Professor Karen “Toby” Haghenbeck Honored for 30 Years of Service as a Critical Care Nurse

Toby Haghenbeck, Assistant Professor at Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University in Pleasantville, NY recently received national recognition for reaching a significant milestone in the nursing profession: Since 1979 she has consistently maintained CCRN® certification offered through AACN Certification Corporation. Toby Haghenbeck is one of 108 CCRNs being honored this year by the corporation and the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses for 30 years of continuous certification.

Posted on behalf of The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY FACULTY MEMBER RECOGNIZED FOR CAREER MILESTONE AS CRITICAL CARE NURSE

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, August 10, 2009 – Toby Haghenbeck, Assistant Professor at Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University in Pleasantville, NY recently received national recognition for reaching a significant milestone in the nursing profession: Since 1979 she has consistently maintained CCRN® certification offered through AACN Certification Corporation. Toby Haghenbeck is one of 108 CCRNs being honored this year by the corporation and the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses for 30 years of continuous certification.

CCRN certification is an expert credential reserved for those who meet rigorous practice, continuing education and testing requirements in their specialty; it is not the same as an RN license, which assures the public that a nurse has the required entry-level knowledge and skills to care for patients. Certification has been linked to fewer medical errors and increased job satisfaction and confidence. Hospitals that encourage and support their nurses in becoming certified demonstrate to their patients a high level of commitment to creating an exceptional care environment and, to their nurses, a culture of professionalism and retention imperative in today’s healthcare environment.

Professor Haghenbeck has also been appointed as Director of the RN4 program at Lienhard, effective fall 2009. The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) is the largest specialty nursing organization in the world, representing the interests of more than 400,000 critical care nurses. Its international headquarters are located in Aliso Viejo, Calif. Founded in 1969, the association has more than 240 chapters worldwide and is working toward a healthcare system driven by the needs of patients and their families, where critical care nurses make their optimal contribution. Complete information about AACN is available on the Internet at www.aacn.org.

AACN Certification Corporation provides comprehensive credentials for nurses who establish and maintain standards of excellence in acute and critical care nursing and who contribute to the achievement of optimal health outcomes for persons experiencing acute and life-threatening illness. The Corporation certifies more than 50,000 nurses in the areas of acute and critical care nursing.

Dean Feldman Named Chair of National Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education

At a time of enormous demand for nurses, Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, a Bellmore, NY resident and dean of Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing since 1993, has been re-elected the 2009 chair of the Board of Commissioners of the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), the national nonprofit agency that exclusively accredits baccalaureate and higher degree programs in nursing.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Cara Halstead Cea, Public Information, Pace University 914-773-3312 (Office), 914-906-9680 (Cell) chalstead@pace.edu

Photo editors: a 300 dpi jpeg head shot of Dean Feldman and photographs of her with students are available through Cara Halstead Cea (above).

Influential role for influential dean DEAN OF PACE UNIVERSITY’S LIENHARD SCHOOL OF NURSING NAMED CHAIR OF NATIONAL COMMISSION ON COLLEGIATE NURSING EDUCATION

Harriet R. Feldman also gets accepted to Harvard program

NEW YORK, NY – At a time of enormous demand for nurses, Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, a Bellmore, NY resident and dean of Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing since 1993, has been re-elected the 2009 chair of the Board of Commissioners of the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), the national nonprofit agency that exclusively accredits baccalaureate and higher degree programs in nursing.

She has also been chosen as a member of Harvard’s Institute for Management and Leadership in Education (MLE) Class of 2009 to be held from June 14–26, 2009.

During Feldman’s leadership of the organization, CCNE has: • Amended the standards for accreditation of baccalaureate and graduate degree nursing programs to address baccalaureate and master’s degree nursing programs, as well as Doctor of Nursing Practice programs. • Trained a cadre of over 100 new on-site evaluators to serve as volunteer peer reviewers in the CCNE accreditation process. • Participated as an organizational member in the advanced practice nursing consensus work group and endorsed the resulting consensus model for advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) regulation which includes licensure, accreditation, certification and education. • Amended the procedures for accreditation of baccalaureate and graduate degree nursing programs to address baccalaureate and master’s degree nursing programs, as well as Doctor of Nursing Practice programs. • Re-trained all active CCNE evaluators to the amended Standards and Procedures.

Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing is among the first institutions in the nation to receive funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) through the RWJF New Careers in Nursing Scholarship Program. Grants provided through this program are being used to increase the number of students enrolled in Lienhard’s accelerated baccalaureate nursing program, the Combined Degree Program (CDP). This national initiative, launched by RWJF and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), aims to help alleviate the nation’s nursing shortage by dramatically expanding the pipeline of students in accelerated nursing programs. The LSN received a $120,000 grant that will allow the school to award twelve scholarships of $10,000 each to students who are “underrepresented” in nursing and enroll in the CDP in spring 2009.

Bottlenecks and politics. Feldman is emerging as a national authority on three major trends that are changing the nursing profession – the shortage of nurses and nurse educators, the involvement of nurses in promoting health policy, and the promotion of evidence-based procedures in education and nursing practice.

Feldman has published more than 90 books, book chapters, refereed journal articles, and editorials that have focused on leadership, the nursing and faculty shortages, the role of nurses in the political arena, and evidence-based practice. She has especially spoken out on the nursing shortage and the bottleneck to educating more nurses that is being created by a parallel shortage of nursing faculty members.

Under her direction, the Lienhard School was a leader in a consortium of health-related institutions in New York’s Hudson Valley that in 2005 won a $1.03 million US Labor Department grant to help open that bottleneck. The funds provide monetary credits to healthcare facilities in exchange for loaning Master’s-prepared nurses to teach clinical courses, thereby making it possible to enroll greater numbers of nursing students

Partly as a result, the Lienhard School’s enrollment is up this fall by about 70 students, the fourth year with such an increase. Lienhard’s Family Nurse Practitioner Program is ranked ninth nationally in the U.S. News & World Report survey of “America’s Best Graduate Schools 2008.” Building on this reputation, the Lienhard School started a new Doctor of Nursing Practice program in September 2008 to address the need for practitioners with the most advanced level of clinical nursing practice in which they will design, implement, evaluate and continuously improve health care delivery and outcomes.

Feldman has testified in Congress and written numerous articles and letters to editors on nursing policy, becoming a nationally known figure both within her field and in the media. For her legislative work in addressing the shortage, she received the “STAR” award for grassroots political advocacy from the Association of American Colleges of Nursing.

Prized books. In the last six years, Feldman has edited four award-winning books. “Nurses in the Political Arena: The Public Face of Nursing” (2000), with Sandra Lewenson, EdD, RN, FAAN received an American Journal of Nursing (AJN) Book of the Year award and a Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Print Media Award. That was soon followed by “The Nursing Shortage: Strategies for Recruitment and Retention in Clinical Practice and Education” (2003), “Educating Nurses for Leadership” (2005, with Martha J. Greenberg, PhD, RN), and “Teaching Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing” (2006, with Rona F. Levin, PhD, RN), all three of which also received AJN Book of the Year awards.

Feldman is on US Representative Nita Lowey’s (D-NY) Health Advisory Committee and an active emeritus member on the board of Nurses Educational Fund, Inc. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and a Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine, and past editor of the journals Nursing Leadership Forum and Scholarly Inquiry for Nursing Practice.

She received her BS and MS degrees in nursing from Adelphi University and her PhD in nursing science from New York University.

About Pace. For 101 years Pace University has combined exceptional academics with professional experiences and the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York enrolling more than 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

Lienhard School Wins Nearly $1 Million to Enhance New Nursing Doctoral Program

At a time when the US population is increasingly diverse and quality patient outcomes and patient safety are hot topics in health care, Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing has won a three-year federal grant of nearly $1 million to enhance its new doctoral program in the areas of cultural competence and evidence-based practice.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Cara Halstead Cea, 914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu or Joanne K. Singleton, PhD, 212-346-1903, jsingleton@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF NURSING WINS FEDERAL GRANT OF NEARLY $1 MILLION TO ENHANCE TRAINING IN MULTICULTURAL ISSUES, PRACTICES BASED ON RESEARCH $900,439 grant from U.S.

Department of Health and Human Services will deepen new doctoral program’s emphasis on primary care for underserved populations

NEW YORK, NY – At a time when the US population is increasingly diverse and quality patient outcomes and patient safety are hot topics in health care, Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing has won a three-year federal grant of nearly $1 million to enhance its new doctoral program in the areas of cultural competence and evidence-based practice.

According to Lienhard Dean Harriet R. Feldman, the changes will help keep Lienhard “a step ahead of the rest” in the burgeoning national effort to make sure students are prepared to address the needs of diverse populations using the best available evidence. The award comes from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services under its Advanced Education Nursing Grant program. The grant will help provide curriculum enhancements for the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program that Lienhard announced this spring.

The enhancements will focus on increasing student and faculty expertise in the areas of cultural competence and evidence-based practice improvement. The DNP program is intended to educate students’ to reach the highest level of clinical practice in nursing. Currently, all enrolled students are Family Nurse Practitioners (FNPs). The first class of 24 enters this fall. Lienhard’s FNP program is ranked ninth in the nation by US News & World Report.

Both DNP faculty members and students will get additional training in cultural awareness and sensitivity, producing what has come to be known as “cultural competence.”

Instruction will expand in delivering primary care that draws on scientific evidence, one aspect of “evidence-based practice,” or EBP.

The training will focus especially on vulnerable groups. Feldman co-edited a recent book on the subject with Lienhard graduate chair, Rona F. Levin, “EBP is based on the idea that nurses can contribute to the development of a scientific base for nursing practice by critiquing and questioning standard guidelines, treatments and outcomes. It empowers nurses on the front lines to fix problems.”

Team leaders. National healthcare accrediting bodies including The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and The Joint Commission are urging healthcare organizations to assess their capacity to meet patients’ cultural needs not only with training, but with such care components as language services, religious and spiritual care, and special diets.

“This focus of this grant will help distinguish our Doctor of Nursing Practice program from the others. And the skills of cultural competence and evidence-based practice are what employers tell us they are looking for,” said Feldman.

Added Joanne K. Singleton, Ph.D., the Director of the FNP-DNP program and the Project Director for the grant, “Our students will be challenged to learn how to design, deliver and lead interdisciplinary primary health care teams in developing and implementing culturally-competent best practices. We expect our graduates to make significant contributions to the overall health of our nation, which will include addressing national health disparities.”

About the Lienhard School of Nursing: With classrooms and laboratories in culturally diverse urban and suburban settings, Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing is committed to innovation and excellence in education, research, and practice in primary health care. It has nearly doubled in size over the last five years, and now has more than 700 students enrolled in baccalaureate and master’s degree programs, all approved by the New York State Education Department and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. Lienhard partners with communities to foster human growth and dignity and provide primary care, and is devoted to preparing individuals, families, and communities at local, national, and international levels to meet health care demands now and in the future. Professional education at Pace University: Since 1906 Pace University has offered professional education that combines liberal arts with practical experience and the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York. It enrolls more than 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

New Doctor of Nursing Practice Degree Puts Pace University on Forefront of National Movement

Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing recently became one of only three institutions approved by New York State to offer a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree. The others are Columbia University and the University of Rochester.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Cara Halstead Cea, Pace University
914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu

NEW DOCTOR OF NURSING PRACTICE DEGREE PUTS PACE UNIVERSITY ON FOREFRONT OF NEW NATIONAL MOVEMENT IN NURSING EDUCATION

Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing becomes one of only three colleges in NY State to offer the degree

Level of preparation for advanced nursing practice roles is transitioning from masters to doctorate by 2015

NEW YORK, NY – Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing recently became one of only three institutions approved by New York State to offer a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree. The others are Columbia University and the University of Rochester.

The new DNP program will prepare nurses for the highest level of nursing practice. The degree is designed for those in advanced levels of direct clinical practice and in areas that support clinical practice administration, organizational management and leadership, and policy development.

Recruitment for the fall DNP program has begun. The school is accepting inquiries and applications at nursing@pace.edu, or (914) 773-3552.

A trend to change. Across the nation, nursing is moving in the direction of other health professions in the transition to the DNP. In October 2004, the members of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), the major voice of baccalaureate and higher degree nursing education programs, called for moving the level of preparation necessary for advanced nursing practice (ANP) roles from the master’s degree to the doctorate level by 2015. The AACN now recommends DNP programs for educating APNs and other nurses seeking top clinical positions. In 2005, the National Academy of Sciences also called for nursing to develop a non-research, clinical doctorate to prepare expert practitioners who can also serve as clinical faculty members, a need that the new DNP addresses.

DNP graduates will likely fill practice-leadership roles in a variety of settings, becoming managers of quality initiatives, executives in healthcare organizations, directors of clinical programs, and faculty members responsible for clinical program delivery and clinical teaching.

Research has established a clear link between higher levels of nursing education and better patient outcomes. According to the AACN, changing demands in health care require that nurses serving in specialty positions have the highest possible levels of scientific knowledge and practice expertise. These changes include: increased use of evidence-based practice, increasing complexity of patient care, rising national concerns about quality of care and patient safety, the national nursing shortage and shortages of doctorally prepared nursing faculty members to teach new nurses, and increasing educational expectations for the preparation of other health professionals.

Impact on nursing education and practice. Currently, advanced practice nurses, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, nurse midwives, and nurse anesthetists, are typically prepared in master’s degree programs, some of which carry a credit load equivalent to doctoral degrees in the other health professions. DNP curricula build on current master’s programs by providing education in areas including evidence-based practice, quality improvement, and systems thinking.

The DNP focuses especially on providing leadership for evidence-based practice. This requires competence in translating research into practice, evaluating evidence, applying research in decision-making, and implementing viable clinical innovations to change practices. DNP-prepared nurses will work alongside nurse researchers prepared in PhD, DNSc and other research-focused nursing doctorates to advance the science and practice of nursing.
About the Lienhard School of Nursing: With classrooms and laboratories in culturally diverse urban and suburban settings, Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing (LSN) is committed to innovation and excellence in education, research, and practice in primary health care. With more than 600 students enrolled in baccalaureate and master’s degree programs, all approved by the New York State Education Department and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, LSN partners with communities to foster human growth and dignity and provide primary care. The School is devoted to preparing individuals, families, and communities at local, national, and international levels to meet health care demands now and in the future.

About Pace University: For 101 years Pace University has combined exceptional academics with professional experiences and the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Lienhard’s Dean Feldman Named Chair of Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education and Honored at NYU

At a time of enormous demand for nurses, Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, a Bellmore, NY resident and dean of Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing since 1993, has been elected the 2008 chair of the Board of Commissioners of the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, the national nonprofit agency that exclusively accredits baccalaureate and higher degree programs in nursing.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Cara Halstead Cea, Public Information, Pace University
914-773-3312 (Office), 914-906-9680 (Cell) chalstead@pace.edu

Influential role for influential dean
DEAN OF PACE UNIVERSITY’S LIENHARD SCHOOL OF NURSING
NAMED CHAIR OF NATIONAL NURSING ACCREDITATION COMMISSION

Harriet R. Feldman also receives Grace E. Davidson award from NYU School of Nursing

NEW YORK, NY, November 29, 2007 – At a time of enormous demand for nurses, Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, a Bellmore, NY resident and dean of Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing since 1993, has been elected the 2008 chair of the Board of Commissioners of the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, the national nonprofit agency that exclusively accredits baccalaureate and higher degree programs in nursing.

She also was honored this month at her alma mater, New York University, with this year’s Grace E. Davidson award. The award recognizes outstanding contributions of nursing administrators to the education of nursing students.

“At a time when enormous demand for nurses could create temptations to cut corners on preparing the next generation of nurses, accreditation of nursing programs to serve the public interest is more vital than ever,” said Feldman. “I am pleased to be a member of this panel of individuals who broadly represent the interests of educators, deans, practitioners, employers, and community members.”

Bottlenecks and politics. Feldman is emerging as a national authority on three major trends that are changing the nursing profession – the shortage of nurses and nurse educators, the involvement of nurses in promoting health policy, and the promotion of evidence-based procedures in education and nursing practice.

Feldman has published more than 90 books, book chapters, refereed journal articles, and editorials that have focused on leadership, the nursing and faculty shortages, the role of nurses in the political arena, and evidence-based practice. She has especially spoken out on the nursing shortage and the bottleneck to educating more nurses that is being created by a parallel shortage of nursing faculty members.

Under her direction, the Lienhard School was a leader in a consortium of health-related institutions in New York’s Hudson Valley that in 2005 won a $1.03 million US Labor Department grant to help open that bottleneck. The funds provide monetary credits to healthcare facilities in exchange for loaning Master’s-prepared nurses to teach clinical courses, thereby making it possible to enroll greater numbers of nursing students

Partly as a result, the Lienhard School’s enrollment is up this fall by about 70 students, the fourth year with such an increase. Lienhard’s Family Nurse Practitioner Program is ranked ninth nationally in the U.S. News & World Report survey of “America’s Best Graduate Schools 2008.”
Building on this reputation, the Lienhard School received official word last week from New York State that its new Doctor of Nursing Practice program has been approved.

Feldman has testified in Congress and written numerous articles and letters to editors on nursing policy, becoming a nationally known figure both within her field and in the media. For her legislative work in addressing the shortage, she received the “STAR” award for grassroots political advocacy from the Association of American Colleges of Nursing.

Prized books. In the last six years, Feldman has edited four award-winning books. “Nurses in the Political Arena: The Public Face of Nursing” (2000), with Sandra Lewenson, EdD, RN, FAAN received an American Journal of Nursing (AJN) Book of the Year award and a Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Print Media Award. That was soon followed by “The Nursing Shortage: Strategies for Recruitment and Retention in Clinical Practice and Education” (2003), “Educating Nurses for Leadership” (2005, with Martha J. Greenberg, PhD, RN), and “Teaching Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing” (2006, with Rona F. Levin, PhD, RN), all three of which also received AJN Book of the Year awards.

Feldman is on US Representative Nita Lowey’s (D-NY) Health Advisory Committee and on the board of Nurses Educational Fund, Inc. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and a Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine, and past editor of the journals Nursing Leadership Forum and Scholarly Inquiry for Nursing Practice.

She received her BS and MS degrees in nursing from Adelphi University and her PhD in nursing science from New York University.

About Pace. For 101 years Pace University has combined exceptional academics with professional experiences and the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York enrolling more than 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

Thirty Pace University Nursing Students to Get Scholarships With Commitment to Work in NYC Hospitals

Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing and the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) today announced a $1.3 million program to provide nursing scholarships for 30 individuals in exchange for a commitment to work at an HHC facility for four years.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Cara Halstead, Public Information Officer, Pace University
914-773-3312 Office, 914-906-9680 Cell, chalstead@pace.edu
Ana Marengo, NYC HHC, 212-788-3386

Note: The first students accepted are available for interviews.

THIRTY PACE UNIVERSITY NURSING STUDENTS TO GET FREE TUITION IN EXCHANGE FOR FOUR YEAR COMMITMENT TO PRACTICE
IN NEW YORK CITY PUBLIC HOSPITALS

$1.3 million grant from Helene Fuld Health Trust, HSBC Bank USA, N.A., Trustee, will tap professionals who change careers to address critical nursing shortage

Program accelerates growing trend

NEW YORK, NY, May 14, 2007 – Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing and the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) today announced a $1.3 million program to provide nursing scholarships for 30 individuals in exchange for a commitment to work at an HHC facility for four years.

The program is designed to quickly move nursing graduates into the profession and serve as a model for addressing the national nursing shortage. It is the city’s first nursing program that will offer a residency program and include a service commitment to the public hospitals.

The program is funded by a $1.3 million grant to Pace from the Helene Fuld Health Trust, HSBC Bank USA, N.A., Trustee, the nation’s largest private funder devoted exclusively to nursing students and nursing education.

Scholarship grants worth $40,000 will be given to men and women who want to change careers, already have a bachelor’s degree, and can earn their undergraduate nursing degree in one year under Pace University’s combined degree program (CDP). The first ten students will begin their residencies this fall.

“The scholarship money can be a life-saver to some of these people, since many of them need to quit their jobs to complete the CDP within a year,” said Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, dean of Pace’s Lienhard School. “They generally are not eligible for many federal financial aid programs because they already have baccalaureate degrees.”

A Model that Works in Teaching. The scholarships cover tuition, and then a one-year paid Registered Nurse (RN) residency program with options to focus on critical care, specialty nursing, long term care and geriatrics.

The graduate RNs will conduct their residencies at HHC’s Coler Goldwater Specialty Hospital and Nursing Facility in Manhattan, Harlem Hospital Center in Manhattan, Woodhull Medical and Mental Health Center in Brooklyn, and Jacobi Medical Center in the Bronx. After the initial residency program, the RNs will work at HHC for an additional three years.

“We have seen successful incentive programs that recruit professionals to the teaching profession in exchange for a commitment to our city’s kids. Why not do the same to encourage talented individuals to consider nursing as a career with a promise to serve the 1.3 million patients who rely on the city’s public hospitals and nursing homes?” said Marie L. Ankner, MSN, RN, CNAA, Assistant Vice President of nursing for medical and professional affairs at HHC.

She added: “This effort is a true collaboration between a healthcare system and academia and is a win-win for all since it guarantees the hospitals a pool of employees while it assists students and institutions of higher education. We expect this program to be easily replicated by others who want to have an immediate impact on the nursing shortage.” (The US Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates a national need of 1.2 million new and replacement nurses by the year 2014.)

Trend to similar partnerships. Collaborative programs like this recently have gained momentum nationwide as an answer to the nursing shortage, with more and more partnerships forming to support these students. According to the website of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, a health care system such as HHC could spend more than $3 million in nurse recruitment costs over a three year period just to recruit the necessary number of qualified healthcare workers. The grant from the Helene Fuld Health Trust saves HHC some of that cost and increases the supply of qualified workers.

In addition to the $1.3 million grant, the Trust also has awarded Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing a $550,000 endowment, payable over the next three years, to be used for 10 scholarships of $2,500 a year to other students in the school’s CDP. Previous funding from the Helene Fuld Health Trust has benefited Pace students in programs including the Family Nurse Practitioner program.

Applicants for the grants may contact Sophie Kaufman, Administrative Director of the Center for Nursing Research, Clinical Practice and International Affairs at the Lienhard School of Nursing, Pace University, 861 Bedford Road, LH 314, Pleasantville, NY 10570, (914) 773-3336, skaufman@pace.edu.

Partnership members. For more than 100 years Pace University has been preparing students to become leaders in their fields by providing an education that combines exceptional academics with professional experience and the New York advantage. Pace has three campuses, in New York City, Westchester, and White Plains. A private metropolitan university, Pace enrolls nearly 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing (LSN) has been preparing nurses for more than 40 years and was one of the first in the nation to implement a special program for career changers over 30 years ago. With more than 600 students enrolled in baccalaureate and master’s degree programs, all approved by the New York State Education Department and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, LSN partners with communities to foster human growth and dignity and provide primary care. The School of Nursing is devoted to preparing individuals, families, and communities at local, national, and international levels, to meet health care demands now and in the future. For inquiries about the nursing programs at Pace, please email nursing@pace.edu, or call (914) 773-3552. www.pace.edu

Dating back to a foundation created in 1935 by Dr. Leonhard Felix Fuld and his sister, Florentine, in honor of their mother, Helene, the Helene Fuld Health Trust since 1969 has been overseen and administered by HSBC Bank USA, N.A.

The New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC), the largest municipal hospital and health care system in the country, is a $4.9 billion public benefit corporation that serves 1.3 million New Yorkers and about 400,000 who are uninsured. HHC provides medical, mental health and substance abuse services through its 11 acute care hospitals, four skilled nursing facilities, six large diagnostic and treatment centers and more than 80 community based health centers. For more information about HHC, visit www.nyc.gov/hhc.

Rep. Nita Lowey to be Honored Monday With Pace’s Dean Feldman for Leadership in Nursing Education

Monday, January 23 at 10:45 am, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) will honor Congresswoman Nita Lowey in her White Plains district office to recognize her outstanding leadership on behalf of nursing education and research.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact:
Cara Halstead Cea, Public Information, Pace University
914-773-3313 (Office), 914-906-9680 (Cell) chalstead@pace.edu

CONGRESSWOMAN NITA LOWEY TO BE HONORED MONDAY
FOR LEADERSHIP ON BEHALF OF NURSING EDUCATION AND RESEARCH

Editors’ note: Lowey will be available for questions and photos after the ceremony.

WHAT: Monday, January 23 at 10:45 am, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) will honor Congresswoman Nita Lowey in her White Plains district office to recognize her outstanding leadership on behalf of nursing education and research.

Also honored will be Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, Dean of the Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University in New York, who is receiving the “Grassroots Star” award from AACN for grassroots advocacy to solve the nationwide nursing and nursing faculty shortage.

WHEN: Monday, January 23 at 10:45am
WHERE: Lowey’s district office, 222 Mamaroneck Ave., Suite 310, White Plains, NY 10605, 914-428-1707

Potential issues for discussion
The latest developments in New York State regarding nursing education and the nursing shortage are expected to be discussed by Lowey and the nursing administrators and faculty members at the event is Part of this discussion will likely include the NEED Act, which is legislation that would help nursing schools nationwide expand their enrollments and resolve the national nursing shortage. (See attached file: Bill Summary.doc for more information on the NEED Act.) Lowey is on the Appropriations Subcommittee of Labor Health Human Services and Education and may be asked questions about funding for health and education programs next year.

Lowey also is interested in a variety of health and human services issues such as pandemic flu, food allergies, disaster preparedness, school safety, the environment, nuclear power, as well as the nursing shortage.
Lowey has worked to secure funding for nursing education, in New York State and nationwide, through her seat on the Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Subcommittee as well as through the introduction of the Nurse Education, Expansion, and Development (NEED) Act with colleagues Lois Capps and Peter King.
Presenting the award to Lowey on behalf of AACN will be Feldman and Glenda Kelman, Ph.D., Chair of the Department of Nursing at Sage College in Albany.
Set within culturally diverse urban and suburban settings, Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing (LSN) is committed to innovation and excellence in education, research, and practice in primary health care. With more than 600 students enrolled in baccalaureate and master’s degree programs, all approved by the New York State Education Department and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, LSN partners with communities to foster human growth and dignity and provide primary care. The School of Nursing is devoted to preparing individuals, families, and communities at local, national, and international levels, to meet health care demands now and in the future. For inquiries about the nursing programs at Pace, please email nursing@pace.edu, or call (914) 773-3552.
Founded in 1906, Pace University educates achievers who are engaged with critical issues both locally and globally. Known for its outcome-oriented environment that prepares students to succeed in a wide-range of professions, Pace has three campuses, including New York City (downtown and lower Manhattan), Westchester (Pleasantville, Briarcliff, and the White Plains Graduate Center), and the Pace School of Law in White Plains. The Pace Hudson Valley Center is located in Orange County New York. A private metropolitan university, Pace enrolls more than 14,000 students in undergraduate, masters, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Ivan G. Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, and School of Education. Visit Pace University at www.pace.edu.

Dean of Nursing Testifies in Washington on Nursing and Faculty Shortage

Today Harriet Feldman, Dean and Professor of the Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University, located in Westchester County and New York City, New York, addressed the U.S. House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services and Education on the nationwide shortage of registered nurses and the underlying shortage of nurse faculty.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Cara Halstead, Office of Public Information,
Pace University, 914-773-3312, Cell: 914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY’S DEAN OF NURSING ADDRESSES CONGRESS ON NATIONWIDE SHORTAGE OF REGISTERED NURSES

Testimony presented before the U.S. House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services and Education

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, April 21, 2005 – Today Harriet Feldman, Dean and Professor of the Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University, located in Westchester County and New York City, New York, addressed the U.S. House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services and Education on the nationwide shortage of registered nurses and the underlying shortage of nurse faculty.

Speaking on behalf of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), Feldman’s testimony echoed AACN’s recommendations for increased funding to existing nursing education programs. Budget increases for the Nursing Workforce Development Programs may also boost pre-doctoral, doctoral, and post-doctoral education for nurses nationwide. Feldman’s testimony also presented solutions to growing problems associated with the Nurse Education, Expansion, and Development Act (NEED Act), sponsored by Reps. Nita Lowey (D-NY) and Lois Capps (D-CA).
.
She noted that a bleak budget situation for health and education programs could lead to increased problems in the future. “Without a sufficient number of registered nurses, patient safety is compromised,” Feldman said.

Citing figures from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, Feldman said that the US will need an additional 1.1 million new and replacement registered nurses by 2012. “Nursing is the fastest growing occupation, yet according to the Health Resources and Services Administration our nation will still be roughly 800,000 nurses short in 2020 unless there is a significant and sustained increase in the number of nurses graduating each year and entering the workforce,” Feldman said.

“At Pace University our enrollments are higher than the national average,” Feldman continued. “For example, our fall 2004 enrollments were increased over the prior fall by 35%; this spring we enrolled 36% more students, 109 people, than we did in spring 2004. It is still not enough since some sources claim that we must increase enrollments by at least 40% annually to be effective.”

She explained that without enough qualified applicants for vacant faculty positions, it is impossible to accept additional students into nursing programs. “Compounding the shrinking pool of eligible faculty candidates is an aging nursing faculty, noncompetitive faculty salaries, and budget pressures within individual academic institutions,” Feldman said.

Statistics covered in Feldman’s testimony include:
• AACN reported that in fall 2004, almost 33,000 qualified applicants to nursing undergraduate and graduate programs were turned away, nearly double those of the prior fall. In the US there are approximately 1,500 schools of nursing, all working to expand enrollments, most without sufficient faculty to educate the growing numbers of students.
• AACN estimates that if the current faculty vacancy rate holds steady, the deficit of nurse faculty will swell to over 2,600 unfilled positions in 2012.

Possible solutions in Feldman’s testimony include:
• Budget increases. Feldman proposes a budget increase of $25 million for 2006 (bringing the total to $175 million) for the Nursing Workforce Development Programs.
• Additional funding for the Nurse Faculty Loan Program. The Nurse Faculty Loan Program provides grants to colleges of nursing to support full-time master’s and doctoral nursing students—future nurse faculty. Up to 85% of these students’ educational loans may be cancelled over a 4-year period if they agree to teach at a school of nursing. If funding doubles to almost $10 million, colleges of nursing could educate over 800 future faculty who could, in turn, educate over 8,000 future nurses each year.
• Approval of the NEED Act. The NEED Act is a capitation grant program for schools of nursing sponsored by Congresswoman Nita Lowey (D-NY) that would provide accredited schools of nursing with a fixed dollar amount for each enrolled student.

Feldman’s complete oral testimony is available on the AACN Web site at http://www.aacn.nche.edu/Government/Testimony/Feldman.htm.

For more information on AACN’s legislative strategies related to Nursing Workforce Development programs, see http://www.aacn.nche.edu/Government/Docs/TitleVIIIFY06.DOC.
Set within culturally diverse urban and suburban settings, Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing (LSN) is committed to innovation and excellence in education, research, and practice in primary health care. With more than 600 students enrolled in baccalaureate and master’s degree programs, all approved by the New York State Education Department and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, LSN partners with communities to foster human growth and dignity and provide primary care. The School of Nursing is devoted to preparing individuals, families, and communities at local, national, and international levels, to meet health care demands now and in the future.
A private university in the New York Metropolitan area, Pace has a growing national reputation for offering students opportunity, teaching and learning based on research, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. Pace has seven campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. Approximately 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. For inquiries about the nursing programs at Pace, email nursing@pace.edu, or call (914) 773-3552. www.pace.edu

Pace University Sponsors America’s Walk for Diabetes

Students from all Pace University campuses have joined the Pace team for the walk, under team captain Jill Rothman, nurse educator in the Primary Health Care Associates Department at Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing.

Contact: Jill Rothman, Lienhard School of Nursing, Pace University, 914-882-8918, jrothman@pace.edu or Bill Caldwell, Office of Public Information, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY

October 15, 2004

PACE UNIVERSITY SPONSORS AMERICA’S WALK FOR DIABETES
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, AT RYE PLAYLAND, RYE, NY

WHAT: America’s Walk for Diabetes, the American Diabetes Association’s signature special events fund-raising campaign. With strong support from the community including sponsorship and corporate teams, this event raises nearly $20 million to find a cure for diabetes and to support the association’s mission.

WHO: Students from all Pace University campuses have joined the Pace team for the walk, under team captain Jill Rothman, nurse educator in the Primary Health Care Associates Department at Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing. A large number of Pace supporters are proudly walking to help the American Diabetes Association fight against diabetes, a disease affecting over 18.2 million Americans. This year’s team has a strong and committed group of freshman students from Valley Dorm on Pace’s Briarcliff campus and from Alpha Lambda Sigma Sorority on the Pleasantville campus.

“It is so important for students to give back,” says Rothman. “Their dedication and strong commitment to support such a worthy cause teaches the importance of helping others. Each student volunteering their time and support is an inspiration to others.”

WHEN: Sunday, October 17, 10 a.m.

WHERE: Rye Playland, Rye, NY

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university committed to opportunity, teaching and learning, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. It is one of the ten founders of Project Pericles, developing education that encourages lifelong participation in democratic processes. Pace has seven campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and the law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. Approximately 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu

Lienhard School of Nursing Creates New Institute for Healthy Aging

The Lienhard School of Nursing of Pace University has recently established the Institute for Healthy Aging (IHA) on its New York and Pleasantville campuses. The Institute will provide education and research geared toward individuals 40 years of age and older and to Health Care Professionals and Allied Professionals servicing this population. Initial funding for the Institute was provided by grants from the Mary and Milton B. Rosenbach Foundation

NEW YORK – September 25, 2002 – The Lienhard School of Nursing of Pace University has recently established the Institute for Healthy Aging (IHA) on its New York and Pleasantville campuses. The Institute will provide education and research geared toward individuals 40 years of age and older and to Health Care Professionals and Allied Professionals servicing this population. Initial funding for the Institute was provided by grants from the Mary and Milton B. Rosenbach Foundation

“Since so many adults are now between 40-65 the time is ripe for a call to action for a proactive and strategic approach to the challenges of the aging,” said Joanne Singleton, co-director of the IHA at Pace University. “Healthy aging is the conscious intent and participation in the biological-psychological-sociological-spiritual care-of-self over time. Through multidisciplinary education and research the IHA will provide educational activities and develop programs for individuals, families and communities to promote healthy aging.”

The Institute for Healthy Aging (IHA) will host its first conference on Saturday, November 9, 2002 from 8:30 – 4:00 p.m. at Pace University’s New York City campus. Specialists in nutrition, sports science, neurobiology and aging will be featured throughout the day and will include, Walter Willett MD, chairman of the department of nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health and author of the best selling book, “Eat, Drink and Be Healthy”. Advance tickets are available for $99 when paid fourteen days prior to the conference otherwise the fee is $125.

For more information on the conference contact Joanne Singleton, jsingleton@pace.edu or (212) 346-1430 or visit conference site info at www.pace.edu/adult/ace