NURSE.com: Back to School – Tips on How to Return to the Classroom

Jane Dolan RN, MSN, did her part to dispel the myth that there isn’t much money available for graduate nursing students in a national cover story in Nursing Spectrum. “There is money out there and students should take advantage of it,” said Dolan, graduate clinical and recruitment coordinator at Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing in Pleasantville, N.Y.

Nursing Spectrum, published by Gannett Health Care group, ran a national cover story featuring Jane Dolan RN, MSN, Graduate Clinical and Recruitment Coordinator in the College of Health Professions. Dolan provides tips on paying for school for graduate nursing students.

From the story:

Going back to school can be good not only for an RN’s career, experts say, but also for the profession and the country.

As part of a 2010 report, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Initiative on the Future of Nursing, in partnership with the Institute of Medicine, called for improvements to nursing education and for RNs to climb the educational ladder. That conclusion stemmed from evaluations of the public’s needs, healthcare’s complexity, systemic gaps and the importance of nurses having educational parity with their peers, said Michael Bleich, RN, PhD, FAAN, a member of the Future of Nursing committee.

Although it may be a national imperative, pursuing an advanced degree is about personal and professional growth and “creating a set of experiences to enliven the cognitive capacity of a person, the spiritual and human dimensions of caring,” said Bleich, a professor and former dean at the Oregon Health & Science University School of Nursing in Portland. “Nursing is a discipline that is robust and expansive,” he said. “This isn’t for the faint of heart.”

Likewise, going back to school isn’t for the timid. Many returning students, who found becoming an RN hard enough, now have to factor in growing family and professional obligations.

Consider Christi Reeves, RN, BSN, who completed an online RN-to-BSN program at the University of Texas at Arlington. She was married and pregnant with her third child while completing the program. Her new degree already has yielded clear rewards.

“I had a lot of clinical experience after I did the ADN,” Reeves said, “but the BSN has helped me understand the whole picture of the patient.” It also helped her land a job as trauma program manager at Clear Lake Regional Medical Center in Webster, Texas, a larger facility than her previous one.

Reeves and educators who survived their own graduate education experiences offer their advice on going back to school.

CHOOSING A PROGRAM

According to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, more than 170 U.S. educational programs are available to allow RNs to progress from a diploma or associate’s degree to a master’s degree, and more than 600 RN-to-BSN programs are offered. A majority of those programs include at least some online component.

Here are some key considerations in choosing a program:

Do your homework.Talk to colleagues about BSN programs they’ve completed, Reeves advised. Her colleagues didn’t seem to like their online programs, in part because they were difficult to navigate. But when UTA came to her hospital, she had a chance to evaluate the program and log on to explore more.

Bleich advised asking others who have been through a program about its difficulty, the quality of its professors, whether assignments were relevant and engaging and whether the program fostered personal growth.

Weigh online versus traditional options. Online programs are popular. For example, UTA’s enrollment for this spring’s online RN-to-BSN program reached 4,000. “If you know you like to have face-to-face contact, online may not be good for you,” said Ceil Flores, RN, MSN, CNE, student success coordinator at UTA’s College of Nursing. But online learners have a lot of scheduling flexibility and can pursue programs that might not be available locally.

Get the facts. Ask about a nursing program’s accreditation, clinical rotation opportunities and graduation rate. Be sure to learn admission requirements, such as whether Graduate Record Examination scores are required. And ask what students are expected to be able to achieve after completing the program, Flores advised.

PAYING FOR SCHOOL

Jane Dolan RN, MSN, would like to dispel the myth that there isn’t much money available for graduate nursing students. “There is money out there and students should take advantage of it,” said Dolan, graduate clinical and recruitment coordinator at Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing in Pleasantville, N.Y.

At Pace, Dolan said, the first stops are the graduate admissions office to review eligibility for merit scholarships and the financial aid office for information about loans or other assistance. A separate office is dedicated to helping RNs track down additional funding opportunities.

Read the rest of the article at NURSE.com.

Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing Wins Third Grant for Scholarships to Increase Nursing Diversity

Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing will again award scholarships to students from groups traditionally underrepresented in nursing, including men and people from disadvantaged backgrounds, thanks to a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN).

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:

Cara Cea, ccea@pace.edu; 914-906-9680

Sharon Lewis, slewis2@pace.edu; 914-773-3973

Posted in partnership with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing.

Scholarships funded through the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and American Association of Colleges of Nursing to go to students underrepresented in the profession

NEW YORK, NY, July30, 2010 – Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing will again award scholarships to students from groups traditionally underrepresented in nursing, including men and people from disadvantaged backgrounds, thanks to a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN).

Eight scholarships of $10,000 each will be awarded to students entering Lienhard’s accelerated Combined Degree Program (CDP)during the 2010-2011 academic year. This is Lienhard’s second award in three rounds of funding, which comes through the foundation’s RWJF New Careers in Nursing (NCIN) scholarship program.

The program was launched in 2008 to address the national nursing shortage and fuel the pipeline of diverse nursing faculty members, developing culturally competent health professionals and future leaders of the profession.

Pace University was among the first institutions in the nation to receive funding through the RWJF New Careers in Nursing Scholarship Programin 2008; the programhas already supported 12 Lienhard students.One of them, John Ringhisen, was recently awarded a Fulbright scholarship to conduct research on access to health care in Bangladesh.

“We are challenging the nation’s nursing schools to be innovative and resourceful in how they grow their nursing programs, diversify student populations and contribute to the nursing leadership of tomorrow,” said Denise A. Davis, Dr. P.H., the RWJFprogram officer for NCIN. “We are very pleased to support this unique approach, particularly at a time when growing numbers of Americans are gaining insurance and entering our health care system.”

Pace’s Combined Degree Program is an accelerated curriculum for college graduates who are not nurses and want to study nursing in a program that leads to a first professional nursing degree (the BS in nursing),combinedwith the optionof an advanced professional degree (the MS). Lienhard has long been a leader in education leading to second degrees for non-nursing college graduates and has offered the CDP since 1984. The school is known for preparing culturally competent leaders.

The NCIN program was created through RWJF and AACN to help enable schools of nursing expand their student capacity in accelerated baccalaureate and master’s programs. At the same time it aims to build a more diverse workforce to serve the needs of a changing population of patients. Schools receiving NCIN grantsprovide scholarships directly to students from groups underrepresented in nursing or from disadvantaged backgrounds. In its second year, 58 percent of scholarships went to students from diverse racial and ethnic groups and 37 percent went to men, who currently account for only 6.6 percent of the nation’s nurses.

Of the 63 institutions receiving funding, Pace is one of six in New York.In the 2010 – 2011 academic year, a total of 397 students in accelerated baccalaureate programs and 114 students in accelerated master’s programs will receive NICN scholarship funding.

The NCIN program addresses a number of challenges confronting nursing education, professional development for nurses, and the national nursing shortage. Accelerated programs like the ones supported by NCIN provide scholars with the most efficient route to licensure as registered nurses (RNs). They also create nursing opportunities for adults who have already completed a baccalaureate or graduate degree in another field. The programs prepare students to pass the licensure exam required for RNs in as little as 12-18 months, a quicker route to workforce eligibility than traditional programs.

By bringing more nurses into the profession at the baccalaureate and master’s levels, the NCIN program also helps to address the nation’s continuing shortage of nursing faculty members. Data from the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration show that nurses entering the profession via baccalaureate programs are four times more likely than other nurses to pursue a graduate degree in nursing. This trend is reflected in the NCIN scholars, as 95% of the students receiving funding in the first two years of the program indicate a desire to advance their education to the master’s and doctoral levels.

The RWJF New Careers in Nursing Scholarship Program is clearly having a positive effect on the nation’s nursing schools. Many programs that received awards have used the NCIN funding to help leverage additional resources to add new faculty members, secure matching funding from state programs, develop mentoring and leadership development programs, strengthen outreach efforts, and establish new partnerships with community and practice leaders.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation focuses on the pressing health and health care issues facing our country.  As the nation’s largest philanthropy devoted exclusively to improving the health and health care of all Americans, the Foundation works with a diverse group of organizations and individuals to identify solutions and achieve comprehensive, meaningful, and timely change. For more than 35 years the Foundation has brought experience, commitment, and a rigorous, balanced approach to the problems that affect the health and health care of those it serves.Helping Americans lead healthier lives and get the care they need,the Foundation expects to make a difference in our lifetime.www.rwjf.org

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) is the national voice for university and four-year college education programs in nursing. Representing more than 640 member schools of nursing at public and private institutions nationwide, AACN’s educational, research, governmental advocacy, data collection, publications, and other programs work to establish quality standards for bachelor’s- and graduate-degree nursing education, assist deans and directors to implement those standards, influence the nursing profession to improve health care, and promote public support of baccalaureate and graduate nursing education, research, and practice. www.aacn.nche.edu

About the Lienhard School of Nursing: Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing has nearly doubled in size over the last five years, and now has more than 800 students enrolled in baccalaureate and master’s degree programs, all approved by the New York State Education Department and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. With classrooms and laboratories in culturally diverse urban and suburban settings, the school is committed to innovation and excellence in education, research, and practice in primary health care. Lienhard partners with communities to foster human growth and dignity and provide primary care, and prepares individuals, families, and communities at local, national, and international levels to meet health care demands now and in the future.

About Pace: For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Philip Greiner Named Associate Dean for Faculty Development in Scholarship and Teaching at Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing

Philip A. Greiner, DNSc, RN, has been named Associate Dean for Faculty Development in Scholarship and Teaching at Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing, starting this month. Greiner’s areas of expertise include electronic health records use with simulation, public health nursing and aging.

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, July 21, 2010 –Philip A. Greiner, DNSc, RN, has been named Associate Dean for Faculty Development in Scholarship and Teaching at Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing, starting this month. Greiner’s areas of expertise include electronic health records use with simulation, public health nursing and aging.

Greiner is expected to intensify Lienhard’s initiatives in preparing nurses for a field that is more driven by scholarship than ever before and in addressing President Obama’s call for computerization of the nation’s health care records within four years.

Greiner currently is Secretary of the Connecticut Public Health Association and a Board member for Southwest Community Health Center in Bridgeport, CT. At the Fairfield University School of Nursing, he served most recently as Associate Dean for Public Health and Entrepreneurial Initiatives, Associate Professor, and Director of the Health Promotion Center, a nurse-managed wellness center. Before that, he directed the school’s undergraduate program and was an assistant professor.

According to Lienhard School of Nursing Dean and Professor Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, “With nursing education evolving to prepare nurses for the needs of a changing and aging population and requiring a greater emphasis on research and other forms of scholarship, Dr. Greiner’s administrative experience, educational background and research focus will add extra depth and dimension to Lienhard’s offerings.” Feldman edited one of the first books on teaching evidence-based practice, an area in which Lienhard specializes.

Technology and nursing

Changes in how nurses are taught have been necessary to keep pace with evolving population demographics and developments like the nursing informatics technology boom, according to a recent Nursing Spectrum article that quotes Lienhard faculty members Rona F. Levin, RN, PhD and Martha J. Greenberg, RN, PhD.

Greiner said: “With nursing more focused on using the latest technology and applying scientific results, my goal is to help build on Lienhard’s strengths in these areas and expand opportunities for faculty members to grow in their scholarship and teaching roles.”

Lienhard created his position as part of an enhanced commitment to teaching and learning with research and scholarship. Attracted to Pace’s 44 year record of preparing nurses to meet the needs of diverse and aging populations, Greiner sees areas of opportunity in expanding on existing faculty research in gerontology, cardiology, smoking cessation and nursing informatics. 

Homeless health care

Greiner’s career in public health began when he graduated from a 5-year cooperative program in nursing at Albright College and The Reading Hospital School of Nursing in Reading, PA. He earned a BSN and MSN in Community Health Nursing, and a DNSc at the University of Pennsylvania. Greiner completed two post-doctoral studies at the University of Kentucky, the first in homeless health care through the College of Nursing and the second in epidemiology and aging through the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging. He also completed the John A. Hartford Foundation/NYU Hartford Institute Gerontological Research Scholar program at New York University and the International Center for Health Leadership Development Fellows program at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Greiner is a past-chair of the American Public Health Association’s Public Health Nursing Section and more recently served on the American Nurses Association’s Task Force on the Scope and Standards for Public Health Nursing Practice. He previously held faculty positions at the University of Pennsylvania, Villanova University, and the University of Pittsburgh.

Greiner is a Fellow of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), the national voice for nursing education programs. Dr. Greiner is participating in the 2010American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Leadership for Academic Nursing program. He is also on the AACN faculty development subcommittee, and as of November, he will be chair of the AACN organizational leadership network. AACN is the national voice for baccalaureate and higher degree programs in nursing education.

About The Lienhard School of Nursing: In response to the nationwide shortage of nurses, the Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University increased its enrollment in 2009-2010 by about 70 students, the fourth year with such an increase. In recent years it has won over $5 million in federal and private grants. Lienhard’s Family Nurse Practitioner program is ranked ninth nationally in the U.S. News & World Report survey of America’s Best Graduate Schools; last year the school added a doctoral program. Harriet R. Feldman, Ph.D., the dean, is a nurse who has emerged as a national authority on three major trends that are changing the nursing profession – the shortage of nurses and nurse educators, the involvement of nurses in promoting health policy, and the promotion of evidence-based procedures in nursing education and practice. With a Ph.D. in nursing science from New York University, she has published more than 90 books, chapters and articles and testified before Congress. In the national discussion of health care reform, she is a strong advocate of using nurse practitioners to meet the increasing need for expanding primary care delivery to focus on health promotion and maintenance and the management of chronic illness.

About Pace University: For more than 100 years, Pace University has been preparing students to become leaders in their fields. A private university, Pace provides an education that combines exceptional academics with professional experience and the New York advantage. Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and enrolls almost 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Lienhard School of Nursing Dean Harriet R. Feldman Appointed Interim Provost of Pace University

Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman announced that Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, dean and tenured professor of Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing since 1993, will assume the role of interim provost, effective August 1.

A collaborative leader and renowned expert in the field of nursing education, Feldman has testified before Congress, been honored for her grassroots political advocacy and written over 100 books, scholarly articles and editorials. A sought after speaker on health care and leadership, Feldman has presented at conferences worldwide.

NEW YORK, NY, July 6, 2010 – Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman has announced that Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, dean and tenured professor of Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing since 1993 who also served concurrently as interim dean of Pace’s School of Education (2006-10), will assume the role of interim provost, effective August 1.

“Harriet has been an invaluable member of this university, and we are grateful that she is willing to take on this responsibility until a permanent successor can be found,” said Friedman. “I know that with Harriet’s sure-handed guidance, the academic leadership is in place now to begin to make our new strategic plan’s vision – for Pace University to be considered among the very best at its mission – a reality.”

Feldman succeeds Dr. Geoffrey L. Brackett, who will be leaving Pace after 20 years (the last three as provost) to become executive vice president at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, New York.

Friedman paid tribute to Brackett, saying: “Geoff will be missed. He has helped start us down a path that has led to some important new directions for the University. He has overseen academic renewal across several schools and the college and the hiring of dozens of new faculty, and has brought focus and discipline to the office of the provost through difficult times. He initiated several signature programs that have heightened national recognition for Pace.”  

“This is an exciting time at Pace,” Feldman said. “Just this past week we announced the addition of two exceptionally qualified new deans, Neil Braun for the Lubin School of Business and Andrea Spencer for the School of Education, along with Sheying Chen as the new associate provost. This past year we launched the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies and formed a partnership with Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre. We had five Fulbright finalists and a winner from Lienhard. There is a great deal of momentum at Pace and I look forward to working with the president, deans, faculty, and staff to keep us moving in the right direction.”

Innovator, Researcher, Practitioner and Rainmaker

Feldman has testified in Congress and written numerous articles and letters to editors on nursing policy, becoming a nationally known figure both within her field and in the media. For her legislative work in addressing the nursing and nursing faculty shortage, she received the “STAR” award for grassroots political advocacy from the Association of American Colleges of Nursing.

She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and a Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine, and past editor of the journals Nursing Leadership Forum and Scholarly Inquiry for Nursing Practice.

In the past decade, Feldman has edited or authored four award-winning books. Nurses in the Political Arena: The Public Face of Nursing (2000), with Sandra Lewenson, EdD, RN, FAAN, received an American Journal of Nursing (AJN) Book of the Year Award and a Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Print Media Award. That was soon followed by The Nursing Shortage: Strategies for Recruitment and Retention in Clinical Practice and Education (2003), Educating Nurses for Leadership (2005, with Martha J. Greenberg, PhD, RN), and Teaching Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing (2006, with Rona F. Levin, PhD, RN), all three of which also received AJN Book of the Year Awards.

Lienhard holds the distinction of being among the first institutions in the nation to receive funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) through the RWJF New Careers in Nursing Scholarship Program. Grants provided through this program are being used to increase the number of students enrolled in Lienhard’s accelerated baccalaureate nursing program, the Combined Degree Program (CDP).

In 2006, Feldman was principal author of both a $1.3 million Helene Fuld Health Trust grant to support career-change Bachelor of Science nursing students and a one-year residency program, in partnership with Health and Hospitals Corporation, and a $500,000 Helene Fuld Health Trust scholarship endowment. Also under her direction, in 2005, Lienhard led a consortium of health-related institutions in New York’s Hudson Valley that won a $1.03 million U.S. Labor Department grant. The funds provide monetary credits to healthcare facilities in exchange for loaning Master’s-prepared nurses to teach clinical courses, thereby making it possible to enroll greater numbers of nursing students.  

Feldman’s extensive professional memberships include the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (Board Member: 2003 to 2010); NY/NJ Nursing Spectrum Advisory Board (Board Member, 2002 – Present); Greater New York Organization of Nurse Executives (2001 to Present); and the Eastern Nursing Research Society (1991 to Present).

Prior to joining Pace, Feldman was Chair and Professor of the Department of Nursing at Fairleigh Dickinson University. She started her teaching career at the State University of New York at Farmingdale and taught at Adelphi University. Her clinical appointments have included: Long Island College Hospital, North Shore Visiting Nurse Service, and Long Island Jewish Medical Center.

Feldman received her BS and MS degrees in nursing from Adelphi University and her PhD in nursing science from New York University.  She and her husband live in Bellmore, New York.

A national search for a permanent provost will begin in the Fall, with a candidate to be announced in Spring 2011.  

On June 27, Pace announced three new additions to its academic leadership team effective July 1. Neil Braun, former president of NBC Television Network and CEO of Viacom Entertainment, and current CEO of The CarbonNeutral Company, is the new dean of the Lubin School of Business. Andrea (Penny) M. Spencer, PhD, the new dean of the School of Education, joined from Bank Street College where she was the associate dean for academic affairs. Sheying Chen, PhD, is the new associate provost, previously associate vice chancellor for academic affairs at Indiana University, Southeast.

About Pace University: For more than 100 years, Pace University has been preparing students to become leaders in their fields. A private university, Pace provides an education that combines exceptional academics with professional experience and the New York advantage. Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and enrolls almost 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Lienhard School of Nursing “Admits” Harvey, A Lifelike Cardiovascular Simulator

Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing now has a permanent patient on staff. The school is the recipient of “Harvey,” a cardiopulmonary patient simulator, thanks to an $87,500 grant from the Hugoton Foundation.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:

Cara Cea, (914) 906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

LIENHARD SCHOOL OF NURSING “ADMITS” HARVEY, A LIFELIKE CARDIOVASCULAR SIMULATOR

NEW YORK, NY, May 14, 2010 – Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing now has a permanent patient on staff. The school is the recipient of “Harvey,” a cardiopulmonary patient simulator, thanks to an $87,500 grant from the Hugoton Foundation.

He’s not human, but Harvey is no dummy. He simulates 30 cardiac diseases with realistic heart and lung sounds at the touch of a button. He can be programmed to have various conditions that students diagnose and treat, such as hypertension, angina, myocardial infarct (“heart attack”), mitral valve prolapse, or a ventricular septal defect (“a hole in the heart”).

Harvey allows Pace University nursing students to practice their bedside diagnostic skills as often as they wish on him – and build confidence along the way. Increasingly nursing schools are turning to patient simulators to train students so they can practice on mannequins without fear of making fatal mistakes. The American College of Cardiology Task Force on Teaching recommends Harvey for training.

Although Harvey turned 42 this year, he is better than ever. The first Harvey simulators were heavy, weighing over 700 pounds. With his countless health issues he has helped train thousands of health care professionals at over 140 medical centers worldwide. With the trend toward shorter hospital stays, nursing students benefit from the continual presence of a patient who tolerates constant treatment and prodding.

The new slim, trim Harvey, weighing just 90 pounds, has undergone quite a few changes since he came on the scene in 1968. Harvey used to have a system of cams and levers that drove pistons to simulate his heartbeat and pulse. Today digital technology regulates Harvey’s heartbeat and pulse. With the addition of abnormal breath sounds, Harvey can now simulate a variety of pulmonary diseases. The newer Harvey also simulates additional cardiac disease states, has the ability to speak, and an interactive link to a multimedia computer curriculum in cardiology. The creators believe that Harvey will do for lung disease simulation what he already did for cardiac disease training.

According to dean and professor Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, “Harvey’s computer controlled simulation allows our advanced practice and entry-level nursing students to learn, practice and repeat procedures before performing them on real patients. Our students will get evidence-based learning experiences that are deeply meaningful while at the same time realistic and safe.”

Feldman noted that technology has transformed nursing education at Lienhard over the years and that Harvey will be in good company with a growing Lienhard family of several other patient simulators at Pace, along with equipment commonly found in a critical care unit or Emergency Room (ER): patient monitor, respirator, 12 lead EKG machine, multi-line IV pumps and a crash cart complete with defibrillator. Pace’s “Vital Sim” simulators have heart and lung sounds, blood pressure, arterial oxygenation levels, and even cough and groan like a real patient. This makes for a highly realistic “patient encounter” in the safe environment of the Learning Resource Center. “We are hoping to continue expansion of simulation learning as the field, and our student population, have grown,” Feldman said.

Professor Joanne Singleton, PhD, will work with aspiring family nurse practitioners to help them hone their skills on Harvey. She said, “Harvey is truly a lifesaver; he will help the nurses of tomorrow learn or improve skills and effective teamwork behaviors that will prevent health care errors that compromise patient safety. Mistakes can be made safely on Harvey that will help students learn without any negative outcomes on real people. Students who work with Harvey can learn at their own pace and be less likely to make health care errors when it counts – in a real-life situation.”

Assistant Professor Lucille Ferrara, EdD, will use Harvey for a pilot study in fall 2010 with nurse practitioner students to compare teaching methods. The study will examine high-fidelity simulation-based assessment, delivered via Harvey, versus more traditional teaching tools such as case studies. Both student and teacher perspectives will be explored. The results of this study will be critical as faculty in the family nurse practitioner program plan to transition from teaching with case studies to teaching in a more hands-on way with high fidelity (Harvey) simulation-based clinical skills assessment.

About Pace University: For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

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Fulbright Winner Aims to Remove Barriers to Quality Healthcare in Bangladesh

With much debate regarding healthcare systems worldwide, John J. Ringhisen, RN, a graduate of Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing, will study cultural and social barriers that prevent access to primary health care as a recipient of a 2010-2011 Fulbright Research Grant to South and Central Asia, Bangladesh.

PACE UNIVERSITY FULBRIGHT WINNER AIMS TO REMOVE BARRIERS TO QUALITY HEALTHCARE IN BANGLADESH

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contacts: Cara Cea, 914-773-3312 or ccea@pace.edu;
Sharon Lewis, 914-773-3973 or slewis2@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY FULBRIGHT WINNER AIMS TO REMOVE BARRIERS TO QUALITY HEALTHCARE IN BANGLADESH

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, April 28, 2010 – With much debate regarding healthcare systems worldwide, John J. Ringhisen, RN, a graduate of Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing, will study cultural and social barriers that prevent access to primary health care as a recipient of a 2010-2011 Fulbright Research Grant to South and Central Asia, Bangladesh.

Ringhisen will volunteer his services in Dhaka, Bangladesh for nine months beginning in August, as a registered nurse/participant observer in local primary health care centers and the communities they serve. In this role, Ringhisen will interview community and public health officials to collect their opinions on what prevents their target groups from participating.

Ringhisen hopes to bring back some important lessons that can be applied to our healthcare system in the U.S. “Accessibility to healthcare is critical. More attention needs to be paid to rural and isolated populations. Instead of a healthcare clinic spending money on new equipment, perhaps door-to-door van service can be provided so families without any means of transportation can get the medical attention they need. I would advocate securing a grant to provide a ‘clinic on wheels’ that would come into the rural communities to help with basic healthcare needs such as vaccinations and wellness exams to avoid the potentially long travel time to healthcare facilities. There are existing programs that focus on specialties such as Outreach Mobile Eye Clinics (OMEC) out of Australia. Even more important, however, is to create a system of hard site clinics as logistical support hubs so that these mobile clinics can stay in the field longer, probe deeper into remote areas, and offer more emergent care if needed.”

The Wichita, KS native graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1999 with a bachelor of science degree in physics and minor in electrical engineering. Upon graduation, he received a commission as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army’s Finance Corps. John served in Seoul, South Korea and supported operations in Bosnia, Kosovo, and Iraq until his honorable discharge in 2003.

After working as an office manager and comptroller for several small businesses and a private dental practice, John realized his future in healthcare through Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing Combined Degree Program (CDP). In 2008 John was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation New Careers in Nursing Scholar. He graduated in December 2009 with a bachelor of science degree in Nursing and received his New York State Registered Professional Nursing License in March 2010.

Ringhisen interacted with patients from diverse backgrounds while working in the emergency room at Westchester Medical Center and with the Visiting Nurse Association of the Hudson Valley.

“John tells us he was inspired by the classes he took in the CDP, particularly those that focused on cultural competency in nursing,” said Lienhard dean Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN. “He was able to apply what he was learning about cultural competence in the classroom in a hands-on, practical way and wondered how other countries fared with their healthcare systems, especially those in the developing world.“

Ringhisen is learning Bengali and Hindi in preparation for his departure to Bangladesh. He also speaks intermediate Spanish and Arabic, and beginner Hangul (Korean).

Martha Greenberg, PhD, R.N., Associate Professor and Chairperson Undergraduate Nursing Studies, said, “From the first day of meeting him, John stood out as a leader among this peers. John is a decorated Veteran of the United States military. He is articulate, well read, a nursing scholar, kind and compassionate to his peers and colleagues, and a leader. He has a proven track record of adapting to different cultural environments having served in Iraq. Finally, he is committed to working with underserved people to improve their health and be a change agent not only abroad but locally, nationally and globally.”

According to Dr. Lillie M. Shortridge-Baggett, EdD, RN, FAAN “John is Lienhard School of Nursing’s second Fulbright scholar; our first is Patty Sayre, and both are exceptional students. We are very proud of their success.”

Ringhisen is married to the former Melissa Grider of Lombard, IL, a Major and a full time professor and scholarship advisor with the Department of Social Sciences at West Point. Ringhisen says, “She has two Rhodes Scholars, one East-West, two Truman Scholars, nine Rotary, and two National Science Foundation Scholars to mentor and assist with their own overseas studies. The joke in the house right now is whether or not she gets to ‘claim’ me as her one Fulbright Scholar since she helped with my application process.” The couple has two sons, John Patrick age 7 and Trevor Alfred age 3. While Ringhisen is in Bangladesh, his family will remain in the U.S., staying at West Point with an extensive support system.

About the Fulbright Program: The Fulbright program is the flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the United States government and is designed to increase mutual understanding between the people of the US and the people of other countries. The Fulbright program provides participants – chosen for their academic merit and leadership potential – with the opportunity to study, teach and conduct research, exchange ideas and contribute to finding solutions to shared international concerns.

About Pace University: For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Future Nurses from Pace University Lobby Policymakers on Healthcare Issues

Nurses often speak out on behalf of their patients to ensure they get the best possible care, improving the lives of many people, one at a time. But nurses are also a powerful group when they get together to advocate on the local and national level to improve the healthcare system for all of us.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts: Cara Cea, 914-773-3312 or ccea@pace.edu; Sharon Lewis, 914-773-3973 or slewis2@pace.edu

FUTURE NURSES FROM PACE UNIVERSITY LOBBY POLICYMAKERS ON HEALTHCARE ISSUES

Urge State Legislature to support nursing education, safe staffing ratios, punish violence against nurses, and require safe patient handling policies. Photos available upon request.

Albany, New York, April 21, 2010 — Nurses often speak out on behalf of their patients to ensure they get the best possible care, improving the lives of many people, one at a time. But nurses are also a powerful group when they get together to advocate on the local and national level to improve the healthcare system for all of us.

That was an important lesson that senior Amanda Schultz, along with about 50 other students from Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing, learned yesterday, when they attended the New York State Nurses Association‘s (NYSNA) annual Lobby Day at the State Capitol in Albany, taking part in public policy discussions with legislators and their aides. Lienhard students had the opportunity to meet with Assembly Members Robert Castelli and Deborah Glick, and aides for Assembly Member Jonathan Bing, Senators Andrea Stewart-Cousins, Suzi Oppenheimer, and Daniel Squadron.

The students talked with their legislators about a range of issues, from violence against nurses to safe staffing ratios to funding for nursing education programs. Schultz was particularly concerned about the issue of safety in the workplace. She said, “Statistics are stunning. According to the Department of Justice, nearly 500,000 nurses per year are victims of violent crimes in the workplace. When I am a full time nurse next year, the last thing I want to have to deal with is a violent patient. The proper protections need to be in place to keep nurses safe.”

NYSNA has written a memo of support for a bill that would add attacks on RNs or LPNs to the same class of assault as attacks on police officers, firefighters, and EMTs. The memo says that the frequency with which nurses are assaulted has led to an accepted and inappropriate belief that violence is to be expected in a healthcare environment and should be considered “part of the job.”

Lienhard School of Nursing students were accompanied to Albany by two of their faculty — Assistant Professor Andrea Sonenberg, NP, CNM, DNSc, and Clinical Instructor Ann Marie Bova, MSN, RN.

In addition to addressing violence against nurses, the students and their faculty are also advocating for safe staffing ratios, which result in safer care with improved patient outcomes, an improved workplace environment that will attract and retain nurses, and higher job satisfaction for nurses.

“I support the Safe Staffing for Quality Care Act,” said Sonenberg, who has been practicing for 24 years. “In my experience, an appropriate staff assignment, taking into account not just number of patients but acuity as well, results in better patient outcomes and satisfaction. Additionally, nurse satisfaction and retention are more likely to be optimal. If we don’t address this issue, the nursing shortage will only become more acute and a risk to patient safety.”

Nurses and future nurses are also advocating on measures affecting education of nurses. Proposed legislation would require registered professional nurses to attain bachelor’s degrees in nursing within ten years of their initial licensure. The legislation is modeled after an education requirement for public school teachers in New York State to earn a master’s within five years of initial certification. Bachelor’s degree programs provide additional emphasis on key areas of nursing theory and the use of evidence-based practice in nursing, according to NYSNA. Furthermore, BSN students are exposed to settings and areas of practice that are not generally part of associate degree programs, such as public health, home care, and various outpatient settings. The BSN curriculum also provides students with leadership skills that help them supervise and monitor dependent practitioners. According to Dean and Professor Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, “Nurses are lifelong learners, and every nurse should have a bachelor’s degree at a minimum. Although an associate degree provides a beginning foundation for practice, the evidence supports that there are fewer patient errors in health care environments that have a predominance of BS nurses, and patient safety is a high priority in patient care.”

According to Raymond Ng, president of Student Nurses at Pace (SNAP) on the New York City campus of Pace University, “Lobby Day really opened my eyes to how nurses can influence policy to improve care. I feel so empowered and energized from this experience; we talked to our policymakers, and they really listened.”

This Lobby Day event was organized by NYSNA, and approximately 2,200 nurses and future nurses attended. Professor Sonenberg said, “Advocacy is a critical process when it comes to improving our health care system, and as both current and future nurses, we are uniquely positioned to inform legislators on critical issues affecting the nation’s health and have a professional responsibility to make our voices heard.” Bova agreed saying, “This is an excellent learning experience for both the legislators and the students, and the result will be a more educated electorate and healthcare improvements.”

About Pace University: For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Lienhard Spring Scholarly Colloquium Part of Grassroots Movement to Make 2010 Year of the Nurse

Noted international nurse historian, Patricia D’Antonio, Ph.D., Associate Professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, will speak at Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing spring scholarly colloquium on Monday, March 8 in Pleasantville, NY. The colloquium is part of a grassroots international movement that has declared 2010 the Year of the Nurse to raise awareness of the critical role nurses play and to commemorate the 100th anniversary of famed nurse Florence Nightingale’s death.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact:

Sharon Lewis, Lienhard School of Nursing, (914) 773-3973, slewis2@pace.edu

Cara Cea, (914) 906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

SCHOLARLY COLLOQUIUM RECOGNIZES FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE AS FOUNDER OF MODERN NURSING

Noted nurse historian Patricia D’Antonio to keynote

Part of grassroots movement to make 2010 the Year of the Nurse

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, March 5, 2010 – Noted international nurse historian, Patricia D’Antonio, Ph.D., Associate Professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, will speak at Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing spring scholarly colloquium on Monday, March 8 in Pleasantville, NY. The colloquium is part of a grassroots international movement that has declared 2010 the Year of the Nurse to raise awareness of the critical role nurses play and to commemorate the 100th anniversary of famed nurse Florence Nightingale’s death.

The event will take place from 11:30am – 2:30pm in the Butcher Suite in the Kessel Student Center, entrance 3, 861 Bedford Rd.

D’Antonio’s talk, “Florence Nightingale: Myth and Meaning” is based on her latest book titled, “American Nursing: A History of Knowledge, Authority and the Meaning of Work.” According to Lienhard professor Sandra B. Lewenson, Ed.D., RN, FAAN, the event will “raise questions about nursing’s invisibility and nursing’s historical role in health care reform efforts. As the current debate over health care reform makes daily headlines, it is important to remember that Nightingale was a major reformer. There is this image of her, a myth really, of ‘the lady with the lamp’ — the reality is that Nightingale was a reformer who made major changes; she was the founder of the modern nursing movement.”

For more information, or to RSVP, please contact Sharon Lewis slewis2@pace.edu or Cara Cea at ccea@pace.edu.

About Lienhard: The Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University increased its enrollment in 2009-2010 by about 70 students, the fourth year with such an increase. In recent years it has won over $5 million in federal and private grants. Lienhard’s Family Nurse Practitioner program is ranked ninth nationally in the U.S. News & World Report survey of America’s Best Graduate Schools; last year the school added a doctoral program. Harriet R. Feldman, Ph.D., the dean, is a nurse who has emerged as a national authority on three major trends that are changing the nursing profession – the shortage of nurses and nurse educators, the involvement of nurses in promoting health policy, and the promotion of evidence-based procedures in nursing education and practice. With a Ph.D. in nursing science from New York University, she has published more than 90 books, chapters and articles and testified before Congress. In the national discussion of health care reform, she is a strong advocate of using nurse practitioners to meet the increasing need for expanding primary care delivery to focus on health promotion and maintenance and the management of chronic illness.

About Pace University: For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

State of the Union, State of the Stimulus – Pace Offers Case Studies

Pace University today announced that to date it has received eight federal stimulus awards totaling $1.8 million to fund research and community projects at its schools of computing, education, nursing, and law. Pace has submitted 32 stimulus proposals, of which we have received eight to date. The eight awards are:

Efficient energy for the environment. An enlarged Northeast Clean Energy Application Center to promote co-generation and other high efficiency, low emission power systems will be the result of the largest grant. The Pace Energy and Climate Center at Pace Law School will share $952,000 from the U.S. Department of Energy with the Center for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy at the University of Massachusetts.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts: Pace Public Information: Bill Caldwell, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu, or Chris Cory, 212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

PACE UNIVERSITY WINS $1.8 MILLION IN STIMULUS FUNDING

Projects involve

• green energy for the Northeast US,

• help for NYC’s Chinatown,

• new teaching methods

• mentoring for urban service careers

• nursing scholarships for disadvantaged students

• a NYC entrepreneurship website

New York, NY, January 27, 2010 –– Pace University today announced that to date it has received eight federal stimulus awards totaling $1.8 million to fund research and community projects at its schools of computing, education, nursing, and law. Pace has submitted 32 stimulus proposals, of which we have received eight to date. The eight awards are:

Efficient energy for the environment. An enlarged Northeast Clean Energy Application Center to promote co-generation and other high efficiency, low emission power systems will be the result of the largest grant. The Pace Energy and Climate Center at Pace Law School will share $952,000 from the U.S. Department of Energy with the Center for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy at the University of Massachusetts.

The Northeast region has significant potential for supplying alternative clean energy technologies like combined heat and power generation (“cogeneration”), waste heat recovery systems, and district energy systems. Besides environmental benefits, using less energy and other efficiencies will reduce the dollars flowing out of the region to pay for energy. The center serves New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine.

The clean energy center also received $55,027 from the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) to help with a 2009 conference that identified market based strategies to achieve energy conservation and a cleaner environment.

The Principal Investigator is Thomas G. Bourgeois, the deputy director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center, tbourgeois@law.pace.edu.

Relief to NYC Downtown and, Chinatown. Pace’s Community and Volunteer Mobilization AmeriCorps Program received $347,403 through New York State to deepen and broaden its service to needy and vulnerable people in New York City’s Downtown and Chinatown communities. Schools and nonprofit organizations there have been pinched by the economic crisis, and the grant will help place Pace students in after-school programs and as classroom assistants, tutors, college counselors, and instructors in English and US citizenship. The students are recruited for a year of service and learning by Pace’s Dyson Center for Undergraduate Research Experiences, working closely with the Pace Office of Co-op and Career Services.

The Principal Investigator is Professor Maria Iacullo-Bird, Executive Director of the Pace Center for Undergraduate Research Experiences, miacullobird@pace.edu.

Collaborative groups for teacher learning. Teaching based on inquiries raised and researched by high school students is increasing in US schools. To help teachers learn this methodology, Pace’s School of Education received $261,870 to partner with four secondary schools it partners with — Pace High School and Millennium High School in New York City, and Peekskill High School and Sleepy Hollow High School in Westchester County. Facilitators from the School of Education are meeting 15 times during the current school year with groups from the schools to develop the schools’ capacity to create, implement and evaluate collaborative groups of their own in which teachers raise inquiries. The project will culminate in a Teaching and Learning Conference for all stakeholders.

The Principal Investigators are Professors Christine Clayton and James Kilbane, cclayton@pace.edu and jkilbane@pace.edu. The funds come through the New York State Education Department Teacher/Leader Quality Partnership Programs.

Mentoring for urban service careers. Pace undergraduate and graduate students who are planning educationally-related urban careers in teaching, psychology, and speech pathology are getting personalized mentoring via a grant of $74,432 through the New York State Education Department to Pace’s Teacher Opportunity Corps. To improve the students’ success and retention, the program is offering personalized tutoring in service learning and instructional technology, and in career-related decision-making in areas like writing academic projects and grant applications, applying for scholarships, and career planning. Qualified participants also get stipends and undergraduate seminar credits.

The Principal Investigator is professor Mary Rose McCarthy, mmccarthy2@pace.edu.

Expanded nursing scholarships and loans. Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing received $15,256 (in part from Stimulus funds) from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration to offer scholarships to disadvantaged nursing students. The same agency also awarded the school $52,414 for its Nurse Faculty Loan Program, a loan fund for full and part-time students working toward an MA in Nursing Education. Recipients who complete the program may cancel up to 85% of their NFLP loan if they serve for four consecutive years as a full-time faculty member at a school of nursing.

Principal Investigator for the scholarships is professor Susan Gordon, sgordon@pace.edu; for the loan fund it is professor Marilyn Jaffe-Ruiz, mjafferuiz@pace.edu.

A New York City entrepreneurship website. Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems and its Pace Web Solutions Development Team received $90,000 to help the New York City Economic Development Corporation create a centralized Web portal for entrepreneurs. The portal will showcase New York as a center of entrepreneurial opportunity and become a go-to site providing information, resources and contact points for start-ups, entrepreneurs and investors of all sizes. The Pace team of technologists, Web developers and entrepreneurs will serve as a consulting group on the portal’s architecture and content, identifying the best available Web technologies.

The Principal Investigator is Professor Jonathan Hill, jhill@pace.edu, with Professors Bruce Bachenheimer and Claudia Green.

Overall assessment

“We are very pleased with the opportunistic faculty members who have taken advantage of the uniqueness of this generous funding to support the University’s many efforts to help stimulate the economy,” said Victor Goldsmith, Associate Provost for Sponsored Research and Economic Development at Pace. “Our students and faculty members are working hard on a variety of projects, and we hope to continue securing additional stimulus funds with them in the current federal fiscal year.”

To date Pace has submitted 32 stimulus proposals, of which 16 are still pending. The process for new stimulus proposal submissions is expected to end in September 2010.

About Pace

For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter | Flickr | YouTube .

Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Health Care Experts Weigh in on Reform Debate and New Cancer Screening Guidelines

Primary care nurses and nurse educators at Pace University’s rapidly-growing Lienhard School of Nursing have informed views on the current news about healthcare reform and guidelines for breast and cervical cancer screening.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Sharon Lewis, Lienhard School of Nursing, (914) 773-3973, slewis2@pace.edu Cara Cea, (914) 906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

EXPERT NURSES AVAILABLE TO COMMENT ON WAYS TO INCREASE PRIMARY CARE IN FEDERAL HEALTH CARE REFORM

AND NEW CANCER SCREENING GUIDELINES

Nurse practitioners best group to handle increasing need for primary care, says dean of nursing school; Nursing practice should not change yet, say Pace University experts

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, December 2009 – Primary care nurses and nurse educators at Pace University’s rapidly-growing Lienhard School of Nursing have informed views on the current news about healthcare reform and guidelines for breast and cervical cancer screening.

All can be reached directly at the numbers below as well as through media contacts above.

Nurse practitioners are ready to meet increased demand for primary care: Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN

Dean of the Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University, Feldman has emerged as a national authority on three major trends that are changing the nursing profession – the shortage of nurses and nurse educators, the involvement of nurses in promoting health policy, and the promotion of evidence-based procedures in education and nursing practice. With a PhD in nursing science from New York University, she has published more than 90 books, chapters and articles and testified before Congress. Her school’s enrollment is up this fall by about 80 students, the fourth year with such an increase; in recent years the school has been awarded over $5 million in federal and private grants. Lienhard’s Family Nurse Practitioner Program is ranked ninth nationally in the U.S. News & World Report survey of “America’s Best Graduate Schools 2008;” last year the school added a doctor of nursing practice program. Feldman is on US Representative Nita Lowey’s (D-NY) Health Advisory Committee and a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and of the New York Academy of Medicine. Feldman is also the 2009 chair of the Board of Commissioners of the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), the national nonprofit agency that exclusively accredits baccalaureate and higher degree programs in nursing.

Feldman says: “A major tenet of the proposed Health Care Reform legislation is to expand primary care delivery to focus on health promotion and maintenance and the management of chronic illness. The current plan very properly envisions using nurse practitioners to meet the increasing need and I cannot think of a more appropriate group of professionals.

With a focus on preventive care, nurse practitioners have been delivering primary care in a variety of inpatient, outpatient, and community settings in for over 40 years. While primary care physicians’ numbers are down 30%, the number of programs preparing nurse practitioners has been increasing annually in recent years to meet growing demand and expand the nursing workforce. There are now 323 programs that prepare students to join the workforce of 2.9 million nurse practitioners.” Nurse practitioners are registered nurses with advanced preparation and qualified to prescribe medication.

Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN Dean and Professor, Pace University Lienhard School of Nursing Interim Dean, School of Education Phone: (914)-773-3342 Fax: (914)-773-3480 Email: hfeldman@pace.edu

Don’t move too fast: Andrea Sonenberg, NP, CNM, DNSc

Assistant Professor Andrea Sonenberg, a nurse practitioner and certified nurse midwife with a doctorate from Columbia, is an expert in women’s health and in the regulation of advanced nursing practice and global use of Advanced-Practice Nurses (APNs) for vulnerable populations.

Sonenberg thinks it would be premature for APNs to change their cancer screening practices yet. She also recognizes that throughout history, periodic changes in guidelines for breast self-examination and the use of PAP smears have taken place as new evidence was uncovered and weighed by expert panels and organizations, and that these changes are always informed by dialogues beginning prior to their announcements.

She stresses that recommendations that may be made by the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) will be directed at routine screening schedules for low risk women. “Each provider must determine a client’s risk individually,” Sonenberg says.

She adds: “The fact that the USPSTF has a different membership than it did when the previous recommendations were made seven years ago is less relevant, in my view, than the fact that there is new evidence on which to base revised recommendations.”

On health care reform: “I would also like to caution against trying to link these new recommendations to the health care reform debate. I believe the timing is coincidental. Review of evidence by USPSTF is ongoing. Some believe that these recommendations are meant to save money for insurance companies, and therefore the health care system on the whole. It worries me that this belief could spread and lead us down a dangerous path regarding primary care and prevention.”

Andrea Sonenberg, NP, CNM, DNSc Assistant Professor, Pace University Lienhard School of Nursing 861 Bedford Road Pleasantville, New York 10570 Phone: (914) 773-3534 Fax: (914) 773-3345 E-mail: asonenberg@pace.edu

Still recommending mammograms: Audrey Hoover, MS, RN, FNP, WHNP

Audrey Hoover, MS, RN, FNP, WHNP, a family nurse practitioner who specializes in family and women’s health, is also taking a cautious approach to breast cancer screening and will carefully weigh all the information before changing her practice. She says, “This is very new data…. we are continuing to recommend mammograms for women at 40.”

Regarding PAP smears, Hoover recalls the overzealous screening and treatment of adolescents a few years ago that turned out to be unnecessary. Human papillomavirus (HPV) may increase the risk for cervical cancer and for abnormal PAP smears in certain women, depending on age. “We now know that he HPV virus tends to clear by about age 26,” says Hoover. “Early data analysis on the virus and recommendations on the treatment for it were premature.” Hoover is considering recommending new American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologist guidelines for PAP smears every two years starting at age 21, and every three years after age 30 for women who have had three consecutive negative PAP smears.

Hoover is associate director of University Health Care at Pace University which offers a full range of primary care services to the Pace community.

Audrey P. Hoover, FNP Family Nurse Practitioner and Associate Director Pace University Health Care NY Campus 41 Park Row, Rm 313 New York, NY 10038 Phone: 212 346-1600 Fax: 212 348-1308 E-mail: ahoover@pace.edu

About Pace University: For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV