BroadwayWorld.com: “Jorge Luis Cacheiro as New Chair of Pace Performing Arts Department”

“We are extremely fortunate to have someone of Jorge Cacheiro’s caliber as the leader of our rapidly growing performing arts department, which has attracted nearly 400 declared majors from all over the country,” said Nira Herrmann, PhD. Dean, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences.

Jorge Luis Cacheiro joins Pace from Montclair State University, where he was the founder and first director of the New Works Initiative (NWI), which is dedicated to developing new work for the American theater and dance world.

A graduate of the Yale School of Drama, during the past two decades Cacheiro has also headed MFA Professional Director Training Programs at Ohio University in Athens, the University of Southern California in Los Angeles and the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. 

Considered one of the country’s leading acting teachers, Cacheiro has taught Master classes at UCLA, Cal Arts, Princeton and the University of Iowa, as well as run his own studio in Los Angeles.

“From my very first visit on Pace’s campus, I sensed an immense energy from students, faculty and administration alike,” said Cacheiro, in an article appearing on BroadwayWorld.com. “There is an undeniable united goal to make Pace’s Performing Arts Deparrtment (PAD) one of the nation’s leading professional training programs. I am confident that with the support of our outstanding faculty, we will succeed.”

In choosing Cacheiro, PAD has gotten a scholar/artist with a keen entrepreneurial vision of present-day education.  According to Cacheiro, “We are in the business of education. This is our contemporary reality. I am very comfortable in both of these worlds. The cross section between the university world and the larger industry is still being defined. I believe it offers immense opportunities in the training and career prospects of young artists and creative thinkers.”

Cacheiro plans to immediately introduce a New Work Initiative similar to one he created at Montclair State University. This would complement the Pace New Musicals program.

“The two programs will help imprint Pace’s Performing Arts Department as an important incubator of new American performance work, a place where major professional artists — writers, composers, choreographers — can draft and develop work in a safe environment,” elaborated Cacheiro. “For our students to take part in the process as performers is an invaluable training and networking opportunity. We want to nurture work at Pace from the development phase hopefully all the way to a world premiere.”

One Mental Health Message Does Not Fit All; Pace University Customizes Suicide-Prevention Outreach to Reflect Multicultural and Sexual Differences

“It is our belief that diversity issues have yet to be comprehensively addressed in suicide prevention, despite the urgent need to do so,” said Dr. Richard Shadick.

Uses $364,000 SAMHSA Grant; Offers Kits Free to Schools – 

NEW YORK, NY, October 28, 2010 – “The way a young gay Puerto Rican man will tell you he is feeling depressed and suicidal differs greatly from the way an Asian-American student will tell you,” says Richard Shadick, PhD, director of the Counseling Center on Pace University’s New York City campus and an adjunct professor of psychology.

Building on that insight, Pace’s Counseling Center is using grants totaling $364,000 from the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to enhance the multicultural competence of staff and faculty members who work with students and may refer them to counseling.

Multicultural Competence Suicide Prevention Kits – including brochures and posters, educational materials, public service announcements and training vignettes for role play – have been created, targeting students from seven different groups: African-Americans, Asian-Americans, Muslims, Latinos, international students, disabled students and those who are lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered (LGBT). Staff members have also disseminated these kits to schools nationally and trained mental health professionals on other campuses on how to use them. Their efforts have been featured as a model program in a SAMHSA suicide prevention monograph.

“It is our belief that diversity issues have yet to be comprehensively addressed in suicide prevention, despite the urgent need to do so,” said Shadick, pointing out those who are at particular risk being:

African-Americans who are alienated from their spiritual community or feel a stigma in seeking counseling.

Asian-Americans who feel a conflict between Asian culture and American culture.

Disabled students who deny the impact of their disability and have persistent beliefs in attaining full health and/or ability when it is not possible.

LGBT students who lack of family acceptance and support of their sexuality.

International students who are struggling with acculturation, socially isolated and have language barriers.

Latinos who are socially isolated from their spiritual community, in the midst of a relationship break up high or who endure sexual abuse.

Muslims who are struggling with their spirituality or who are disconnected from family.

Further efforts are underway at Pace, which is recognized for its undergraduate and graduate programs in clinical psychology, to research the nature of suicide for diverse student groups.

Schools who would like to obtain a free Multicultural Competence Suicide Prevention Kit should send their request to Dr. Shadick at rshadick@pace.edu

Psychology Department on Pace University’s New York City Campus

Pace offers two undergraduate degrees, a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Bachelor of Arts in Applied Psychology and Human Relations; and four graduate degrees, MSEd in School Psychology, MSEd in Bilingual School Psychology, MA in General Psychology, and PsyD in School-Clinical Child Psychology. Pace’s PsyD degree is approved by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) and accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA), and is one of only 10 nationwide recognized as a combined professional-scientific doctoral program by the APA.

Professional Education at Pace University

Since 1906, Pace University has offered professional education that combines liberal arts with practical experience and the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York. It enrolls more than 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences (which includes The Actors Studio Drama School’s MFA, the Acting BFA, Musical Theater BFA and Theater Arts BA programs), Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

For more information:

Samuella Becker
Media Relations/Pace University
(212) 346-1637 or (917) 734-5172
Sbecker2@pace.edu

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Economic Benefits and Emerging Community Issues of Latinos in Westchester Is Topic of Forum at Pace University, September 28

“During the 1990s, 53,000 new immigrants settled in Westchester, many of them from Spanish-speaking countries. In the 2000s, we expect this trend to continue and grow,” said Andy Spano, Westchester county executive. “While this new diversity brings vitality to Westchester, it also challenges us to find ways to make our new residents feel welcome and help them assimilate.”

Contact: Public Affairs
(914) 923-2798
News@Pace.Edu

WHITE PLAINS, N. Y. – “During the 1990s, 53,000 new immigrants settled in Westchester, many of them from Spanish-speaking countries. In the 2000s, we expect this trend to continue and grow,” said Andy Spano, Westchester county executive. “While this new diversity brings vitality to Westchester, it also challenges us to find ways to make our new residents feel welcome and help them assimilate.”

Pace University’s Michaelian Institute for Public Policy and Management, the Westchester Hispanic Coalition, the Westchester Municipal Officials Association and Westchester County will host a forum, Latinos in Westchester: Economic Benefits and Emerging Community Issues, for municipal leaders, community advocates and interested citizens on Thursday, September 28. The workshop begins at 5:30 p.m. with a buffet supper at Pace’s Graduate Center, One Martine Avenue, in White Plains. The fee (which includes dinner) is $25.

“Latinos in Westchester is a place where community leaders can exchange ideas on the topics of housing, recreation, cultural differences and community policing,” said Spano. The keynote presentations will address Emerging Latino Communities and Their Impact on Your Community by Arnoldo H. Resendez, Vice President for Technical Assistance and Constituency Support, National Council of La Raza; and The Social and Economic Impact of Immigration in the New York Metropolitan Area, by Dr. Philip Kasinitz, Professor of Sociology, Hunter College and CUNY Graduate School.

“We need to work collaboratively, local government, business organizations, and leading educational institutions, like Pace University, to insure that the needs of the Latino populations are met,” said Anthony Cupaiuolo, director of the Michaelian Institute. Workshop sessions include discussions of recreation, culture and education, housing and code enforcement, police and community relations, and organizing and insuring the rights of day laborers. “The conference workshops will provide participants with the best practice for each of the issues that will be discussed,” said Cupaiuolo.

The Edwin G. Michaelian Institute for Public Policy and Management and its legal research affiliate, the Municipal Law Resource Center (MLRC), respond to the needs of the public and not-for-profit sectors for governance and management training and development and for research and support to enhance their operations. The Michaelian Institute and the MLRC are part of Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences.

The Westcheser Hispanic Coalition is a private, not-for-profit human services agency dedicated to the economic and social development of the Latino community by implementing programs that facilitate greater community integration. Founded in 1974, the Coalition is uniquely qualified to articulate the concerns of Latino immigrants in Westchester.

The Westchester Municipal Officials Association provides a forum for all of Westchester’s 45 cities, towns and villages to discuss issues of mutual concern. The association studies and discusses activities and actions that will have a beneficial effect upon the public safety, health and welfare of its members’ citizenry.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.