The Journal News: Completely Legal Blog – Judges to talk about challenges to judicial independence

The Journal News ran a story on the “Completely Legal” blog about an event that took place at the Law School’s Judicial Institute. A federal judge and two state judges took center stage on Tuesday, Nov. 15 to share their personal struggles with challenges their judicial independence and other political challenges to judges around the world.

The Journal News ran a story on the “Completely Legal” blog about an event that took place at the Law School’s Judicial Institute. A federal judge and two state judges took center stage on Tuesday, Nov. 15 to share their personal struggles with challenges their judicial independence and other political challenges to judges around the world.

From The Journal News:

U.S District Judge Harold Baer, New York Appellate Justice Helen E. Freedman and 9th Judicial District Administrative Judge Alan Scheinkman will lead the 90-minute discussion starting at 5:30 p.m. at the New York State Judicial Institute on the law school campus, 84 North Broadway in White Plains. The event is free and open to the public, and a reception will be held a half-hour prior to the panel discussion.

The panel discussion will spotlight Baer’s new book, “Judges Under Fire: Human Rights, Independent Judges, and the Rule of Law.” The book includes his controversial 1995 decision to suppress evidence of 80 pounds of heroin and cocaine worth more than $5 million that was obtained by stopping a car, after finding that the police did not have reasonable suspicion sufficient for the arrest. His decision prompted 200 members of Congress to demand that President Bill Clinton ask Baer to resign. Baer later reversed his ruling after the government presented a fuller case and the defendant took the stand.

Read full post here:

via Completely Legal.

NEWS RELEASE: Pace’s 48th Annual Leaders in Management Award Dinner Honors Robert S. Sands and F. Daniel Gabel on April 7; Master of Ceremonies – NPR Political Editor Ken Rudin; Entertainment – Tony Award-nominated Ann Hampton Callaway

On April 7, Pace hosts an “Evening of Culture and Wine, Insurance and the Environment, Politics, Song and Family Dynasties” by honoring at its 48th Annual Leaders in Management Awards Dinner:

*Robert S. Sands, President and CEO, Constellation Brands
* F. Daniel Gabel, Chairman and CEO, Hagedorn & Company

* Master of Ceremonies: Ken Rudin, NPR’s Political Editor

* Presenter: Brent Blackwelder, Environmental Advocate

* Jazz & Cabaret Artist: Ann Hampton Callaway, Cole Porter’s Only Collaborator

* Silent Auction: Fine Luxury Wines from Constellation Brands’ Private Collection

(Above left: Rob Sands)

Dan Gabel

April 7, 2011:  An Evening of Culture and Wine, Insurance and the Environment, Politics, Song and Family Dynasties

Pace University’s 48th Annual Leaders in Management Awards Dinner Honors:

  • Robert S. Sands, President and CEO, Constellation Brands
  • F. Daniel Gabel, Chairman and CEO, Hagedorn & Company

Master of Ceremonies: Ken Rudin, NPR’s Political Editor

Presenter: Brent Blackwelder, Environmental Advocate

Jazz & Cabaret Artist: Ann Hampton Callaway, Cole Porter’s Only Collaborator

Silent Auction: Fine Luxury Wines from Constellation Brands’ Private Collection

NEW YORK, April 4, 2011 – At its 48th Annual Leaders in Management Awards Dinner this spring, Pace University will recognize Robert S. Sands, Esq., Law ’84, an important philanthropist and business entrepreneur in upstate New York who is President and Chief Executive Officer, Constellation Brands, Inc., the world’s largest premium wine company; and F. Daniel Gabel, a significant early supporter of environmental organizations who is Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Hagedorn & Company, a major insurance brokerage firm. The event will be held at Cipriani Wall Street on Thursday, April 7, 2011. The reception starts at 6:00 pm.

The master of ceremonies at the black-tie affair will be NPR’s Political Editor‪‪ Ken Rudin, who received a BA in Political Science from his alma mater Pace and who has analyzed and predicted every congressional race in the nation with an extremely high accuracy rate since 1984. The “Political Junkie” columnist and “ScuttleButton” creator has a campaign button collection that surpasses 70,000 items.

President Emeritus of Friends of the Earth, Brent Blackwelder, an environmental activist for over 40 years, will introduce honoree Dan Gabel. A leader in the effort to save our nation’s rivers, Blackwelder helped expand the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System from eight rivers in 1973 to over 250 today.

For the first time, the gala this year will feature a silent auction of luxury wines donated generously by Constellation Brands. The brands up for auction include some of the the most sought after and highly rated wines in the industry: 2005 Château Mouton Rothschild, 2007 Opus One and the 2006 Robert Mondavi Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon.

Entertainment will be provided by Tony Awardnominated, multiplatinum songwriter and jazz vocalist Ann Hampton Callaway, along with Pace’s own musical theater students: Ally Bonino ’11, Julia Franklin ’13, Lyle Colby Mackston ’12, Michael Ryan ’13, Brandon Saenz ’11 and Emily Thomas ’12.

Proceeds from the silent wine auction as well as the event will support Pace’s Student Scholarship Program and special projects selected by the President.  Student Speaker will be Diana Cavallo, a junior at Pace’s Pforzheimer Honors College studying English/Communications.

Scions of Family Dynasties in Wine & Spirits and Insurance Brokerage Industries Share “Pace Passion”

Gabel: Five Generations of Innovative Insurance

Dan Gabel, Chairman and CEO of Hagedorn & Company, has been a leader in the insurance brokerage field since he took over as President of the company in 1979.  He is the fifth generation of his family to lead Hagedorn, which was founded in 1869, just four years after the end of the Civil War, by Banker Henry Bohlen Hagedorn and former sea captain John Miles Gillespie.

Gabel joined Hagedorn in 1964 after several years as an accountant with Price Waterhouse.  Under his leadership, Hagedorn continues to be a pioneer in insurance coverage.

A graduate of Duke University, Gabel is a member of the board of Duke’s School of Environment.  He also serves on the boards of Friends of the Earth, the Waterkeeper Alliance, Cary Institute, the Insurance Industry Charitable Foundation, as well as several corporations.  His early and steady commitment to helping organizations that work to improve the environment has been the hallmark of his public service.  In 2009, Gabel and his wife, Bunny, established The Gabel Internship Award Fund at Pace University, which awards stipends to three students who undertake summer internships at nonprofit organizations that promote environmental activism.

A trustee of his prep school, Cheshire Academy, he also serves on the board of The Hundred Year Association, which honors the achievements of organizations that have been in existence for more than a century, while also recognizing outstanding acts of public service that enhance the present and future prestige of New York City.

Gabel says Hagedorn’s basic mission remains the same today as it was more than a century ago: “to provide insurance and financial counseling to all our clients, regardless of size, so that they profit from our knowledge, service and integrity.”

Sands: “Elevating Life with Every Glass Raised'”

Robert S. Sands, Esq. Law ’84, President and CEO of Constellation Brands, is a glass-half-full kind of guy.

The first Sands winery was in North Carolina and founded in 1935 by his grandfather Mack Sands, a few years after the end of prohibition.  Ten years later, Marvin Sands, Rob’s dad, purchased a sauerkraut factory-turned-winery located in Canandaigua, New York (in the Finger Lakes region), and established Canandaigua Industries as a vendor of kosher wines made from concord grapes.

Fast forward 66 years and Canandaigua Industries is now Constellation Brands, the world’s largest premium wine company with a portfolio of more than 100 consumer brands and sales of approximately  $3.6 billion in about 125 countries and operations at approximately 30 facilities. Constellation’s brands include Robert Mondavi, Clos du Bois, Blackstone, Arbor Mist, Estancia, Ravenswood, Jackson Triggs, Kim Crawford, Corona Extra, Black Velvet Canadian Whisky and SVEDKA Vodka.

Sands studied philosophy at Skidmore College and then went on to attend Pace University’s School of Law in White Plains, New York. He earned his juris doctorate in 1984 and began his career  as a full-time associate at Harter Secrest & Emery LLP in Rochester, where he worked part time during his law-school years.

Sands joined Constellation Brands, Inc. in June 1986 as general counsel. In 1993, he was named executive vice president and general counsel.  In 1998, he was appointed CEO of Constellation International. From early 2000 through most of 2002, he served as group president with responsibility for Canandaigua Wine Company and the U.K. Division. In December 2002, Sands became president and chief operating officer and in July 2007, he was named President and CEO of the company. He is also a member of Constellation’s board of directors.

Sands is chairman of the board of the New York Wine and Culinary Center, and on the boards of the Rochester General Health System, the Rochester Business Alliance, and Thompson Health. In 2008, he was named an inaugural member of the Federal Reserve Bank (FED) of New York’s Upstate Regional Advisory Board.  A long-time supporter of arts and culture, Sands was instrumental in bringing the regionally acclaimed Rochester City Ballet to Pace’s Schimmel Theater as part of the Downtown NYC River to River Festival-Summer Stars 2010.

“We have focused on building sustainable growth by staying true to the core values and business philosophies that are the cornerstone of our inspiring heritage and foundation,” said Sands. “We believe that industry leadership involves a commitment to our brands, to the trade, to the land, to investors and to people around the world who turn to our products when celebrating big moments or enjoying quiet ones. We express this commitment through our vision: to elevate life with every glass raised.”

Leaders in Management Award

Past recipients of Pace’s Leaders In Management Award, an annual tradition since 1962, include Magazine Publishing Magnate David J. Pecker, Online Advertising Innovator Gurbaksh Chahal, Thomas J. Quinlan III, President and Chief Executive Officer of RR Donnelley; James Lipton, Dean Emeritus of the Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University; Michael O’Reilly, retired Vice Chairman and Chief Financial Officer of The Chubb Corporation; Herbert Henkel, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of the Ingersoll-Rand Company; Ivan G. Seidenberg, Chairman and CEO of Verizon Communications; Barry M. Gosin, Chief Executive Officer of Newmark Knight Frank; David Rockefeller, retired chairman of Chase Manhattan Bank; Edward D. Miller, then President and Chief Executive Officer of AXA Financial Inc; Thomas C. Hays, chairman and CEO of Fortune Brands, Inc; and Eugene R. McGrath, former Chairman of the Board of Consolidated Edison, Inc.

For further information on the Leaders in Management 48th Annual Award Dinner on April 7, ticket options and/or sponsorship opportunities, go to: http://www.pace.edu/LIM

About Pace University

For 105 years, Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

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Pace Media Contact: Samuella Becker, sbecker2@pace.edu, 212-346-1637 or 917-734-5172

Pace Law School Hosting 2nd Annual Entertainment Law Program

To keep students abreast of changes in the entertainment industry, Pace Law School adjunct professor and alumnus, Vernon Brown (left), is convening the second annual entertainment law panel, “Where Do I Sign.” The entertainment industry’s biggest execs and labels, including Cash Money Records, and top sports lawyers and agents, will give students a true insiders’ look at how the industry operates from the legal perspective.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Cathy Lewis, Director of Marketing and Communications, Pace Law School, 914.422.4128 – cdreilinger@law.pace.edu

“Where Do I Sign” to Feature Music and Sports Execs

White Plains, N.Y., November 1, 2010 – To keep students abreast of changes in the entertainment industry, Pace Law School adjunct professor and alumnus, Vernon Brown, is convening the second annual entertainment law panel, “Where Do I Sign.” The entertainment industry’s biggest execs and labels, including Cash Money Records, and top sports lawyers and agents, will give students a true insiders’ look at how the industry operates from the legal perspective. The program is open to faculty, law students and Pace University undergraduates, as well.

Professor Brown, who graduated Pace Law School in 1996, is Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of V. Brown & Company, Inc. Located in New York City, the company represents recording artists, film producers, fashion models, actors and sports stars. His Entertainment Law classes are very popular because he provides a real-life, hands-on approach. “Instead of teaching only through lectures, he gives students the opportunity to hear from his clients and colleagues,” remarked one student.

“Where Do I Sign”
Tuesday November 2, 2010
7:00PM- 9:00PM
Moot Court Room – Pace Law School
Moderator:

Michael Reinert, Executive VP Business Affairs of the Universal Music Group

Panelists (partial list):
Professor Vernon Brown
Bryan “Birdman’ Williams, Owner, Cash Money Records
Tracy Lartique, Sports Agent, CAA Sports

For more information about the panel discussion, please contact Beryl Brown, Adjunct Faculty Liaison, at 422-4264 or at bbrown@law.pace.edu.

Pace University School of Law has over 7,000 alumni throughout the country and the world, and is consistently ranked among the nation’s top four programs in environmental law. On its White Plains, NY, campus, it offers JD programs and the Master of Laws degree in Environmental Law, including the nation’s first graduate level programs in Climate Change and Land Use and Sustainable Development, and Comparative Legal Studies, and a Doctor of Laws in Environmental Law. The School of Law is part of Pace University, a comprehensive, independent, and diversified university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu.

NEWS RELEASE: The Pace Energy and Climate Center Received Award for Work on Clean Energy and Sustainability

For its work as a “tireless advocate” for clean energy, the Pace Energy and Climate Center received the Outstanding Outreach Partner Award from the Alliance for Clean Energy New York (ACE NY) at its annual meeting in Albany this afternoon.

Receives Outstanding Outreach Partner Award at ACE NY Annual Meeting

WHITE PLAINS, NY, October 28, 2010 – For its work as a “tireless advocate” for clean energy, the Pace Energy and Climate Center received the Outstanding Outreach Partner Award from the Alliance for Clean Energy New York (ACE NY) at its annual meeting in Albany this afternoon.  Presented by ACE NY’s Executive Director, Carol Murphy, this award recognizes exemplary leadership and outstanding work done on behalf of clean energy and sustainability in New York State. She praised Pace’s “dedicated efforts at the Legislature, the New York Independent System Operator (NYISO), and other state agencies and regulatory bodies, which help further positive policy developments for clean energy technologies.”

The Outstanding Outreach Partner Award is given to the individual, company or organization deemed most helpful in promoting the goals of ACE NY and sustainable energy through activities such as membership outreach, participation in public affairs and advocacy efforts, and government affairs.

“We are very pleased to receive this award, and to be recognized for our work in Albany promoting a clean energy agenda in New York State,” said Jamie Van Nostrand, executive director of the Energy and Climate Center. 

The Center’s work for alternative energy solutions in New York State includes:

  • Ensuring that the State meets its “15 by 15” energy efficiency target (achieving a 15 percent reduction in projected energy usage by 2015) through involvement in proceedings at the Public Service Commission;
  • Promoting solar energy in New York by proposing enactment of a target of 5000 MW of solar power capacity by 2025;
  • Representing environmental interests on the various stakeholder committees at the NYISO; and
  • Promoting demand response and energy efficiency as a means of avoiding investments in additional generating capacity.

 “These are critical times for laying the foundation of New York’s energy future, and we have made a significant investment in our Albany presence to advance a clean energy agenda focusing on energy efficiency, renewable energy, and other measures that reduce greenhouse gas emissions,” said Van Nostrand, adding, “It is gratifying to have these efforts recognized by ACE NY.”

The Center opened a full-time office in Albany in January 2010, and hired Jackson Morris as its senior policy advisor to work on legislative issues and to interact with key state agencies and other organizations involved in energy issues. These include the Public Service Commission, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), the Department of Environmental Conservation, and the NYISO.  According to Van Nostrand, “this award is due largely to Jackson’s tireless efforts in Albany,” with assistance from the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), which provided valuable support for the opening of the Albany office.  Van Nostrand also noted the contributions of Dr. Laurence DeWitt and Sam Swanson in providing assistance to Jackson’s efforts in Albany.

Van Nostrand indicated that Pace will continue to collaborate with ACE NY in the future in order to further our collective goals.  “As we welcome a new administration in Albany in 2011, it will be essential that we continue building on our important relationship with ACE NY and other key players in the energy and environmental community,” Van Nostrand stated.

ACE NY is a nonprofit organization coalition dedicated to promoting clean energy, energy efficiency, a healthy environment, and a strong economy for New York State.  Its mission is to promote the use of clean, renewable electricity technologies and energy efficiency in New York State, in order to increase energy diversity and security, boost economic development, improve public health, and reduce air pollution.

The Pace Energy and Climate Center is an integral part of Pace Law School’s Environmental Law Program, which is consistently ranked among the nation’s top four programs in environmental law.  For over 20 years, the Energy and Climate Center has been a leading multi-disciplinary organization in the areas of environmental research and advocacy on energy issues in New York and throughout the Northeast, while training law students in these areas.

Pace University School of Law has over 7,000 alumni throughout the country and the world, and is consistently ranked among the nation’s top four programs in environmental law. On its White Plains, NY, campus, it offers JD programs and the Master of Laws degree in Environmental Law, including the nation’s first graduate level programs in Climate Change and Land Use and Sustainable Development, and Comparative Legal Studies, and a Doctor of Laws in Environmental Law. The School of Law is part of Pace University, a comprehensive, independent, and diversified university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu.

Contact: Cathy Lewis, Director of Marketing & Communications, (914) 422-4128                                                              cdreilinger@law.pace.edu

NEWS RELEASE: Pace Environmental Law Students Take on Big Coal

Student interns at the Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic, under the supervision of law professors Karl S. Coplan, Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., and Daniel Estrin, took the first step today in bringing a lawsuit against three mining companies in Kentucky for violations of the Clean Water Act.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Cathy Lewis, Director of Marketing & Communications, (914) 422-4128, cdreilinger@law.pace.edu

Karl Coplan Co-Director, Environmental Litigation Clinic (914) 422- 4332 kcoplan@law.pace.edu

PACE ENVIRONMENTAL LAW STUDENTS TAKE ON BIG COAL

Kentucky Coal Companies Cited for Falsified Monitoring Data in Violation of Federal Law

White Plains, N.Y., October 7, 2010 – Student interns at the Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic, under the supervision of law professors Karl S. Coplan, Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., and Daniel Estrin, took the first step today in bringing a lawsuit against three mining companies in Kentucky for violations of the Clean Water Act.  Representing a coalition of environmental and social justice organizations and private citizens, including Appalachian Voices, Kentuckians for the Commonwealth, Kentucky Riverkeeper, and Waterkeeper Alliance, they filed a sixty-day notice letter alleging that the companies ICG Knott County, ICG Hazard, and Frasure Creek Mining, a subsidiary of Trinity Coal, exceeded pollution discharge limits in their permits, consistently failed to conduct the required monitoring of their discharges and, in many cases, submitted false monitoring data to the state agencies charged with protecting the public. Joining in the lawsuit were several local residents impacted by the dumping of mining waste into Kentucky’s waterways.

The coal companies cited in the notice letter are all operating in eastern Kentucky under state-issued permits that allow them to discharge limited amounts of pollutants into nearby streams and rivers.  Those same permits also require industries to carefully monitor and report their pollution discharges to state officials. These monitoring reports are public documents that can be reviewed by anyone who asks for them.

Among the allegations cited in the notice letter are exceedances and misreporting of discharges of manganese, iron, total suspended solids and pH.  The groups and local residents bringing these claims cite a total of over 20,000 incidences of these three companies, either exceeding permit pollution limits, failing to submit reports, or falsifying the required monitoring data.  These violations could result in fines that may exceed 740 million dollars.  Speaking at a press conference call this morning, Professor Coplan said, “No one should make money by violating the Clean Water Act.”

Under the Clean Water Act, the companies have sixty days to respond to the allegations made in the notice letter. If, at the end of that period, all violations have not been corrected, the groups and individuals plan on filing a complaint in federal court for the Eastern District of Kentucky.

The claims brought today may just be the tip of the iceberg when it comes to irresponsible mining reporting practices and a failure in the state’s monitoring program.  A recent trip to Kentucky’s Division of Mine Reclamation and Enforcement regional offices by Appalachian Voices’ Waterkeeper found stack after stack of discharge monitoring reports (DMRs) from more than 60 coal mines and processing facilities covered in dust on the desks of mine inspectors’ secretaries.  They did not appear to have been evaluated for compliance by the regulators for more than three years.  A sampling of the reports showed hundreds of repeated violations by coal mine operators in the state.  Commenting during the press briefing, Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. added, “Regular, systematic open fraud that anyone could have uncovered shows the contempt that the coal industry has, not just for the law but for the state agency supposed to enforce it.”

“Our state officials have closed their eyes to an obviously serious problem,” said Ted Withrow, the retired Big Sandy Basin Management Coordinator for the Kentucky Division of Water and a member of Kentuckians For The Commonwealth. “These are not small exceedances – some are over 40 times the daily maximum. This should have been a red flag.”

The allegations of falsification of monitoring reports are another blow in a long list of recent black eyes for the coal industry, which is under widespread pressure to clean up its destructive practices and take responsibility for its enormous and devastating ecological footprint.  “The coal industry has proven time and again that it can’t be trusted.  It continually downplays its severe environmental impacts, places profit over worker safety and offers false economic analysis to try to keep its inherently destructive practices alive,” said Scott Edwards, Director of Advocacy for Waterkeeper Alliance.  “And now, we know they’re not honest in reporting on matters that impact the health of communities where they operate.”

“The Clean Water Act’s ‘citizen suit’ provision empowers citizens to be ‘private attorneys general,’ and to bring polluters into court when government doesn’t do its job,” said Professor Estrin.  The organizations bringing this legal action are taking it upon themselves to enforce the law and put an end to the illegal practices.

The Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic, which represents public interest environmental advocacy groups, has been working on this matter since April.  When he first reviewed the coal companies’ monitoring reports, Professor Coplan knew it would be a good project for the students.  Clinic Legal Interns drafted the notice letters and worked with the clients to assemble the appendices to the letters identifying the specific permit violations.

Peter Harrison, one of the Clinic law students who has been working on the case since June, came to Pace from Appalachia, where he was involved in grassroots environmental initiatives.  “It’s gratifying to come to law school in New York and get to work on a lawsuit that we hope will make a difference in the lives of people in the South,” said Harrison.  “Working at the Clinic has given me an opportunity to practice law before I even pass the bar, and has really crystallized the whole reason I came to law school.”

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Pace University School of Law has over 7,000 alumni throughout the country and the world, and is consistently ranked among the nation’s top four programs in environmental law. On its White Plains, NY, campus, it offers JD programs and the Master of Laws degree in Environmental Law, including the nation’s first graduate level programs in Climate Change and Land Use and Sustainable Development, and Comparative Legal Studies, and a Doctor of Laws in Environmental Law. The School of Law is part of Pace University, a comprehensive, independent, and diversified university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu

NEWS ADVISORY: Pace Law School Winding Down Part-time Evening Program; Offers New Options in Tune with the Times

Pace Law School Dean Michelle S. Simon announced today that the faculty had voted to “gradually phase out” the part-time evening program. The viability and vitality of part-time evening programs has been an issue nationwide. Demand is down, with employer-subsidized law degrees a thing of the past, and employees reluctant to jeopardize their primary jobs by pursuing a part-time advanced degree.

WHITE PLAINS, NY, October 1, 2010 – Pace Law School Dean Michelle S. Simon announced today that the faculty had voted to “gradually phase out” the part-time evening program.

In personal letters to current students and alumni, Dean Simon cited a confluence of demographic and economic factors necessitating the decision, made after “much research and internal discussion” at the law school and Pace University. The viability and vitality of part-time evening programs has been an issue nationwide. Demand is down, with employer-subsidized law degrees a thing of the past, and employees reluctant to jeopardize their primary jobs by pursuing a part-time advanced degree.

“Phasing out what has become a costly program with steadily declining enrollment will allow the law school to reallocate resources to innovative, new programs designed to preserve flexibility and reduce the expense of a legal education,” explained Dean Simon. These initiatives include a January admit program, the part-time day program, a continuation of evening courses year-round, and the summer skills semester.

The part-time evening program has been a division of the law school since its inception in 1976. While Dean Simon conceded that “this is an emotional issue,” she is confident that “the benefits far outweigh any losses.”

The fall 2010 incoming class will be the last to enter the evening division. Students will be fully supported and retained until each member graduates over the next four years.

Pace University School of Law has over 7,000 alumni throughout the country and the world, and is consistently ranked among the nation’s top four programs in environmental law. On its White Plains, NY, campus, it offers JD programs and the Master of Laws degree in Environmental Law, including the nation’s first graduate level programs in Climate Change and Land Use and Sustainable Development, and Comparative Legal Studies, and a Doctor of Laws in Environmental Law. The School of Law is part of Pace University, a comprehensive, independent, and diversified university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu

Contact: Cathy Lewis, Director of Marketing & Communications, (914) 422-4128, cdreilinger@law.pace.edu

 Jeffrey G. Miller, Vice Dean of Academic Affairs, (914) 422- 4014, jmiller@law.pace.edu

NEWS ADVISORY: Attorney to Lecture on Hydro-Fracking, Alien Tort Claims & Torture Victim Protection, Wed. Sept. 29, 7PM

Pace Law grad Peter Cambs will lecture on hydro-fracking, the Alien Tort Claims Act and the Torture Victims Protection Act. Hydro-fracking is the controversial gas drilling process exposed as a public health threat by this year’s award-winning documentary “Gasland.”

Public health threat hydro-fracking exposed this year by award-winning documentary “Gasland”

Pleasantville, NY, September 29, 2010– Peter J. Cambs, a Pace Law graduate and an attorney with Parker Waichman Alonso LLP, will present a lecture on hydro-fracking litigation, the Alien Tort Claims Act and the Torture Victims Protection Act on Wednesday, September 29, at Pace University.

Cambs will address the controversy surrounding the gas drilling process known as hydraulic fracturing, or hydro-fracking, which was exposed by this year’s award-winning documentary “Gasland.” Hydro-fracking involves the injection of millions of gallons of chemically treated water underground to release natural gas that is trapped in rock formations. The process causes chemical additives, heavy metals, radioactive material and other toxic substances to leach into the water supply, posing a public health threat.

Cambs’ presentation will begin at 7:00pm in the Butcher Suite, at the Kessler Student Center, Pleasantville campus, 861 Bedford Rd., Pleasantville, NY, entrance 3. The event is free and open to the public.

The Department of Environmental Conservation is reviewing the environmental impact of drilling in upstate New York, where natural gas companies seek to tap the rich gas reserves of the Marcellus Shale. Cambs and his law firm, Parker Waichman Alonso LLP, recently filed a lawsuit on behalf of 13 Pennsylvania families whose well water has allegedly been contaminated by hydro-fracking fluids.

According to a September 22 article in “The Nation,”Gasland is one of the most important American films in years, exposing this threat to drinking water and public health. The film shows toxic streams, ruined aquifers, dying livestock, brutal illnesses, and kitchen sinks that burst into flame. Winner of the Special Jury Prize for Documentary at Sundance, where it premiered in January, Gasland aired on HBO in June and it is now showing in select theaters nationwide.

Legislation aiming to repeal the exemption for hydraulic fracturing in the Safe Drinking Water Act that would require the energy industry to disclose the chemicals it pumps underground in the hydraulic fracturing process has been proposed – the Fracturing Responsibility and Awareness of Chemicals (FRAC) Act.

Cambs will also discuss aspects of the Alien Tort Claims Act and Torture Victims Protection Act and how these laws afford the possibility of relief to victims of the most serious types of human rights abuses, including crimes against humanity, torture, and extrajudicial killing.

Contact: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

ABA Journal – The Immune Response

Pace Law School’s assistant dean Alexandra Dunn was quoted in a thoughtful article in the American Bar Association Journal on the disappointing record of the federal “vaccine court” set up to adjudicate disputes about diseases related to vaccines, including autism.

Click “The Immune Response” to read the full article.

Vaccine Problems? The Hazelhurst Family

Pace University named to Forbes list of “Colleges That Will Make You Rich”

Pace University has been ranked by Forbes.com as one of the top 20 “colleges that will make you rich.” The Forbes survey echoes previous findings from a PayScale/Business Week survey that found the starting median salary of recent Pace graduates was in the same league as that for graduates of Yale, Dartmouth, Harvard, Princeton, Stanford and Columbia. That survey found Pace graduates earning a starting median salary of $53,200, listed a mid-career median salary of $89,700 and found top incomes of $187,000 for Pace graduates. According to that article, “the Ivy League isn’t the only path to big bucks.”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Chris Cory, Pace, 917-608-8164, 212-346-1117, ccory@pace.edu

Pace University named to Forbes list of

“Colleges That Will Make You Rich”

Ranking maps what campuses add to salary expectations

NEW YORK, NY, September 1, 2010 – Pace University has been ranked by Forbes.com as one of the top 20 “colleges that will make you rich.”

The Forbes survey attempts to measure only what colleges and universities actually add to students’ salary expectations.

According to Forbes, to come up with the ranking their staff looked at factors like the average SAT scores of incoming students and the percentage of a student body that receives financial aid. Based on those background factors they then calculated how much one would expect graduates at each school to earn in their careers–and compared their actual earnings to that.

The average annual salary of Pace alumni 10 to 19 years after graduation is $85,031, according to data Forbes used from Payscale.com.

Other institutions in the top 20 include Dartmouth College, Williams College, Stanford University, the University of Chicago, and the University of California at Berkeley.

The results appear in a Forbes.com web feature in conjunction with Forbes’ education coverage, which also includes “America’s Best Colleges,” available online at www.forbes.com/colleges and in the August 30 issue of Forbes magazine.

High starting salaries, tooThe Forbes survey echoes previous findings from a PayScale/Business Week survey that found the starting median salary of recent Pace graduates was in the same league as that for graduates of Yale, Dartmouth, Harvard, Princeton, Stanford and Columbia. That survey found Pace graduates earning a starting median salary of $53,200, listed a mid-career median salary of $89,700 and found top incomes of $187,000 for Pace graduates. According to that article, “the Ivy League isn’t the only path to big bucks.”

Jody Queen-Hubert, Executive Director of Career Services, noted, “This shows the payoff from entering the job market with professional skills and being backed by the largest internship program in the metropolitan area. We’re proud to see this confirmation of what students get from Pace’s emphasis on strong academics and participation in hands-on learning.”

Professional education at Pace University

Since 1906, Pace University has offered professional education that combines liberal arts with practical experience and the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York. It enrolls more than 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Sen. Oppenheimer and Advocacy Groups Urge Gov. Paterson to Protect Domestic Violence Victims

Joined by representatives from the Pace Women’s Justice Center, My Sisters’ Place, Hope’s Door, and Legal Services for the Hudson Valley, Senator Suzi Oppenheimer (D-Mamaroneck) will call on Governor Paterson to sign into law sweeping legislation to strengthen the rights and protections of domestic violence survivors and increase the criminal penalties for domestic abuse.

News from STATE SENATOR Suzi Oppenheimer, New York State Senate, 37th District

For Immediate Release:

Contact: Debra Lagapa; lagapa@senate.state.ny.us; (914) 934-5250 (w); (914) 715-3125 (m)

*** MEDIA ADVISORY ***

SENATOR SUZI OPPENHEIMER STANDS WITH LEADING ADVOCACY GROUPS TO URGE GOVERNOR PATERSON TO ENACT NEW PROTECTIONS FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SURVIVORS

While violent crime overall has declined in recent years, violence against loved ones is on the rise.  In 2008, intimate partner homicides increased 25% statewide and 45% in counties outside New York City.  New York’s Domestic Violence Courts handled more than 31,000 cases in 2008, an increase of nearly 7,000 from 2007.  More than 400,000 incidents of domestic violence are reported to police departments in New York every year, while 300,000 calls are received by domestic violence hotlines throughout the state.  Indeed, 20 percent of all assaults occurring outside New York City are committed by “intimate partners.”

Joined by representatives from the Pace Women’s Justice Center, My Sisters’ Place, Hope’s Door, and Legal Services for the Hudson Valley, Senator Suzi Oppenheimer (D-Mamaroneck) will call on Governor Paterson to sign into law sweeping legislation to strengthen the rights and protections of domestic violence survivors and increase the criminal penalties for domestic abuse.

WHO: State Senator Suzi Oppenheimer (D-Mamaroneck)

Jane Aoyama-Martin, Exec. Dir., Pace Women’s Justice Center

My Sisters’ Place

Carla Horton, Exec. Dir., Hope’s Door

Robin Stiebel, Managing Atty, Yonkers office, Legal Services for the Hudson Valley

WHEN: Tuesday, August 10, 2010 @ 10:00 AM

WHERE: Pace Law School

Tudor Room, Preston Hall

78 North Broadway

White Plains, NY 10603