The New York Times: Schimmel Center to Host Shakespeare’s Globe’s ‘Hamlet’

Pace’s Schimmel Center will host Shakespeare’s Globe’s “Hamlet” October 2-7.

Jennifer Schuessler, writing for the Arts Beat blog of The New York Times, reported that Pace University’s Schimmel Center will host Shakespeare’s Globe’s “Hamlet” October 2-7.

From New York Times:

“A staging of “Hamlet” by Shakespeare’s Globe theater will be among the attractions in the 2012-13 season at Pace University’s Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, which announced its line-up on Tuesday. “Hamlet,” which is directed by Dominic Dromgoole and will run Oct. 2-7, will be the Shakespeare’s Globe’s third appearance at the center in lower Manhattan, following “Love’s Labour’s Lost” in 2009 and “The Merry Wives of Windsor”in 2010.

The more than 30-event season, which begins on Sept. 22, will also include an appearance by the Romanian gypsy brass band Fanfare Ciocarlia; a banjo summit featuring Béla Fleck; and a tribute to Woody Guthrie by Justin Townes Earle and guests.”

NEW YORK TIMES: Theater Review | ‘The Merchant of Venice’

At a time when “anti-Semitism… has blighted if not ended two major careers” in fashion and show business,” the “terrific” production of Shakespeares “The Merchant of Venice” now at Pace is “oddly fitting,” according to The New York Times’s rave review. http://theater.nytimes.com/2011/03/05/theater/reviews/05merchant.html?ref=arts

Evoking the “bottom-line obsessed world of today’s Wall Street,” F. Murray Abraham’s Shylock has “a fierce hatred in his heart, but on the surface struggles to maintain a steady cool,” says the reviewer, Charles Isherwood. Abraham”s performance in many ways exceeds even that of Al Pacino, Isherwood says.

What Price a Pound of Flesh?

By CHARLES ISHERWOOD

If you’ve scanned the headlines recently, you have no doubt been freshly reminded that the toxin of anti-Semitism has hardly been eradicated from contemporary culture. In the last couple of weeks it has surfaced spectacularly in the worlds of show business and fashion, blighting, if not ending, two major careers.

How oddly fitting, in these strange circumstances, that New York should play host to a terrific production of “The Merchant of Venice,” arriving just weeks after the last one closed. The new staging, from Theater for a New Audience, features F. Murray Abraham as Shylock. (I don’t need to remind you of who starred in the just-closed Broadway version, do I?) The production, directed by Darko Tresnjak and originally produced in 2007, can be seen at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts at Pace University through March 13 before a tour to Chicago, Boston and Los Angeles.

Modern dress is often the default choice of directors trying to signpost Shakespeare’s relevance today, but Mr. Tresnjak’s version, evoking the bottom-line-obsessed world of today’s Wall Street, resonates more deeply than most in suggesting how the calculations of profit and loss are integral to even the most intimate human relationships. With the businessmen of Venice attired in sleek dark suits and sporting the latest in high-tech gadgetry, Mr. Tresnjak’s nuanced interpretation also points toward the casual, collective prejudice — whether it is anti-Semitism, misogyny or homophobia — that still germinates among all-male societies today.

Most impressive, however, are the fully realized performances in literally all of the play’s roles. Mr. Tresnjak and his superb cast allow us to see with unusual clarity the light and the dark in Shakespeare’s characters, not just the wronged but vengeful Shylock and his nemesis, the casually bigoted Antonio (Tom Nelis), but also the wise, loving Portia (Kate MacCluggage), who sees fit to test her husband’s love with unnecessary calculation, and comparatively insignificant players like the servant Launcelot Gobbo (a spirited, funny Jacob Ming-Trent).

Shakespeare’s profound understanding of human complexity is rendered with such care that we register sharply how both cruelty and compassion, ignorance and intelligence, mercy and injustice reside not just in any human heart, but also in every human heart. A late-coming speech we often only half-hear, a celebration of the music of the spheres from the minor character Lorenzo (Vince Nappo), makes a powerful impression, encapsulating the lamentable truth the production illuminates.

Gazing up at the stars, he muses, “Such harmony is in immortal souls,/But whilst this muddy vesture of decay/Doth grossly enclose it, we cannot hear it.” Disharmony is the condition of fallen humanity, and even the noblest and most loving hearts are deeply flawed.

Mr. Abraham’s Shylock is probably the finest I’ve seen, although the British actor Henry Goodman was terrific in a National Theater production in London some years ago. It would be coy to avoid any comparisons with Al Pacino’s exciting, savage-spirited performance for the Public Theater production in Central Park and, later, Broadway. Both Mr. Abraham and Mr. Pacino are first-rate actors, I need hardly say, but Mr. Abraham is the more rigorous classicist, phrasing the language with an attentive care for rhythm and clarity.

Mr. Pacino brought intense fire and a revelatory anger to Shylock’s most famous speech (“If you prick us, do we not bleed?”). Mr. Abraham delivers it with a complicated mixture of bitterness and implacable logic. As a man who must negotiate the decorous halls of the contemporary business world, Mr. Abraham’s Shylock keeps a tighter lid on his rage, and on his humiliation, too. In flashing asides we see how the treatment he has received has stoked a fierce hatred in his heart, but on the surface he struggles to maintain a steady cool, even when he is being taunted and beaten.

Mr. Abraham’s Shylock is also piercingly moving when he gives way to a desperate grief at the loss of his daughter (and, yes, the ducats on which his pride as a successful businessman in an antipathetic world rests). Speaking to Tubal of the ring he cherished as a remembrance of his wife, he breaks down in tears, and Mr. Abraham makes us feel acutely how his suffering and his thirst for revenge are tragically, inextricably linked.

As Portia, Ms. MacCluggage radiates a forthright intelligence inflected with both humor and, when she has declared her love for Bassanio (Lucas Hall), a glowing warmth. Mr. Hall’s Bassanio is touching in the sincerity and simplicity of his ardor, and in his deep filial feeling for Antonio, as well. (I think the impulsive kiss in the trial scene is a mistake, however; hints of homosexuality don’t violate the word of the text, but is such literalism necessary?)

Mr. Nelis’s Antonio bears himself with an upright stoicism, and his affection for Bassanio is written in gentle but true colors. We see, too, the reflexive prejudice that has him unthinkingly take out his handkerchief to wipe his hand after shaking Shylock’s. And yet it is of course Antonio, rather more than the unflinching Portia (in disguise), who grants Shylock at least a little of the mercy she so eloquently invokes in the trial scene.

The smaller roles are filled equally well: Ted Schneider is a frat-boyishly funny Gratiano, Christen Simon Marabate a poised Nerissa. Melissa Miller and Mr. Nappo are unusually vivid as Shylock’s daughter, Jessica, and her beloved Lorenzo, their uneasy relations clearly haunted by the shadow of the prevalent prejudice against Jews and by her guilt at having abandoned her father.

Love in Shakespeare’s plays is rarely a simple matter, but it is almost always presented as an example of humanity’s noblest impulses, the best of what man can become. Blissful unions conclude most of the great comedies.

“The Merchant of Venice,” which is technically classified as a comedy, is no exception. But in this troubling play the love matches bring grief in their wake, just as the pursuit of justice — ostensibly a righteous mission — also proves an act of inhuman cruelty. Without piling on the atmospheric gloom, as Daniel Sullivan’s Broadway production sometimes did, Mr. Tresnjak’s first-rate interpretation makes these complications get under your skin in a way they rarely do. You are left with the disheartening thought that it is possible to do right and wrong at the same time.

Read the article with photos on the New York Times web site here.

NY Daily News: Author Edwidge Danticat leads Haiti benefit

From the NY Daily News: “Enjoy a special event for a special cause – ‘An Evening with Edwidge Danticat: Haiti on My Mind – a Fundraiser’ from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. next Thursday at Pace University’s Schimmel Auditorium, 1 Pace Plaza.”

From the NY Daily News: “Enjoy a special event for a special cause – ‘An Evening with Edwidge Danticat: Haiti on My Mind – a Fundraiser’ from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. next Thursday at Pace University’s Schimmel Auditorium, 1 Pace Plaza.”

http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/brooklyn/2010/09/26/2010-09-26_love_at_first_page_in_relationship_book.html

Confucius Institute at Pace Hosts “Chinese Bridge” – Chinese Culture & Language Competition

On Saturday, April 17, from 10 AM to 5 PM in the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts at Pace University’s downtown Manhattan campus, approximately 25 non-Chinese contestants will try to impress Chinese judges with their knowledge of the world’s most-spoken language and the culture behind it.

Media Contact:

Samuella Becker, Pace Public Information, 212-346-1637, cell 917-734-5172, sbecker2@pace.edu

New Chinese proverb: The longest journey begins with a single contest

Pace University hosts April 17 regional finals of competition in knowledge of Chinese language and culture for prizes of trips to Beijing

Pace further expands China-related activities with essay competition created by New York Chinese Opera Society, participation in 8th conference on teaching of Chinese

NEW YORK, NY, April 12, 2010 – The event mixes American Idol and the Putnam County Spelling Bee, with trips to China as the prizes.

It also is a microcosm of current efforts by China to encourage foreigners to know it better at the levels that undergird commerce and diplomacy.

On Saturday, April 17, from 10 AM to 5 PM in the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts at Pace University’s downtown Manhattan campus, approximately 25 non-Chinese contestants will try to impress Chinese judges with their knowledge of the world’s most-spoken language and the culture behind it.

They will give speeches in Chinese, perform Chinese songs or dances, demonstrate other Chinese arts like paper cuts and calligraphy (including martial arts), or answer questions about past and present-day China.

The winners will get a chance to compete against contestants from around the world in a final round this summer in Beijing, all expenses paid, plus offers of scholarships to study in China for one semester.

The event is free and open to the public. The auditorium is located at 3 Spruce Street, just east of City Hall.

Media admission by press passes. Please notify us if you will cover this event or would like to interview some of the organizers and contestants by phone.

The competition is the 9th annual “Chinese Bridge,” officially known as the Greater New York Chinese Proficiency Competition for Foreign College Students. It is hosted by the year-old Confucius Institute at Pace University and sponsored by Hanban, the nonprofit organization organized by the Chinese government to spread knowledge of Chinese language and culture around the world.

Competitors next Saturday will have risen to the top of an original field of 85 contestants who were winnowed in preliminary rounds held April 3 at New York University and Ohio State. The initial entrants came from 13 countries including the western nations of the US, England, Germany and Spain as well as Korea and Japan. They are studying at 32 universities ranging from Eastern Ivies like Penn and Princeton to the University of Akron and SUNY Binghamton.

Roughly a third of the regional finalists will be chosen for the final round.

The competition will be broadcast by Chinese TV channels in China and to all of the worldwide Confucius Institutes. It will covered by the main Chinese government media agencies in the US, in both English and Chinese. The event is a pilot test of a competition that Hanban hopes will become nationwide next year.

Opened last May, the Confucius Institute at Pace University is the first university-based Confucius Institute in New York City and one of 60 in the US and nearly 300 around the world created by China to spread knowledge of Chinese language and culture.

Essay contest, teaching conference

A week after the Bridge competition, on April 23, the Pace Confucius Institute will join with the New York Chinese Opera Society in a reception to celebrate establishment of an endowed fund of $25,000 that the Society has created to sponsor an annual essay competition at Pace “on the study of Chinese culture and history.”

The NYCOS has performed frequently at Pace’s Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, most recently staging a performance of the opera “The Story of Ruth.”

In a third sign of Pace University’s increasing links to China, on May 15, the Confucius Institute at Pace University will host the8th annual conference of the Chinese Language Teachers Association of Greater New York, in which more than 200 teachers and scholars are expected to participate. Attendees from secondary schools, colleges and universities will be offered nearly 60 presentations on everything from Chinese naming conventions to motivating online learners and “digital Chinese storytelling.”

More information on the conference is at http://clta-gny.org/10conf/10conf_invite.html.

About the Pace Confucius Institute

The competitions are among the first events arranged by the Confucius Institute at Pace. It expects to inaugurate Chinese language classes for both students and professional groups; encourage interdisciplinary scholarship on China through collaborate research, conferences and public lectures; develop innovative teaching and learning techniques and institutional exchanges, integrate study of China into Pace University’s liberal arts and professional curricula, and sponsor seminars for professionals in business, education, film and theater.

Its budget is contributed in equal shares by Pace, Hanban, and the Phoenix Publishing and Media Group, one of China’s largest media conglomerates. PPMG has sent executives to Pace’s graduate publishing program since 2007.

About Pace University

For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter | Flickr | YouTube. Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

“Fair & Balanced Comedy Show,” Yes Men, Join Left Forum at Pace March 20

“TELL YOUR FRIENDS! The Fair & Balanced Comedy Show” becomes part of 2010 Left Forum conference March 20 at Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts at Pace University

“TELL YOUR FRIENDS! The Fair & Balanced Comedy Show” becomes part of 2010 Left Forum conference March 20 at Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts at Pace University

The Yes Men included in bill

Location: 1 Pace Plaza (Spruce St. Entrance), New York, NY

Event Date: Mar 20, 2010; 8:00 PM

Event Page: http://tinyurl.com/TYFLeftForum

Doors open at 7PM; Show starts at 8PM

Admission:

Left Forum Attendees $5

Tickets for the Public $15

NOTE: Only 200 tickets will be sold to the public

Advance public tickets sold at http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/102068

HOST: Liam McEneaney

as seen on Comedy Central, VH1 and numerous tours in Europe WITH:

The Yes Men, a group of culture jamming activists who practice what they call “identity correction” by pretending to be powerful people and spokespersons for prominent organizations.

Lizz Winstead, an American comedian, radio and television personality, blogger and co-creator of Comedy Central’s “The Daily Show”

Baratunde Thurston, a comedian, host of Discovery’s “The Future Of…” and editor for The Onion: America’s Finest News Source

John Fugelsang, the son of an ex nun and Franciscan brother, a former VH1 VJ and host of “America’s Funniest Home Videos,” has had over 20 appearances on Bill Maher’s “Politically Incorrect” and won countless of comedy awards for his stand up and one-man show, “All the Wrong Reasons”

Victor Varnado has appeared on “Late Night w/ Conan O’Brien,” “Jimmy Kimmel Live!,” “Premium Blend,” “My Name is Earl,” in the movies “End of Days,” “Pluto Nash,” and “Julien Donkey Boy,” and his standup special/documentary “The Awkward Kings”

Others TBA

PLUS:

Videos from The Onion News Network

Videos from BarelyPolitical.com

And other videos TBA

TELL YOUR FRIENDS! is a Monday night work-out comedy room at Lolita Bar in the Lower East Side. It’s brought to you by Liam McEneaney from Vh1’s “Best Week Ever” and Comedy Central’s “Premium Blend.” Each Monday, TYF! brings together some of the best performers in the comedy scene with great musical guests. Past guests include Lewis Black, Janeane Garofalo, Jim Gaffigan, Greg Giraldo, Demetri Martin, John Oliver, Kristen Schaal, writers and performers from The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, The Colbert Report, Saturday Night Live, The Tonight Show, Late Night, The Onion, FunnyOrDie,com, and much more.

TELL YOUR FRIENDS! The Fair & Balanced Comedy Show will be the third major event at this year’s Left Forum conference at Pace University, following an opening plenary by The Reverend Jesse Jackson (March 19th) and preceding a Noam Chomsky event (March 21st). The Left Forum brings together organizers and intellectuals from across the globe to share ideas for understanding and transforming the world and provide a context for the critical dialogue that is essential for a stronger Left and more just society.

Produced by Liam McEneaney and Jessica Flores

More information about the show may be found at http://tinyurl.com/TYFcomedyNYC.

More information about The Left Forum may be found at http://leftforum.org/

More information about Pace University is at www.pace.edu

Contacts:

Jessica Flores tellyourfriendsbooking@gmail.com

347-245-6988

http://web.me.com/jessicayflores

Chris Cory, Pace University Public Information, 212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

Urban School Reform to be Theme of Eighth Annual Educators’ Lecture Series at Pace

Some of the nation’s most challenging advocates of urban school reform will present at Pace University’s School of Education’s 8th annual distinguished educators’ lecture series “Beyond Closing the Achievement Gap: The Next Level of Urban School Reform.”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Cara Cea, Pace University, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

Arthur Maloney, EdD, Pace School of Education, 212-346-1347, amaloney@pace.edu

Note: Photos are available of most participants on request

TOUGH ISSUES IN URBAN SCHOOLS TO BE DISCUSSED BY NATIONAL REFORMERS IN 2010 EDITION OF POPULAR AFTER-SCHOOL LECTURE SERIES AT PACE

Bill Ayers, University of Illinois distinguished professor who became issue in Obama campaign, to give final talk.

“Beyond Closing the Achievement Gap: The Next Level of Urban School Reform” to be theme of well-attended public sessions held after school near City Hall.

NEW YORK, NY – Some of the nation’s most challenging advocates of urban school reform will present at Pace University’s School of Education’s 8th annual distinguished educators’ lecture series “Beyond Closing the Achievement Gap: The Next Level of Urban School Reform.”

The schedule is as follows:

March 10 – Theresa Perry, a national expert in social identities and African American achievement;

March 17 – George Wood, instrumental in the opening of 80 new small high schools in urban Ohio;

March 24 – Tony Wagner, Tony Wagner, Harvard educator who discusses a global achievement gap between teaching and job needs;

April 21 – Bill Ayers, a proponent for teaching for social justice.

Ayers, whose name became national news because of his work with Barak Obama on educational issues in Chicago, was a co-founder of the Weather Underground during the Vietnam war era.

Full houses

The lectures are presented from 6-8 pm after the school day to accommodate educators; the series regularly fills Pace’s Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts in downtown Manhattan. The center is east of City Hall, entrance on Spruce Street between Gold and Park Row. The lectures are free and open to the public. Media admission by press pass.

Due to the series’ popularity, those outside the city can view the sessions through streaming live video at the Dutchess County Board of Cooperative Educational Services at 5 BOCES Road in Poughkeepsie, 845-486-4800.

Over the years the series has drawn virtually every eminent U.S. voice for improvement in elementary and secondary schools.

More information on the series is available at http://www.pace.edu/page.cfm?doc_id=8403 or from professor Arthur Maloney at (212) 346-1512 or amaloney@pace.edu.

The complete lineup of topics:

March 10

Theresa Perry, Ph.D.

Simmons College

“Towards a New Conversation about the Achievement and Development of African American Youth”

At the heart of Perry’s theory is the centuries-old belief among African Americans that education means liberation. She will argue that misunderstanding, misuse of resources, and misplaced sentiments are challenges in African American achievement. Perry is a Professor of Africana Studies and Education at Simmons College and director of The Race, Education and Democracy Lecture and Book Series, a collaborative effort of Simmons College and Beacon Press. Perry received her master’s degree in theology from Marquette and her doctorate in education from Harvard University.

March 17

George Wood, Ph.D.

Forum for Education and Democracy

“From a Culture of Testing to a Community of Learning”

Wood is Executive Director of The Forum for Education and Democracy and principal of Federal Hocking High School in Stewart, Ohio. Wood writes an education blog for the Forum at http://forumforeducation.org/blogs/george-wood. Referring to the “5,000 hours” that students spend in high school, he says on the blog that “America has an obligation to every child that this time is challenging, engaging, and enriching” and that the “most fundamental purpose of public education is to prepare our children to take their place as citizens in our democracy.” Federal Hocking is a rural school in Appalachian Ohio which has been recognized as a Coalition of Essential Schools Mentor School, a First Amendment School, and as one of America’s 100 Best by Readers’ Digest. Wood also directed the Ohio High School Transformation Initiative’s Small School Leadership Institute that opened 80 new small high schools were opened in the urban areas of Ohio. Wood has authored several books including Time To Learn, Schools that Work, and Many Children Left Behind (with Deborah Meier).

March 24

Tony Wagner, Ed.D.

Harvard Graduate School of Education

“The Global Achievement Gap”

In a Q&A on the Harvard Graduate School of Education web site, Wagner discusses his most recent book, “The Global Achievement Gap: Why Even Our Best Schools Don’t Teach The New Survival Skills Our Children Need–and What We Can Do About It,” in which he defines the concept in the title as “the gap between what we are teaching and testing in our schools, even in the ones that are most highly-regarded, versus the skills all students will need for careers, college, and citizenship in the 21st century.” In the book Wagner argues that the gap should be grabbed by business leaders to guide a much-needed conversation with educators. Wagner is co-director of the Change Leadership Group (CLG) at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and is a faculty member of the Executive Leadership Program for Educators at the school. He has been senior advisor to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation for the past eight years, first executive director of Educators for Social Responsibility; project director for the Public Agenda Foundation in New York; and President and CEO of the Institute for Responsive Education. He earned his Master’s in teaching and doctorate in education at Harvard.

April 21

William Charles “Bill” Ayers, Ph.D.

University of Illinois at Chicago College of Education

“Problems and Possibilities for Democratic School Reform”

Ayers is an American elementary education theorist focused on education reform, curriculum, and instruction. He is a Distinguished Professor of Education and Senior University Scholar in the College of Education at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He has authored several books on education, including “The Good Preschool Teacher: Six Teachers Reflect on Their Lives” (1989), “To Teach: The Journey of a Teacher” (1993), and “Teaching for Social Justice: A Democracy and Education Reader” (1998). Ayers earned his bachelor’s degree in American studies from The University of Michigan and his doctorate in curriculum and teaching from Bank Street College of Education.

About Pace University

For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, Pace enrolls nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

Visit Pace at Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube; follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Pace University Welcomes Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre’s Love’s Labour’s Lost

When the curtain goes up on Shakespeare’s Globe company’s performance of Love’s Labour’s Lost on December 8 at Pace University, it will mark the company’s first New York appearance since the sold-out tour of Merry Wives of Windsor in 2005. Now directed by Dominic Dromgoole, who succeeded Mark Rylance in 2003 as Artistic Director, Love’s Labour’s Lost will be completing a two-month national tour with performances through Monday evening, December 21. Opening Night is Thursday, December 10th at 8pm. Both the 2005 and 2009 tours were produced by John Luckacovic and Eleanor Oldham of 2Luck Concepts.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contacts: (Pace University) Chris Cory, 212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu or Samuella Becker, 212-346-1637, cell 917-734-5172, sbecker2@pace.edu; (Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre) Richard Kornberg 212-944-9444, Richard@Kornbergpr.com

NEW YORK CITY WELCOMES SHAKESPEARE’S GLOBE THEATRE’S LOVE’S LABOUR’S LOST

When the curtain goes up on Shakespeare’s Globe company’s performance of Love’s Labour’s Lost on December 8 at Pace University, it will mark the company’s first New York appearance since the sold-out tour of Merry Wives of Windsor in 2005. Now directed by Dominic Dromgoole, who succeeded Mark Rylance in 2003 as Artistic Director, Love’s Labour’s Lost will be completing a two-month national tour with performances through Monday evening, December 21. Opening Night is Thursday, December 10th at 8pm. Both the 2005 and 2009 tours were produced by John Luckacovic and Eleanor Oldham of 2Luck Concepts.

In Love’s Labour’s Lost self-denial is in fashion at the court of Navarre where the young King and three of his noblemen solemnly forswear the company of women in favor of serious study. But the lovely, sharp-tongued Princess of France and her all-too-lovely entourage soon arrive with other ideas and it isn’t long before young love, with its flirtations, hesitations and embarrassments, has broken every self-imposed rule set by the young men.

Written shortly after he completed the sonnets, Shakespeare’s boisterous send-up of all those who try to turn their back on life, is a festive parade of every weapon in the youthful playwright’s comic arsenal: from excruciating cross-purposes and impersonations, to drunkenness, fist-fights and pratfalls. Even more, it is a joyful banquet of language, full of puns, rhymes, bizarre syntax, grotesque coinages and parodies, which the company made their own through a unique rehearsal process for performances at Shakespeare’s Globe in 2007, and a revival last summer. And appropriately enough, it is a play that Queen Elizabeth the first commanded for her own holiday festivities nearly 400 years ago.

Contuning in their leading-roles in the touringproduction are Michelle Terry as The Princess of France and Trystan Gravelle as Berowne, along with Seroca Davis, Christopher Godwin, William Mannering, Rhiannon Oliver and Andrew Vincent. Joining them in the Globe company are Jade Anouka, Phil Cumbus, Jack Farthing, Patrick Godfrey, Fergal McElherron, Thomasin Rand, Paul Ready, Siân Robins-Grace and Tom Stuart.

The production has designs by Jonathan Fensom and music by Claire van Kampen. “Love’s Labour’s Lost” will employ Renaissance staging, costume and music, as well as a seating arrangement and staging designed to involve the audience as nearly as possible in the physical immediacy of seeing a play at The Globe, with actors moving beyond the stage, and the theatre bathed in “daylight” at all times.

Dominic Dromgoole is the Artistic Director of Shakespeare’s Globe. His previous work at the Globe includes King Lear, Love’s Labour’s Lost, Coriolanus and Antony and Cleopatra. This season he is also directing Romeo and Juliet and A New World: A Life of Thomas Paine by Trevor Griffiths. He was Artistic Director of the Oxford Stage Company (1999-2005) and the Bush Theatre (1990-1996), and Director of New Plays for the Peter Hall Company (1996/7). He has also directed at the Tricycle Theatre, in the West End, and in America and Romania. Dominic has written two books, The Full Room (2001) and Will & Me (2006).

Jonathan Fensom most recently worked at Stratford Shakespeare Festival as the designer of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Jonathan was nominated for a Tony Award for his set design for Journey’s End in 2007 and was associate designer on Disney’s The Lion King, which premièred at the New Amsterdam Theatre on Broadway and has subsequently opened worldwide. He has designed more than 50 productions worldwide, from Shakespeare to ballet to modern classics. Other recent productions include King Lear and Love’s Labour’s Lost at Shakespeare’s Globe; Swan Lake for San Francisco Ballet; The Faith Healer, Journey’s End, The American Plan and Pygmalion in New York; Rain Man, Some Girls, Twelfth Night and Crown Matrimonial in the West End; The Homecoming and Big White Fog at the Almeida Theatre; Happy Now?, The Mentalists and Burn/Citizenship/Chatroom at the National Theatre; Talking to Terrorists and The Sugar Syndrome at the Royal Court Theatre; and National Anthems at the Old Vic.

Claire van Kampen trained at the Royal College of music, specialising in the performance of contemporary music, and studying composition with Dr. Ruth Gipps. In 1986 she joined the RSC and the Royal National Theatre, becoming the first female musical director with both companies. Her international career as composer, performer, writer and broadcaster has produced scores for many theatre productions, television and film. In 1990 she co-founded the theatre company Phoebus Cart with Mark Rylance. Their production of Shakespeare’s The Tempest was performed in the foundations of the Globe in 1991. As Director of theatre Music during its founding ten years, Claire was involved in creating the music for over 30 Globe productions between 1997 and 2006. Recent Globe productions include: Love’s Labour’s Lost (2007), King Lear (2008) and Helen (2009). Awards include; the Vero Nihil Verius Award for Distinguished Achievement in the Arts by Concordia University (Oregon, USA), and the 2007 Sam Wanamaker Award (with Mark Rylance and Jenny Tiramani for their ‘Original Practices’ productions at the Globe.) Recent work includes: Observe the Sons of Ulster Marching Towards the Somme (Hampstead Theatre); Bash (West End); Boeing-Boeing (West End and Broadway, NY); I Am Shakespeare (Chichester Festival Theatre); Peer Gynt (Guthrie Theater, Minneapolis); Romeo and Juliet (Middle Temple Hall festival). Film: Nocturne (Ind.2009). As a writer, Claire is creating a new play about the castrato Farinelli, and also writing both book and music for Grand Central, a musical to be produced in New York.

Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre was founded by the late and pioneering American actor/director Sam Wanamaker, who persevered for nearly 30 years to rebuild a replica of the Globe near its original site in London. Since the Globe’s reopening by Her Majesty the Queen in 1997, the theatre has fulfilled its vision of recreating for audiences the infectious energy and spontaneity of Shakespeare plays as they were originally presented in an urban amphitheater.

Pace University’s Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, located in New Amsterdam’s original theatre district near City Hall in lower Manhattan, has presented a wide range of cultural programs and public events for the campus and surrounding community since 1969. In addition to student productions and special events, the Michael Schimmel Center was the home of Tony Randall’s National Actors Theatre, a founding venue of the Tribeca Film Festival and Tribeca Theater Festival, and a presenting partner of the River-to-River Festival. The Center also hosts international companies such as the Beijing People’s Art Theatre. When not in use for performances, the theatre is home to the award-winning television program Inside the Actors Studio.

Love’s Labour’s Lost will be performed at the Michael Schimmel Center at Pace University located at 3 Spruce Street, east of Park Row, near the corner of Gold Street.

Performances begin Tuesday, December 8th and follow a Tuesdays – Fridays at 8pm, Saturdays at 2 & 8, and Sundays at 3 & 7 schedule with no Tuesday, December 15th Performance, and closing Monday, December 21st at 8pm.

Tickets are $25-$75 and available through www.smarttix.com or by calling 212-868-4444.

Nov 18 – “Pictures & Poetry” – Schimmel Gallery – “An Evening of Frank O’Hara” – Photo Exhibit

“Pictures and Poetry” – Gallery opening of work by four celebrated photographers and evening of Frank O’Hara poetry at Pace University, NYC Downtown Campus, Schimmel Gallery. Book Signing and Q & A event takes place Wednesday, November 18, from 5:00 to 7:30 pm.

MEDIA ADVISORY

“Pictures and Poetry” – Gallery opening of work by four celebrated photographers and evening of Frank O’Hara poetry

Pace University, NYC Downtown Campus, Schimmel Gallery

Wednesday, November 18, 5:00 -7:30 pm

Book Signing, Q & A, Refreshments, Free – Public Welcome

• Through the Lens – Black & white photography (31 images) featuring artists Sally Gall, Jerome Liebling, Caleb Cain Marcus and Jill Mathis. Collection donated by Nathan M. Perlmutter ‘71 and Rosalyn Perlmutter.

• Writing Worth Reading: An Evening of Frank O’Hara –Hettie Jones and Tony Towle offer personal anecdotes of the poet as they read from his work.

Why/Where: Season opening of The Gallery at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts at Pace University, 3 Spruce Street, New York City. Directions – http://www.pace.edu/pace/about-us/all-about-pace/directions-to-all-campuses/new-york-city-campus

When/What: Wednesday, November 18, 2009. 5:00 to 6:00 p.m: Wine and Cheese reception. 6:00 to 7:30 p.m: An Evening of Frank O’Hara with poetry readings by Hettie Jones and Tony Towle, followed by question & answer session, book signing (books by all three poets available for sale) and dessert reception (coffee and sweets).

After November 18, Exhibit Continues: Although the Frank O’Hara poetry reading is one night only, the 31-piece photography exhibit will be on display at the Schimmel Gallery through Wednesday, December 2. Public viewing schedule: Thursdays from 4 to 8 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. Closed November 25 -29 for the Thanksgiving holiday weekend. Free admission.

Who’s Who – Poetry Reading

Frank O’Hara. O’Hara is one of the most beloved poets in modern times. During the 1950s and 1960s – until his death in a tragic accident at the age of 40 – he was a charismatic figure in the New York City cultural world. In addition to being an innovative and highly influential poet, he was an art critic and an important curator at the Museum of Modern Art. He also led an involved, hectic social life which continues to fascinate readers.

Hettie Jones. Jones married the then unpublished poet LeRoi Jones (now Amiri Baraka) in 1958. One of the few visible interracial couples at the time, the two were at the center of the downtown bohemian New York literary, jazz and art worlds. Her memoir How I Became Hettie Jones describes this period in her life and was listed by the New York Times in its Notable Books of the year. Her most recent poetry book, Doing 70, came out in 2007. She is the former Chair of the PEN Prison Writing Committee and currently a member of PEN’s Advisory Council.

Tony Towle. O’Hara was the mentor who changed his life. Since meeting O’Hara in 1962, Towle has published 12 books of poetry and a prose memoir and has received numerous awards, including the Gotham Book Mart Avant-Garde Poetry prize, an NEA Fellowship and an Ingram Merrill Foundation Fellowship. His book North (1970) was the third winner of the Frank O’Hara Award for Experimental Poetry. Like O’Hara, he has been involved in the art world, both as an art writer and as Administrative Assistant at the legendary printmaking center Universal Limited Art Editions on Long Island, where he has worked with Larry Rivers, Robert Motherwell, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, Claes Oldenburg and other prominent artists.

Who’s Who – Photographers

Sally Gall – Sally Gall gained national recognition for her landscape photography of formal gardens, serene seascapes and farmed topography taken throughout Europe. Void of people, Gall’s photographs embrace notions of romanticism, focusing on the simplicity and beauty that nature inspires. Her images are part of numerous public and private collections, including the Whitney Museum of American Art (New York, NY), The Guggenheim Museum (New York, NY), The Museum of Fine Arts (Houston, TX) and The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, among others. Pace’s exhibit will feature 13 of her landscapes, shot from 1980 to 1997. She lives in New York City.

Jerome Liebling – Liebling’s career as a photographer, filmmaker and teacher spans nearly 50 years. In the 1940s, he studied under Walter Rosenblum and Paul Strand, and joined New York’s famed Photo League. In collaboration with filmmaker Allen Downs, he has produced several award-winning documentaries, including Pow Wow, The Tree is Dead and The Old Men. Liebling has received numerous awards and grants, including two Guggenheim fellowships and a NEA Photographic Survey Grant. His photographs are in the permanent collections of many museums, including the Museum of Modern Art (New York, NY), Boston Museum of Fine Arts and Corcoran Gallery of Art (Washington, DC). Pace will display 10 images from Liebling, spanning the years 1947 to 1974.

Caleb Cain Marcus. Marcus’s photographs are the discovery of solitude found within the confines of urban life. They reflect the beauty in open space that was once filled with chaos … and at night has only darkness and silence. The photographs urge us to slow down, to look, experience and breathe. Three of Marcus’s images, all shot in India in 2005, will be displayed. He lives in New York City, where he is also a professional tango dancer and instructor.

Jill Mathis. After living in New York City for five years, four of which were spent as the full-time assistant to American art photographer Ralph Gibson, Mathis moved to Italy with husband, the sculptor, Valerio Tedeschi. Her work can be found in various collections, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Jewish Museum and the International Center of Photography. Five of Mathis’s photographs will be shown, created from 1996 to 2005. Roger Sayre, Curator. Sayre, a Professor of Fine Arts at Pace University, has curated over 70 exhibits, in addition to having solo and group shows of his own. His most recent was the David Poppie collaboration, “Remixed Media,” seen at Open Square Gallery (Holyoke, MA) in Spring 2009. Sayre’s art has been reviewed by The New York Times on several occasions (national and international editions), as well as by publications throughout the world.

About Poets@Pace: Sponsor of poetry part of the evening. Poets@Pace was created in 2008 under the sponsorship of Provost Geoffrey L. Brackett, DPhil (Oxon.) to make the University’s cultural arts more visible to students and the community. It is directed by Professor Charles North, Pace’s Poet-in-Residence and the 2008 Foundation for Contemporary Arts Grant winner who has published 10 books, won two National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships and four Fund for Poetry Awards.

Media RSVP: Samuella Becker, Pace University, Public Information, sbecker2@pace.edu or 212-346-1637 (office); 917-734-5172 (cell).

General Public RSVP: By November 16 to Galleries@Pace.edu

About Pace. For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter | Flickr | YouTube. Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

From Boy Soldier to New York Times Bestselling Author: Ishmael Beah to Speak at Pace

Ishmael Beah, author of the New York Times best seller, “A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier,” will be giving a lecture at Pace University’s Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts theater on Wednesday, May 7, 2008 at 5:30p.m. The lecture will be followed by a book signing in the Schimmel Lobby.

MEDIA ADVISORY
Contact
Cara Halstead Cea, 914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLING AUTHOR ISHMAEL BEAH TO APPEAR AT PACE UNIVERSITY

Lecture will be followed by a signing of Beah’s best-seller, “A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier”

NEW YORK, NY – Ishmael Beah, author of the New York Times best seller, “A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier,” will be giving a lecture at Pace University’s Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts theater on Wednesday, May 7, 2008 at 5:30p.m. The lecture will be followed by a book signing in the Schimmel Lobby.

In A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier, Beah documents his story of devastation and redemption, his struggle to heal, forgive himself, and regain his humanity.

Born in Sierra Leone, West Africa in 1980, Beah was recruited by the government army during a bloody civil war to fight at the tender age of 13. He was rescued by UNICEF and by 1998, moved to the United States where he subsequently finished his last two years of high school at the United National International School in New York. He graduated from Oberlin College in 2004.

He is a member of the Human Rights Watch Children’s Rights Division Advisory Committee and has spoken before the Council on Foreign Relations, the Center for Emerging Threats and Opportunities (CETO) at the Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory, and many other NGO panels on children affected by war. He has also spoken before the United Nations on several occasions. His work has appeared in Vespertine Press and LIT magazine. He currently lives in New York City.

The Schimmel Center for the Arts is part of Pace University’s downtown Manhattan campus East of City Hall, entrance on Spruce Street. The event is free and open to the public. Media admission by press pass. Seating is limited. Contact Patricia Balachich at pb93712n@pace.edu if you plan to attend.

This event is cosponsored by Pace University’s Office of the Provost, School of Education and Phi Delta Kappa, an international professional education association.

Lipton Named 2008 Recipient of Pace University’s Leaders in Management Award

Pace University will pay tribute to James Lipton with its prestigious Leaders in Management Award on Tuesday, April 29 in the Rainbow Room at 30 Rockefeller Plaza in New York City.

James Lipton Named 2008 Recipient of Pace University’s Leaders in Management Award for Entrepreneurial Achievements in Higher Education as Founding Dean of the Actors Studio Drama School and Creator of Inside the Actors Studio

– Award Dinner and Benefit on April 29 in New York City, Sponsorships Available –

Dinner Committee Co-Chairs and Members (in alphabetical order):
Alec Baldwin, Aniello A. Bianco, Stephen & Sharon Baum, Mark M. Besca, Jason & Haley Binn, Ellen Burstyn,
M. Graham Coleman, Esq., James B. Duffy, Mr. & Mrs. Jonathan Farkas, Jane Fonda, Alan Flusser, Barry M. Gosin,
John & Susan Gutfreund, Joan & George Hornig, Nathan Lane, Gary Lico, Pamela Liebman, Bill Nelson,
Michael O’Reilly, Joseph M. Pastore Jr., PhD, Gerald Schoenfeld, Ivan G. Seidenberg, Richard E. Snyder,
Kevin Spacey, David Verklin, and Lauren Zalaznick

March 28, 2008 – Pace University will pay tribute to James Lipton with its prestigious Leaders in Management Award on Tuesday, April 29 in the Rainbow Room at 30 Rockefeller Plaza in New York City.

Lipton, the 45th recipient of the award, is being honored for his pivotal role as the visionary behind the Actors Studio Drama School, a graduate degree-granting program which, with him as its founding dean, became the nation’s largest graduate drama school.

Lipton also created a course within the school – a noncredit academic craft seminar that came to be known as Inside the Actors Studio, where successful and accomplished actors, directors and writers are interviewed by Lipton and answer questions from Pace MFA students. The Actors Studio Drama School is a graduate program of Pace University and Inside the Actors Studio originates from the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts on Pace’s lower Manhattan campus.

In October 2007, Lipton’s newest book, Inside Inside was published by Dutton. The book is an account of the past 13 years of his life as the Dean of the Actors Studio Drama School and creator of Inside the Actor’s Studio. Autographed copies will be given out to all guests attending Pace’s Leaders in Management Award dinner. Guests will also be treated to renditions from Lipton’s Broadway musical Sherry! performed by undergraduate students in Pace’s BFA Musical Theater program.

Merlin. “In honoring James Lipton, we pay tribute to his creative brilliance, superior intellect, dedicated teaching and profound hard work,” said Pace President Stephen J. Friedman. “He is a Merlin inspiration to those aspiring Arthurs who hope to capture an Oscar, Emmy, or Tony of their own and ultimately appear center stage, as a blue-card guest celebrity on Inside the Actors Studio.”

Over the years, Lipton has received countless honors in the world of the arts, including three honorary PhDs, knighthood in France’s Order of Arts and Letters and the Lifetime Achievement Award from The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences in 2007. However, for the first time in his distinguished career, he will be recognized for his entrepreneurial and visionary talents as the architect of the only drama school in America that trains actors, writers and directors side by side for three years in a master’s degree program.

In 1993, as all of New York’s cultural institutions faced a tightening financial environment, Lipton literally awakened one morning with a concept that was revolutionary for the famously private Actors Studio: a proposal that it open its doors, not to let the world in, but for the first time to let the Method it had honed for 47 years out, in a ground-breaking academic program.

Rising to the challenge, the committee formed by the Studio, comprising Ellen Burstyn, Lee Grant, Carlyn Glynn, Paul Newman, Norman Mailer, Robert Wankel and Arthur Penn, and led by Lipton, shaped the three-year MFA that would become the largest graduate drama school in the nation.

Simultaneously with the inauguration of the Actors Studio Drama School in September, 1994, Lipton, as its founding dean, created a series of forums to which he invited, in a round of letters, Studio members and colleagues “to come and teach our students.” When he received immediate responses from artists who included Paul Newman, Alec Baldwin, Dennis Hopper, Sally Field and Sidney Lumet, he sent word back into the world from which he had come “on the chance that these people may say something worth preserving.” The Bravo network took the existential leap with the Studio, and Inside the Actors Studio was born.

Since 1994, as Executive Producer, writer and host of the series, Lipton has faced more than 200 of the world’s most accomplished artists on the school’s stage, to create the unique craft archive that is now seen in 84 million American homes on Bravo and around the world in 125 countries, and has received 13 Emmy Award nominations in its first 13 years. The questions on the 300 to 500 blue cards Lipton uses during his interviews are based on information he compiles during the two weeks it takes him to prepare each program.

The result, as the New York Times has said, is that “In Mr. Lipton’s guest chair, actors cease being stars for a while and become artists and teachers.” The syndicated columnist Liz Smith wrote, “No actor, no matter how famous, says ‘No’ to James Lipton,” and Matt Lauer on The Today Show has called him the best celebrity interviewer in America.

Other Career Highlights. As writer and producer, Lipton has brought hundreds of hours of variety specials, movies, series, and performing arts programs to television. He wrote and produced President Jimmy Carter’s Inaugural Concert, the first presidential gala ever televised, and The Road to China, the first American entertainment program from the People’s Republic of China. As a playwright and lyricist, his Broadway accomplishments include the book and lyrics of Nowhere to Go but Up and Sherry! As an actor, he has appeared on the sitcom Arrested Development, in the movie Bewitched with his alter ego Will Ferrell, on ABC’s According to Jim, and The Simpsons. In the fall of 2008, he will be seen – and heard – in two major animation films, Disney’s Bolt and the Weinstein Company’s Igor. As himself, he has made numerous guest appearances on Late Night with Conan O’Brien and The Jimmy Kimmel Show.

Perhaps Mr. Lipton’s most significant achievements have come in the field of literature where he has made his mark in non-fiction with An Exaltation of Larks that has been in print since 1968, prompting Penguin Publishers to call it “a classic;” in fiction with the novel Mirrors, which he brought to the screen as well as screenwriter and producer; and in autobiography with his recently published “Inside Inside,” which Kirkus Reviews described as “A worthy – perhaps even enviable – life, related with passion, certitude, and considerable artistry.”

Leaders in Management Award. Past recipients of the prestigious award, an annual Pace tradition since 1962, include Michael O’Reilly, The Chubb Corporation; Barry M. Gosin, Newmark Knight Frank; Thomas Hays, Fortune Brands; Herbert Henkel, Ingersoll-Rand Company; Eugene R. McGrath, Consolidated Edison; Edward D. Miller, AXA Financial Inc.; David Rockefeller, The Chase Manhattan Bank and Ivan G. Seidenberg, Verizon Communications.

The annual awards dinner traditionally raises money for student scholarships, but this year’s event will premiere a new philanthropic target: it will be the formal launch of a fund earmarked for a theater in lower Manhattan that the Actors Studio Drama School MFA program can call its own.

Pace is also in the second year of “It’s Time: The Centennial Campaign for Pace University” with a goal of $100 million which will help Pace reshape itself for its second century. Money raised as of February 29, 2008: $81.1 million – http://www.pace.edu/itstime/index.html

About Pace University: For 102 years Pace University has combined exceptional academics with professional experiences and the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling more than 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Media Contact:
Samuella R. Becker
Pace University, Public Information
sbecker2@pace.edu
212-346-1637 or 917-734-5172

Sponsorship Information:
Sharon E. McCullough
President, Expert Events
sharon@expertevents.com
215-546-9422 or 212-229-1341