Newsday: Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing Awarded Scholarships through the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing in the College of Health Professions has been selected for the third time as a grant recipient of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) New Careers in Nursing Scholarship Program (NCIN).

News of a grant for nursing scholarships at Pace was covered by media nationwide including Newsday.

From Newsday:

Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing in the College of Health Professions has been selected for the third time as a grant recipient of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) New Careers in Nursing Scholarship Program (NCIN).  The Lienhard School of Nursing received $50,000 for the 2013-2014 academic year to support students in the Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing program who are underrepresented in the field of nursing and are pursuing second careers. Five students entering Lienhard’s accelerated degree program in January 2014 will be awarded NCIN scholarships of $10,000 each.

NCIN is a program of RWJF and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN). Pace University was among the first institutions to receive funding through the RWJF New Careers in Nursing Scholarship Program in 2008; the program has already supported 20 Lienhard students. With the five additional students this year, Pace will have received a total of a quarter of a million dollars through the NCIN program.

Lienhard offered the second Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing program in the country. Since 1984, Pace has offered this accelerated curriculum for college graduates who are not nurses to study and earn a first professional nursing degree. Students who graduate in as little as 12 months are eligible to take the licensure exam and consistently pass at 100%. The school also prides itself on preparing culturally competent leaders.

“We are grateful for this opportunity to help ensure the nursing field has a diverse population of culturally competent practitioners,” said Harriet R. Feldman, Dean of the Lienhard School of Nursing and of Pace’s College of Health Professions. “Our NCIN scholars go on to do great things – from winning Fulbright awards that enable them to work abroad, to doing research locally to improve the care of the elderly and more.”

Ted Bailly, a NCIN scholar, recently won best poster at the National Gerontological Nursing Association (NGNA) conference.  His research poster was entitled “Student Perceptions of Older Adults: Outcomes of an Aging Sensitivity Program, A Qualitative Inquiry.”  Bailly is a graduate of the BSN portion of the accelerated program and is currently a Family Nurse Practitioner student.  Bailly speaks about being a NCIN scholar here: http://www.pace.edu/lienhard/cdp-student-testimonials.

Read the full article here.

Nursing Spectrum: Local nursing schools at forefront of teaching, recruiting diversity

Nursing Professor Martha Greenberg was interviewed for a story in Nursing Spectrum on preparing future nurses in cultural competency.

Nursing Professor Martha Greenberg was interviewed for a story in Nursing Spectrum (Nurse.com) on preparing future nurses in cultural competency.

From Nurse.com:

“…Cultural competency has been a part of nursing curricula for years. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing updated its framework to facilitate the attainment of cultural competence in baccalaureate nursing in 2008. But the importance of understanding cultures seems to be more pronounced today as the country’s minority populations grow along with gaps in healthcare quality.

“It [has been] long known that culture is a determinant of access to healthcare, specific treatment modalities and healthcare decisions,” said Martha J. Greenberg, RN, PhD, associate professor and chairwoman of undergraduate nursing at Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing, Pleasantville, N.Y. “Treatment and treatment responses to disease, morbidity and mortality are linked to memberships in cultural groups. Differences in positive health outcomes are disproportionately low in racial and ethnic minorities, and these differences lead to disparities in healthcare.”

As a result, schools including Adelphi University in Garden City, N.Y., are updating undergraduate nursing curriculums to include more emphasis on cultural understanding, said Patrick Coonan, RN, EdD, FACHE, dean of nursing at Adelphi.

Pace offers two undergraduate courses on cultural competence. One, a nursing elective for four-year students, focuses on the major ethnic and cultural groups, as well as dominant American beliefs as they pertain to nursing and healthcare. Cultural Mindfulness, a required RN/BS course, focuses on the impact of culture and diversity in the delivery of nursing and healthcare to individuals, families, groups and the community, Greenberg said.”

Local nursing schools at forefront of teaching, recruiting diversity | New York Nursing News.