WebMD: “Coming Out as a LGBT Teen”

Coming out as gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender can be tough at any age, but teens have a lot more to think about. Is it safe to come out at school? Will your mom or dad reject you? Will you be kicked out of the house?

If you’ve spent the past few months or years figuring out that you’re gay, bisexual or transgender, you may want to tell someone else. You want to be true to who you are.  How can you do that safely and with support?

“You need to be firm in your own identity and work through some of the issues you might have with your sexuality first,” says Regina Hund, PhD, a clinical psychologist at the Pace University Counseling Center in New York, in a WebMD feature story. “It’ll be easier to allow other people to go through their process of understanding if you are comfortable with yourself first. You’ll be less vulnerable to rejection.”

Washington Post: “U.S. reversal on gay unions won’t affect same-sex spouses for now”

Washington Post online called the Law School’s professor Darren Rosenblum (left) “an expert on gay and lesbian rights” when quoting his assessment that the Obama administration’s skepticism about the Defense of Marriage Act will require “at least a couple of years” of litigation before charges can affect gay couples.

Washington Post online called the Law School’s professor Darren Rosenblum “an expert on gay and lesbian rights” when quoting his assessment that the Obama administration’s skepticism about the Defense of Marriage Act will require “at least a couple of years” of litigation before charges can affect gay couples.

The Justice Department on Wednesday said it would no longer go to court to oppose challenges to the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act, which defines marriage as between a man and a woman and denies marriage-based federal benefits to same-sex married couples. The administration said it no longer considers the law constitutional.

The decision drew outrage from Republicans and applause from gay rights activists, who have won a series of political victories. But underlying the euphoria was a recognition that nothing had changed for same-sex married couples who say the law discriminates against them, and that the U.S. Supreme Court is likely to have the last word.

“There’s going to be at least a couple of years of litigation over this, and sooner or later the Supreme Court is going to have to weigh in,” said Darren Rosenblum, a professor at Pace Law School in New York and an expert on gay and lesbian rights.

Read the full article in the Washington Post

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