914INC: “Westchester Corporations’ Charitable Involvement”

Rebecca Tekula, PhD, and Anna-Kay Sinclair of The Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Pace University are interviewed about corporate philanthropy in Westchester—who gives and what they get in return.

Hundreds of companies make a conscious effort to support worthy causes in the county. But what do the companies—and their stockholders—get out of the deal, wondered reporter Dave Donelson in an article appearing in Westchester business lifestyle magazine 914Inc.

It’s not an idle question. Corporate philanthropy is big business in Westchester and it’s growing more important as nonprofit providers of essential social services face budget cuts from state, county, and municipal governments and declines in giving by private individuals.

How big?

According to Anna-Kay Sinclair of The Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Pace University, there were 971 registered private foundations with assets of over $2.8 billion in the county in 2010. That year, six Westchester-based corporate foundations made up 20 percent of total private foundation revenue—more than $78 million of the $391 million total for the county. The major half-dozen were foundations funded by PepsiCo, Pepsi Bottling Group, IBM, Dannon, Heineken, and MBIA based in Armonk.  

Potential sales growth helps explain what The Wilson Center’s executive director, Rebecca Tekula, PhD, observes: “What I see is less idiosyncratic donations based on the personal interests of the corporate leaders and more social responsibility related to the core business.”

In other words, donations are made not because the CEO likes the opera, but because companies believe it helps build the bottom line.

NEWS RELEASE: Seidenberg Professor Christelle Scharff Wins IBM Smarter Planet Faculty Innovation Award

Today IBM announced the 50 global recipients of the inaugural Smarter Planet Faculty Innovation Awards. Each professor — representing 40 universities in 14 countries — will be recognized with a $10,000 award to create new smarter technology curriculum and prepare the next generation of students for leadership in the industries of their choice. One winner was Pace University’s Christelle Scharff, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Computer Science, Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. (Left: Scharff; Credit: Pace Press)

Posted on behalf of IBM:

As population rates rise, civic leaders face an unprecedented series of challenges, including massive urbanization, stressed infrastructure and economic crisis. The project from Pace University, for example, “Across Cities for Cities,” involves teams of students in New York working with students from Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Delhi, India, and Dakar, Senegal, developing mobile and smartphone applications for transportation, health care and education, with the solutions being implemented in each city for evaluation and improvement. These solutions will tackle problems such as identifying the closest public transportation to a specific destination or finding the nearest emergency room.

Students around the world are working on innovative projects that will help address critical challenges in city development, transportation and health care, thanks to grants from IBM.  IBM is working with universities around the globe on groundbreaking curricula that is changing the face of education and bringing real-world technologies and applications into the classroom. These curricula include the exploration of a variety of Watson-like technologies that will empower and inspire the next generation of leaders with insights into how technology can help tackle some of the world’s most pressing challenges.

Today IBM announced the 50 global recipients of the inaugural Smarter Planet Faculty Innovation Awards. Each professor  — representing 40 universities in 14 countries — will be recognized with a $10,000 award to create new smarter technology curriculum and prepare the next generation of students for leadership in the industries of their choice.

One winner was Pace University’s Christelle Scharff, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Computer Science, Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. Teams of students will be distributed across four cities around the globe – New York, Phonh Penh, Cambodia, Delhi, India, and Dakar, Senegal — to develop mobile solutions aimed at improving life for people living in cities.  Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N0TXms63jcM

IBM’s Watson technology, which recently bested quiz show champions on Jeopardy, has made technology breakthroughs top of mind for thousands of students around the world. By bringing Watson-like technologies into the classroom, IBM and the winning faculty members are sparking innovation and encouraging students to look at global challenges from a fresh perspective. This competitive award program is intended to foster collaboration between researchers at leading universities and those in IBM research, development and services organizations. In addition, the program aims to promote courseware and curriculum innovation to stimulate growth in disciplines and geographies strategic to IBM.

NEWS RELEASE: STUDENTS WORLDWIDE TO COLLABORATE ON PROJECTS TO IMPROVE CITIES, TRANSPORTATION AND HEALTH CARE

IBM Unveils Smarter Planet Faculty Innovation Awards for Groundbreaking Curricula
ARMONK, N.Y. – May 5, 2011 — University students around the world are working on new projects, including developing smarter urban and transportation solutions and improved health care systems, with help from IBM (NYSE: IBM). Fifty professors from 40 universities in 14 countries have been recognized with a Smarter Planet Faculty Innovation award from IBM.

[EMBEDDED VIDEO: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OuqmgY1-dJ0]

As population rates rise, civic leaders face an unprecedented series of challenges, including massive urbanization, stressed infrastructure and economic crisis. The project from Pace University, for example, “Across Cities for Cities,” involves teams of students in New York working with students from Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Delhi, India, and Dakar, Senegal, developing mobile and smartphone applications for transportation, health care and education, with the solutions being implemented in each city for evaluation and improvement. These solutions will tackle problems such as identifying the closest public transportation to a specific destination or finding the nearest emergency room.

IBM created the $10,000 awards to help universities develop innovative new curricula that address the global challenges of transportation, health care, water, energy and other systems. The new courses will prepare students for future leadership in a variety of industries by exposing them to Watson-like technologies in the classroom, sparking collaboration and innovation.

“We need to focus on developing more advanced skills so that students around the world are equipped to tackle real-world issues when they enter the workforce,” said Jim Corgel, general manager of IBM Academic and Developer Relations. “The work of these 50 award recipients should help change the face of education by enabling students to work on pressing issues facing cities today – and at the same time prepare them for leadership in industries like healthcare and transportation.”

Each year American drivers waste an estimated 3.7 billion hours, the equivalent of five days each, sitting in traffic burning 2.3 billion gallons of fuel. Students at the University at Buffalo are analyzing U.S. border control data to learn how advanced technology solutions may help improve the sustainability of the transportation system. The project focuses on local highway traffic and reducing congestion around the three U.S. and Canadian border crossings in the region.

City infrastructures that deliver vital services can now rely on a wealth of new information and technologies enabling them to sense and respond intelligently to the needs of their growing populations. RMIT University in Australia is helping students explore how advanced technology and sensors can play a role in building a smarter, interconnected city. Working together with students in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, students are using local real-world examples to evaluate new urban planning and development options for vital city services such as transportation, healthcare and energy.

These new classes are being taught in the 2011-2012 school year.  Find out more about the award winners at http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/university/smartplanet/awards. Additional videos of select award winners are available at www.youtube.com/IBMFacultyAwards.

Editors’ Note: Photos are available via the Associated Press Photo Network and on the Internet at Feature Photo Service’s link through http://www.newscom.com.

Fall 2011 Smarter Planet Faculty Innovation Awards Now Open for Submissions

The fall 2011 Smarter Planet Faculty Innovation awards are now open for submissions of proposed curricula to support Smarter Commerce, Smarter Communications and Smarter Energy.

For more information on IBM’s university initiatives, visit www.ibm.com/press/university.

IBM Press room – 2011-05-05 Students Worldwide To Collaborate On Projects To Improve Cities, Transportation and Health Care – United States.

Read more about Scharff’s work here.

Watch the YouTube video here: http://youtu.be/OuqmgY1-dJ0

The New Yorker blog, Investor’s Business Daily and others: “IBM’s Watson Aims Far Beyond ‘Jeopardy’ Matchup”

Professor Darren Hayes is quoted in multiple articles about a Jeopardy game show which tests man against machine (IBM’S Watson supercomputer). Hayes showcases his knowledge of homeland security and computer forensics.

From the Investor’s Business Daily (Investors.com) article:

Darren Hayes, computer information systems program chairman at New York’s Pace University, adds national defense to the list. Hayes is not connected with IBM or Watson, but based on his expertise in computer forensics and homeland security, he says the technology could significantly assist in that arena.

“The focus (on homeland security) has been on information gathering — license plates, credit card transactions, Internet activity, flight manifests, telephone records, bank transactions, and so on — for millions of people. Synthesizing those terabytes of information is tremendously challenging,” Hayes said, adding that Watson can pull together these vast amounts of data much faster than earlier technology.

Hayes’ knowledge and expertise was also used in The New Yorker blog, NYConvergence.com and the Seattle Weekly blog.

Since December, Hayes has been sought after by multiple media, from CNN and Fox News to Government Executive Magazine, for views on other topics including the security of federal computer systems and Wikileaks.

Check out Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems here.

Pace Commencements to Honor NPR Journalist, Chilean Ambassador, IBM Innovator & Head of Asia Society

Influential leaders from media, science and world affairs in the US, Chile and Asia make up this year’s list of commencement speakers at Pace University’s ceremonies. Media admission is by press pass.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts: Chris Cory, 212-346-1117, 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu Bill Caldwell, 212-346-1567, wcaldwell@pace.edu Cara Halstead Cea, 914-906-9680 or 845-642-4051, chalstead@pace.edu

NPR LAW JOURNALIST, SUCCESSFUL OPPONENT OF CHILEAN DICTATOR, IBM INNOVATION LEADER AND HEAD OF ASIA SOCIETY TO ADDRESS PACE UNIVERSITY 2009 COMMENCEMENTS NPR correspondent Nina Totenberg will address Law School graduates May 17 Nicholas Donofrio, recently-retired IBM EVP of innovation and technology, to speak to Westchester undergrads May 18 Chilean ambassador to UN to talk to New York City undergraduates May 20 in AM Vishakha Desai, president of Asia Society to address graduate students May 20 in afternoon NEW YORK, NY,

April 10, 2009 – Influential leaders from media, science and world affairs in the US, Chile and Asia make up this year’s list of commencement speakers at Pace University’s ceremonies. Media admission is by press pass.

SCHEDULE AND HONORARY DEGREE RECIPIENTS: Westchester Ceremonies Law School Sunday, May 17, 2009, 10:00 a.m. Pace University Law School, 78 North Broadway, White Plains, NY Nina Totenberg, Correspondent, Legal Affairs, Washington Desk, National Public Radio. Honorary Doctor of Laws In thirty-four years with NPR, Totenberg has reported stories that have drawn national attention, including Anita Hill’s allegations of sexual harassment by now-Justice Clarence Thomas, which caused the Senate Judiciary Committee to reopen the confirmation hearings. Named twice as one of the “Women We Love” by Esquire magazine, her broadcasts for NPR make significant Supreme Court rulings accessible to the public. Westchester Undergraduate Monday, May 18, 2009, 11:00 a.m. Ann & Alfred Goldstein Health and Fitness Center, Pleasantville Campus, 861 Bedford Rd., Pleasantville, NY, entrance # 3 Nicholas Donofrio, IBM Fellow, (Retired) Executive Vice President, Innovation and Technology, IBM Corporation, Honorary Doctor of Science Donofrio created and led the research and development staff that made it possible for IBM to generate more U.S. patents than any other company for each of the last 16 years, and has been an architect of the world’s information technology landscape in areas from logic and memory chips to storage technologies, personal computers, IBM’s family of servers, and supercomputers. In 2005, Mr. Donofrio was appointed by the U.S. Department of Education to serve on the Commission on the Future of Higher Education. New York City Ceremonies Radio City Music Hall, Avenue of the Americas (6th Avenue between 50th and 51st Streets) New York Undergraduate Commencement Wednesday, May 20, 10:30 a.m. Radio City Music Hall Ambassador Heraldo Munoz, Permanent Representative of Chile to the United Nations and Chairman of the United Nations Peacebuilding Commission, Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters Muñoz founded the Party for Democracy and under enormous stress helped defeat General Augusto Pinochet in 1988. As Chile’s Deputy Minister of Foreign Relations he was the chief negotiator of the country’s trade agreement with the European Union. At the UN, he has served on the Security Council and chaired a special committee on sanctions against Al Qaeda, recording reflections in a recent book, A Solitary War: A Diplomat’s Chronicle of the Iraq War and its Lessons. The most recent of more than a dozen books was published last year and is titled The Dictator’s Shadow: Life under Augusto Pinochet. The Washington Post listed it among the best books of 2008, calling it “meticulous and vivid, … a compelling personal account of life in a police state and a strong reminder of how far Chile has come.” Westchester & New York combined Graduate Ceremonies Wednesday, May 20, 4:00 p.m. Radio City Music Hall Vishakha Desai, President, Asia Society, Doctor of Humane Letters Vishakha Desai, chosen in 2007 by Crain’s New York as one of the “100 most influential women in New York City business,” is the first woman and first Asian-American to become the President and CEO of Asia Society. A noted historian of Asian art, she has expanded the society’s branches in Asia and demonstrated its influence by having it chosen as the location of Hillary Clinton’s first major speech after becoming Secretary of State as well as having hosted President George W. Bush, Indian Prime Minister Mammohan Singh, Chinese President Hu Jintao and President Hamid Karzai of Afghanistan. Thinking professionals. For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality professional education resting on a firm base of liberal learning, amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu