Westchester County Business Journal: Committee to Save NY Spends Nearly $12 Million in 2011

John Alan James, executive director of Pace University’s Center for Global Governance, was called upon to comment on what Cuomo’s election as governor has meant to New York businesses.

Professor John Alan James was called upon to comment on what Cuomo’s election as governor has meant to New York businesses.

From The Westchester County Business Journal:

In Gov.-elect Andrew Cuomo, the state’s business leaders saw an opportunity.

At the time, New York businesses – still struggling to recover from the effects of the economic downturn – were frustrated with what they viewed as a lack of effort among the state’s lawmakers to promote business-friendly policies.

That frustration gave rise to Committee to Save New York Inc., an organization comprising business groups and, to a lesser extent, organized labor. It was established 15 months ago to promote a reform agenda at the state government level.

John Alan James, executive director of Pace University’s Center for Global Governance, Reporting and Regulation, said support from the business community represented a refreshing alternative to the messages often promulgated by special interests.

“This is long overdue and greatly needed,” he said. “I wish them all the power in the world and I wish there were more of them.”

Read the rest of the article at Westfair Online.

Bloomberg Businessweek: “Pace: Compliance”

Lubin’s Center for Global Governance, Reporting and Regulation won’t open its doors until February 2. But it has already attracted attention and writeups from leading financial publications, such as Bloomberg Businessweek.

Comings and Goings

Pace Creates Center for Global Governance, Regulation

As reported by Carla Main in Bloomberg Businessweek:

Pace University’s Lubin School of Business has established a Center for Global Governance, Reporting and Regulation, according to a statement by the school.

John Alan (Jack) James, a Lubin professor and proponent of the teaching of comparative corporate governance, has been named the center’s inaugural executive director, the university said in the statement. James, an author and consultant for 40 years, has taught in business schools in France, Switzerland, and the U.S.

Next month the Lubin center will begin offering a six-month certificate program. The center will also serve as a setting for the exchange of views among professionals and policy makers on “issues facing world economies,” the university said in the statement.

NEWS RELEASE: “Pace University Establishes Center for Global Governance, Reporting and Regulation; John Alan James, Recognized International Corporate Governance Leader, Named Executive Director

“At no time in history have international governance and regulation been more important to the business, government and public sector than they are today,” said Neil S. Braun, Dean of the Lubin School of Business, in announcing Pace’s new Center for Global Governance, Reporting and Regulation. John Alan James (pictured), an international expert on how corporations are governed, has been named the center’s inaugural executive director. James has over 40 years of experience as an author and consultant in Europe, Asia and the U.S., and as an instructor at leading European business schools such as INSEAD and IMD.

Pace University Establishes Center for Global Governance, Reporting and Regulation

 John Alan James, Recognized International Corporate Governance Leader, Named Executive Director

“Future Business Leaders Must Be Prepared for a Global Regulatory Labyrinth,” Says Neil S. Braun, Dean of the Lubin School of Business

Offers Certified Compliance and Regulatory Professional Certificate – Classes Begin February 2, 2012 

NEW YORK, NY, January 23, 2012 – At a time when European financial uncertainty is underscoring the impact of international businesses and economies on the U.S., the Lubin School of Business at Pace University has established a Center for Global Governance, Reporting and Regulation.

John Alan (Jack) James, a Lubin professor and major proponent of the teaching of comparative corporate governance, has been named the center’s inaugural executive director. James brings the center over 40 years of experience as an author and consultant in Europe, Asia and the U.S., and as an instructor at leading European business schools including INSEAD (Institut Européen d’Administration des Affaires, near Paris), CEI (Centre d’Etudes Industrielles in Geneva, Switzerland), IMD (International Institute for Management Development in Lausanne, Switzerland), and the Northwestern Kellogg European Management Program (Lausanne).  In the United States, he has been a guest lecturer at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, Cornell and Northwestern.   

Beginning February 2, the new Lubin center is offering a six-month program leading to a new Certified Compliance and Regulatory Professional (CCRP™) certificate.  The center also is planned to be an academic setting for professional organizations, business leaders and policymakers to exchange views on key issues facing world economies. It will provide thought leadership on current and emerging issues, conducting independent research and disseminating the findings, sponsoring guest speakers, hosting special events and participating in academic and industry conferences.

“At no time in history have international governance and regulation been more important to the business, government and public sector than they are  today,” said Neil S. Braun, the former President of the NBC Television Network and Chairman of Viacom Entertainment who is Lubin’s dean.

“Changes in the already-complex regulatory system are occurring daily in nations around the world,” Braun added. “The European Union is requiring new and tighter regulations, and the meetings of the G-20, the IMF and the Bank for International Settlements, Basel, are introducing numerous new ideas for achieving convergence and establishing a level playing field across the globe. Future business leaders must be prepared for a global regulatory labyrinth, and Lubin is building upon its track record in teaching comparative governance.”

James, an international expert on how corporations are governed, founded Management Counsellors International, S.A., a Belgian corporation, where he advised clients including 50 of the U.S. Fortune 100 major multinational corporations and foreign companies like Fiat, Henkel and Siemens on market entry strategies and operating in “foreign” regulatory environments. He is also the author of over 80 articles and 52 publications.  These include what are believed to be the first publications in English on how corporations are governed in Europe, detailing the stakeholder/workers’ voice approach used by all countries outside the U.S. and the British Commonwealth. 

Recalls James, “These loose-leaf text books were published in a series of three constantly updated versions entitled Company Law and Governance, Labor Law and Industrial Relations, and Employment Law and issued by my own publishing company in Brussels, which in 1979 was sold to Management Centre Europe, the European headquarters of the American Management Association. These ‘best-sellers’ became an important source of information for firms investing in Europe and a basis for integrating governance policies and regulations at the level of the European Commission (EC) — the executive body of the European Union (EU) — and national governments.” 

The new center’s first instructional program, a collaborative venture with the Association of International Bank Auditors (AIBA), leads to a certificate as a Certified Compliance and Regulatory Professional or CCRP™.  The comprehensive six-month, 75-hour, 25-session course — www.pace.edu/lubin/ccrp — will provide intensive regulatory strategy and compliance training to professionals in global financial services. The first students will include AIBA internal audit, compliance and internal control employees from the association’s membership in nearly 100 branches and agencies of foreign banks doing business in the United States.

James said developing the new CCRP™ program took four professors and eight industry professionals nearly 1,000 hours, adding that it is “the first collaboration by the AIBA with an academic partner.” 

International governance expert, author and global educator

James began his management consulting career with Hewitt Associates in Chicago and McKinsey & Co. in New York City. While consulting in Europe, from 1976 to 1980, he was appointed by Governor Ella Grasso as the State of Connecticut’s first Director of International Business and Economic Development, a part-time position. His activities resulted in moves of a dozen major European firms to build important subsidiaries in the state.

A frequent guest lecturer at business meetings around the world, James co-chaired the first UN conference on multinational companies and multinational trade unions at the International Labour Organization in ILO in Geneva in 1978. He was also an early contributor to the functions of the European Management Forum, now the World Economic Forum (WEF), in Davos.

A resident of Fairfield County, Connecticut, James earned his bachelor’s degree in political science from Northwestern University and an MBA from the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business. In 2003, James joined Lubin as a Professor of Management, creating one of the first graduate business school courses in Comparative Corporate Governance Systems.  He also teaches a course on Regulatory Strategy.

In recent years he has been quoted as an expert source on corporate governance and regulation in such business publications as The Wall Street Journal, Financial Times and Investor’s Business.

Evolution from accounting standards

The new Center for Global Governance, Reporting and Regulation is an outgrowth of Lubin’s Center for the Study of International Accounting Standards, itself an outgrowth of Lubin’s 105-year record as a leader in the teaching of accounting.

The earlier Center sponsored major conferences between 2008 and 2010 on the impending convergence of U.S. and international accounting standards, and developed curriculum segments for Lubin courses on the global spread of such standards. That, in turn, led to a realization that knowledge of international reporting standards alone is not sufficient in the current business environment and that grounding in governance and regulatory compliance also is essential.

“This is one of the essential expertises of the future,” James underscored.

About the Lubin School of Business at Pace University: Globally recognized and prestigiously accredited, the Lubin School of Business integrates New York City’s business world into the experienced-based education of its students at Pace’s suburban and downtown campuses, implemented by the region’s largest co-op program, team-based learning, and customized career guidance. Its programs are designed to launch success-oriented graduates toward upwardly mobile careers.  www.pace.edu/lubin

About Pace University: For 105 years Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

About The Association of International Bank Auditors (AIBA): The AIBA membership consists of internal audit, compliance and internal control professionals of nearly 100 U.S. branches and agencies of foreign banks.  The mission of the AIBA is to foster the professional standing of its members by increasing their knowledge and capacities to carry out their responsibilities with respect to international banking.

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Pace Media Contact: Samuella Becker, sbecker2@pace.edu; 212-346-1637 (office) or 917-734-5172 (mobile)

CCRPTM Program Contact: BrianPew, bpew@pace.edu; 212-618-6444

AOL Jobs, The Journal News: Professor John Alan James quoted in big name business articles

John Alan James, professor of business management at Pace University, is sought out for his expertise in the world of Business as he is quoted in AOL Jobs and The Journal News online this week.

John Alan James, professor of business management at Pace University, is sought out for his expertise in the world of Business as he is quoted in AOL Jobs and  The Journal News online this week.

“Whether a company can simply up and move to avoid new or higher taxes depends on the size and type of business, John Alan James, professor of business management at Pace University, told AOL Jobs.

Larger companies with a lot of employees and significant infrastructure in a state probably won’t opt to move lock, stock and barrel. But they may choose to show their displeasure at higher taxes by siting a new plant or subsidiary somewhere else.

That’s especially true in today’s global marketplace where cheaper labor can be found in countries around the world, says James, who served as Connecticut’s first director of International Business Economic Development.-“

–  “Employers Threaten to Leave States Seeking to Boost Taxes” AOL Jobs

“‘The political mess in Washington makes everyone uneasy,” said John Alan James, a professor at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business”

– “Moody’s warns Westchester: Aaa bond rating at risk” Journal News

Visit Pace’s Lubin School of Business

IndustryWeek: “Schooled By Scandals”

Pace professor John Alan James (left) is quoted in an Industry Week article about foreign bribery scandals and the lessons that they teach to companies trying to expand their global presence.

Pace professor John Alan James is quoted in an Industry Week article about foreign bribery scandals and the lessons that they teach to companies trying to expand their global presence.  Taken from the article:

Corporate governance expert John Alan James takes it a step further and says internal controls begin with board directors who define codes of conduct. Companies then need leaders who “set the tone,” says James, a professor at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in New York. Simply throwing money at the problem won’t erase a poor corporate culture, he adds. “There is one company I know of that spends millions of dollars a year on corporate conduct, and they have one of the lousiest criminal incident rates of any company I’ve ever known,” he says.

To read the full article, visit Industry Week.

Visit the Lubin Business School here!