Investor’s Business Daily: “Plan To Refresh Resolutions”

Your New Year’s resolution seemed solid. Now it’s February and you’ve lost your motivation. Refresh.

By now, many of us have abandoned, or at least downgraded, our expectations for what we will do to change our lives in 2012.

Amy Alexander,  writing for Investor’s Business Daily, sought tips from goal-setting experts such as Pace’s Dr. Richard Shadick on how to reframe, or possibly even leverage, the slump that can happen in February when it comes to New Year’s resolutions.

Get smart. “Most resolutions go awry because people do not think through what it takes to reach a goal,” said psychologist Richard Shadick, director of Pace University’s Counseling Center in New York City. “Instead of telling yourself ‘I am going to lose weight and be healthy next year,’ it is better to say ‘I will lose 5 pounds by March 15th by walking for 20 minutes three days a week and no longer drinking soda.'”

Get additional insight on how you can get back on track by clicking here to read the entire article.

SpryLiving: “A New You for the New Year”

It’s January. Time to ring in the New Year. And you have, without a doubt, made a ton of resolutions that for once you vow to finally keep. Know that you have the power to thrive, succeed, and become the individual you desire in 2012—without ever having to totally give up Moon Pies. Pace’s Richard Shadick and John Cronin offer advice in Spry Living’s January issue, reaching 9.5 million readers, on how to make your New Year Better Than Before.

“Yes, we all want to lose weight, eat more vegetables, get fit, drink water instead of white wine, hold fewer grudges, manage our stress, sleep better and help the planet go greener,” writes Jane Wilkens Michael in the January issue of Spry Living

But alas for many of us, our best goals and intentions are forgotten faster than old acquaintenances.  Here are tips that Michael garnered from Pace faculty members John Cronin and Richard Shadick on how to make our resolutions live on after January 1:

Emotional Health

Be realistic—and specific. “Instead of telling yourself, I am going to lose weight and be healthy next year, it is better to say, I will lose five pounds by February 15 by walking for 20 minutes three days a week and no longer drinking soda,” says Dr. Richard Shadick, director of the Counseling Center and adjunct associate professor of psychology at Pace University. The more specific, measurable, and attainable a goal is, the more likely it can be reached.

Giving back

It’s easy being green. “This New Year, resolve to help the planet,” says John Cronin, senior fellow for Environmental Affairs at Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies. “There are two questions I am asked most often: ‘Can one person really make a difference?’ and ‘How?’ The answer to the first is easy: Yes! It is the story of human history — but those who never try to make a difference never do.” Cronin poses a creative challenge: “Look to your own life to find that something special you can make happen. For example, one mechanic adds a dollar to the bill of each of his car repair customers as a donation to the Riverkeeper organization. Over the past 20 years he has directed thousands of dollars to the group, and his customers are delighted. Help your child’s school find environmental experts to speak to classes. Here’s a simple one: Share a fascinating fact, and your friends will spread the information too —how much of the water on our planet is available for drinking? (Answer: Less than 1%). I promise they will be amazed, educated and eager to tell someone else. The point is that in addition to the how-to’s of proper individual behavior, which after 42 Earth Days should be common knowledge by now, there are creative acts you can perform, invent and organize that will change the world right in your own backyard if you are bold enough to try.  Jump right in. The planet is waiting.”

Prevention Magazine: “8 Ways to Beat the Holiday Blues”

It’s hard to tell when all the joyous merriment of the season tips over into a seemingly undue case of the blues. From social, work and family celebrations, to financial pressure of gift-buying, to the hurry-up-and-party mentality, to skipped workouts, erratic eating and overblown New Year’s Resolutions … the fact is, holiday blues are nearly inevitable. Here’s a spoonful of coping advice from Pace’s Dr. Richard Shadick.

“Remember, holidays are often stressful. Holidays require more of us–more socializing, more shopping, and more running around,” says Richard Shadick, PhD, Director of the Counseling Center and Associate Adjunct Professor of Psychology at Pace University, in an article appearing in Prevention magazine and online at MSN Health.  “All of this can be taxing, so adjust your expectations and you won’t be as disappointed if the holidays don’t feel like great fun.”

Don’t go for broke

“Financial pressures are common during the holidays, particularly given the state of the economy in the past few years,” says Shadick. “Don’t assume that you are required to give lavishly if you cannot afford to. Complete a budget and stick to it.” Find thoughtful ways to reach out to people—whether it’s offering to pick up items for a neighbor when you’re hitting the grocery for the sixth time in a week, or just texting a friend who’s entertaining a houseful to see how she’s doing.

Dyson College Psychology Professor Offers 3 New Year’s Resolutions for the Office

New Year’s resolutions can be difficult to keep, but here are three to strive for that will make a difference around the office in 1999: · Think and talk positively in the new year “Nothing damages morale of management and workers as readily as negativity,” says Richard Wessler, a psychology professor at Pace University in Pleasantville, N.Y.

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Here are 3 managerial “musts,” says Pace University professor

NEW YORK – New Year’s resolutions can be difficult to keep, but here are three
to strive for that will make a difference around the office in 1999:

· Think and talk positively in the new year
“Nothing damages morale of management and workers as readily as negativity,” says
Richard Wessler, a psychology professor at Pace University in Pleasantville, N.Y.
“A positive outlook influences everyone to think and feel that way too.” Many people
do not realize that optimism is a choice Wessler says. Tackle tough tasks and office
problems after a positive outlook is in place.

· Resolve to work toward harmony in the workplace
“Make sure that everyone gets fair and equal treatment. Employees who feel short-changed
often unconsciously try to even the score,” Wessler says. Your job as boss is to make people
feel wanted, appreciated and productive.

· Try something new
“Remind yourself that this is a new year and a good time for a fresh start. Changes do not
have to be big in order to be psychologically refreshing,” Wessler says. Something as small
as turning your desk in a new direction or changing the pictures on the wall will do. Break
out of familiar patterns, try changing your lunch hour or wearing something new.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester
County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in
the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and
Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the
World Trade Institute.