s Ninth Annual National Environmental Law Moot Court Competition, the largest environmental moot in the country, will be held from Thursday, February 20 to Saturday, February 22 at the School’s White Plains campus, 78 North Broadway.

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(212) 346-1268
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. — Pace University School of Law’s Ninth Annual National Environmental Law Moot Court Competition, the largest environmental moot in the country, will be held from Thursday, February 20 to Saturday, February 22 at the School’s White Plains campus, 78 North Broadway.

Each two- or three-person team from more than 80 law schools nationwide, has written and filed a brief on retroactivity and commerce clause issues in a CERCLA liability proceeding. During the competition, each team will defend its position before a panel of judges comprised of attorneys and federal and state judges, most of whom are specialists in the field of environmental law.

The judges presiding over the final round include: Environmental Appeals Judge Honorable Edward E. Reich, who works with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Environmental Appeals Board; Honorable Eugene E. Siler Jr., a United States Court of Appeals Judge for the Sixth Circuit in Cincinnati, Ohio; Honorable Jane R. Roth, a United States Court of Appeals Judge for the Third Circuit in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and Honorable Richard D. Cudahy, a United States Court of Appeals Judge for the Seventh Circuit in Chicago, Illinois.

Preliminary rounds are held on Thursday with the top-scoring 27 teams advancing to the quarter-final round. Nine teams will advance to the final round, which will be held on Saturday, February 22, and is free and open to the public.

Awards are given in the following categories: Winning Team; Best Oralist; Best Brief; Finalist Team; and Best Brief Representing Each Party. The team with the highest combined scores for both the oral argument and written brief will win the competition. The winning team receives a traveling trophy of an original watercolor, “Dawn-Storm King,” by Hudson Valley artist John Husley, which commemorates the 1965 court decision inaugurating the field of environmental law. Last year’s winning team was from The University of Houston.

This student-run competition is sponsored annually by the Pace Law School’s Environmental Moot Court Board in collaboration with the Environmental Law Institute in Washington, D.C., and Texaco Inc. In the past, law students have argued on environmental topics ranging from illegal dumping to personal liability for violation by a corporation. Winning briefs will be published in the Pace Environmental Law Review.

The School of Law is part of a comprehensive diversified University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Its Environmental Law program has consistently been rated among the top programs in the country.

Students View Multimedia Presentations as an Effective Teaching Tool

Teachers who are looking for new, effective ways to reach students should consider going high-tech in the classroom. It seems the “MTV generation” prefers multimedia presentations over traditional chalkboard instructions, a new Pace University survey shows.

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NEW YORK — Teachers who are looking for new, effective ways to reach students should consider going high-tech in the classroom. It seems the “MTV generation” prefers multimedia presentations over traditional chalkboard instructions, a new Pace University survey shows.

Nearly 82 percent of the students surveyed felt that multimedia presentations increased their interest in the material and improved student-teacher interaction, said Psychology Professor Richard Velayo, who conducted the survey. Nearly 64 percent of the students felt that the multimedia format increased their understanding of the subject and helped them organize and take notes.

“Using multimedia presentations is an attempt to engage the students,” said Dr. Velayo, who incorporates computer-generated demonstrations with his lectures and class discussions. Dr. Velayo added that it is important to get students to actively interact with the material presented so they have a sense of control over their learning. He uses a laptop computer, CD-ROM, large-screen televisions, sound, pictures and, occasionally, films and videos to enhance his lectures.

Dr. Velayo surveyed 83 undergraduate and graduate students in his psychology courses on the use of multimedia technology in the classroom. A majority of the students say the computerized presentations enhance the lectures, but a few say it is more difficult to take notes and understand the material.

“Most students like this technology given its novelty,” Dr. Velayo said. “But if they perceive the material to be more interesting as well as promoting increased interaction, it will have a positive affect on their learning.” However, Dr. Velayo warned, this medium can be detrimental if students become passive observers in the process, as if watching television. The educational and social implications of this study’s findings certainly must be explored further, Dr. Velayo said.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law and Lienhard School of Nursing.