MidHudsonNews.com: “Cronin awarded Jefferson Gold Medal”

John Cronin has been a part of the Hudson River environmental movement since 1973 when he started with the Clearwater organization. He reflects how Clearwater founder Pete Seeger recruited him as a volunteer.

John Cronin is a senior fellow at Pace University and executive director of the Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries.

He can also add another title to his resume, a recipient of the Jefferson Award, named for Thomas Jefferson and founded by former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis as a “Noble Prize for public service.”

Cronin was described by the Jefferson Awards Board of Selectors as “Hero for the Planet [and] equal parts detective, scientist and public advocate.” The board said his efforts “have inspired a legacy of programs across the globe, fighting pollution on six continents.”

The MidHudsonNews reports Pace University President Stephen Friedman nominated Cronin for the award, for which Cronin said he was both humbled and honored.

Poughkeepsie Journal: “Hudson River steward receives Jefferson Award”

Steward of the Hudson River and water quality, John Cronin, received a 2011 Jefferson Award for his decades of public service.

John Cronin, a resident of Cold Spring, is known for his 17 years at environmental group Riverkeeper, and is the director and CEO of Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries. He is also a Pace University senior fellow.

At the Beacon Institute, Cronin directs a program that monitors rivers and estuaries using a network of sensors and robotics.

He lectures on the environment, co-authored “The Riverkeepers” with Robert F. Kennedy Jr., and wrote and co-produced the film “The Last Rivermen.”

Cronin told the Poughkeepsie Journal that he credited folksinger Pete Seeger and Pace University as his sources of inspiration.

The Journal News: “Ex-Riverkeeper John Cronin receives Jefferson Award”

Former Riverkeeper John Cronin joined a select group this week that included U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and actress Marlo Thomas.

They all received what has been dubbed the “Nobel Prize” for public service — the Jefferson Award.

John Cronin, 60, has worked on environmental issues facing the Hudson River for nearly four decades and was one of 18 people honored with  The Jefferson Award in a ceremony in Washington, DC, Tuesday night.

“It was quite a surprise,” Cronin said Friday to The Journal News. “Some of the awards are known ahead of time, others are kept under wraps. I was just going there to represent Pace University. I still haven’t figured out who knew and who didn’t.”

“The big theme of the two days was that everyday people can change the world,” Cronin said. “It reminded me what a special place the Hudson River Valley is, that we started an environmental movement before there was an Earth Day, when environmentalism wasn’t very popular at all.”

Representing Pace, Cronin was given a Champion award, presented to two “exceptional individuals whose volunteer work reflects the deep and abiding commitment of their employers to making a different in the communities where their employees live and work.”

The award cited his work as an environmental advocate for nearly four decades, serving “on the front lines of water-quality issues as a legislative aide, riverkeeper, and as the co-founder of the Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic, a nationally acclaimed training program for law students and educators.”

Cronin is director and CEO of Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries, and a Senior Fellow for Environmental Affairs, Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies at Pace University.

NEWS RELEASE: Climate Action Plan for Town of Red Hook to be developed by Pace Law School’s Energy and Climate Center

Pace Law School’s Energy and Climate Center will be developing an action plan for the town of Red Hook. Municipalities elsewhere are also waking up to the benefits of local climate improvement for their citizens and the planet.

Climate Action Plan for Town of Red Hook to be developed by Pace Law School’s Energy and Climate Center

Municipalities elsewhere also waking up to the benefits of local climate improvement for their citizens and the planet

WHITE PLAINS, NY, March 25, 2011 –Like a growing number of municipalities in New York and around the country, the small Dutchess County town of Red Hook is thinking proactively about climate change. Town officials recently signed a contract with Pace Law School’s Energy and Climate Center (PECC) to develop and implement a Climate Action Plan.

Red Hook has already taken the first step in its journey: taking stock of the carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases it emits.

Joining a proactive trend

As energy consultants, PECC staff will follow internationally recognized milestones from ICLEI, an association of over 1,200 local governments around the globe that promotes sustainable development. The PECC consultants will set a greenhouse gas reduction target for Red Hook, and develop an action plan to achieve that goal.

In seeking to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, Red Hook joins the ranks of other local communities that are taking action. Last year, 14 municipalities in Northern Westchester County formed the Northern Westchester Energy Action Consortium. Its goals: reduce reliance on fossil fuels, save money for residents and businesses, increase energy efficiency, enable renewable energy generation and increase economic activity.

Seven of those communities were awarded grants from the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) to develop climate action plans.

“The real action is local”

The plan will address the residential, commercial and transportation sectors of the Red Hook community, among others, and include a timeline, description of financing mechanisms, and assignment of responsibility to departments and staff. Community input and involvement will be sought throughout the process.

James Van Nostrand, PECC executive director, said, “We have been very involved at the state and regional levels in addressing climate change issues, but the real action is at the local level to implement the strategies necessary to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Through this work, we will effectively carry out the policies we have been promoting to help local governments and their constituents reduce their energy bills and follow more sustainable practices.”

“We are pleased to have the opportunity to work with the Town of Red Hook on this project,” he added.

The $52,000, one-year contract is funded by a grant from NYSERDA. Anne Marie Hirschberger, Climate Change Law and Policy Advisor at PECC and a graduate of Pace Law School’s J.D. and Climate Change LLM programs, will serve as project manager. She will collaborate with PECC staff and interns.

Hirschberger said, “Addressing climate change at the local level is a critical element in achieving meaningful greenhouse gas reductions, and the Town of Red Hook has already demonstrated its leadership in this area. I look forward to working with the Town over the coming year to build upon its current programs.”

Sue Crane, Town Supervisor of Red Hook, said, “The Town of Red Hook is delighted to be associated with the impressive resources of the Pace Energy and Climate Center through this NYSERDA funded program. For years the Town Board and our volunteer Conservation Advisory Council leadership have pursued efforts to raise awareness, provide education and demonstrate our commitment to sustainable programs and projects. With Anne Marie Hirschberger’s experienced management skills, together with the expertise of PECC consultants, we look forward to joining in creative, practical, replicable climate change programs that will help residents reduce their energy usage.”

Contact:

Lauren Rubenstein
Manager, Media Relations
(914) 422-4389
cell (914) 329-8680
lrubenstein@law.pace.edu

Anne Marie Hirschberger
Ottinger Energy Research Fellow
Pace Energy and Climate Center
(914) 422-4126
ahirschberger@law.pace.edu

Founded in 1976, Pace University School of Law has over 7,000 alumni throughout the country and the world and is consistently ranked among the nation’s top four programs in environmental law. It offers full- and part-time JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus and offers the Master of Laws degree in Environmental Law and Comparative Legal Studies, and a Doctor of Laws in environmental law. The School of Law is part of Pace University, a comprehensive, independent, and diversified university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu http://www.pace.edu/environment/

Summer on the River with Faculty Members and Students from Institutions Throughout the Region

media are invited to spend a day on the Hudson River with, or to interview, faculty members and students in the sixth year of a unique summer floating seminar that travels the river by ship, creating college curriculum units.

Contacts:

Chris Cory, Pace University, 212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

Alyssa Vine, Barnard College, 212-854-7907, avine@barnard.edu

Media invitation:

Summer rolling on the Hudson by 55-member college consortium produces curriculum modules ranging from environment to art

Media welcome aboard next week

Next week (July 19-23), media are invited to spend a day on the Hudson River with, or to interview, faculty members and students participating in River Summer, a program in the sixth year as a unique summer floating seminar that travels the river by ship, creating college curriculum units.

A fetching photo of participants on deck in life jackets, catching up on their common reading with the Hudson in the background, is at http://www.riversummer.org/photos/module2_2010.html

Next week’s sessions start in Poughkeepsie, but participants are available by phone. River Summer is a program of the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges & Universities, a consortium of 55 colleges and universities in the Hudson watershed. So far nearly 300 students and faculty members have participated in the program since its inaugural launch in 2005, and participants have created interdisciplinary modules that are posted at http://www.riversummer.org/curricula/field.html. The modules cover subjects ranging from marsh ecology to the Hudson River painters and urban development. Insights also go into participants’ research and teaching.

Next week’s onboard topics range from managing fisheries to the St. Lawrence Cement Company.

The formation of the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges & Universities was spearheaded by Pace University and is now headquartered at the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies. Major grant funding for River Summer has been obtained principally by Barnard College of Columbia University from the Andrew Mellon Foundation and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. River Summer is coordinated by Tim Kenna and Margie Turrin of Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory.

Please call either of us to make arrangements. See www.riversummer.org and details below.

Schedule for next week:

The focus is on options for the future of the river and its communities.

Embark: Poughkeepsie, Waryas Park

Disembark: Poughkeepsie, Waryas Park

Monday 7/19/10 –Poughkeepsie to Kingston

1000 Module 2 participants Arrive

1100- 1430 – Kathy Hattala, DEC Fisheries Unit – Managing our fishing resources, Brian Jensen, College of St. Rose

Title of curriculum: Fisheries – trawling, seining

1500 – 1700 Stuart Findlay, Cary Institute for Ecosystem Studies

Title of curriculum: The changing role of the marshes in the Hudson River – and

Sea Level Rise

1700 Transit to Kingston

View marshes along the river

Evening – Discussion Layout

Journaling – group

————————————————————————————-

Tuesday 7/20/10 Kingston

0900-1700 – Steve Schimmrich – SUNY Ulster

Title of curriculum: The Geologic resources of the Upper Hudson – Shale,

Titanium, Cement etc. & the role in the Hudson Valley long term

————————————————————————————-

Wednesday 7/21/10 Kingston

0900-1700 – Jennifer Schwartz Berky, Bard College

Title of curriculum: Kingston tales of resistance and resilience & Climate Action

Plan

————————————————————————————-

Thursday 7/22/10 – Kingston to Catskills

0700 Transit to Catskill

0900-1300 Ted Eismeier, Hamilton College –

Drop Hudson City Boat Launch at the foot of Water Street

Title of curriculum: The story of St. Lawrence Cement Controversy –

Hudson NY

1300-1700 – Ann LePore, Ramapo College

Title of curriculum: – 3-D Data Modeling – using art to convey your message

————————————————————————————-

Friday 7/23/010 Transit Catskill to Poughkeepsie

0900 – 1500 Module 3 participants final wrap up of project

1500 Students depart

Hudson-based curricular components completed or nearing completion

• Brian Jensen – Fisheries Biology

• Carol Rietsma – Marsh Ecology

• Steve Schimmrich – Geology of the Lower Hudson Valley

• Dan Farkas – Introduction to Using GIS Mapping

• Marilyn Powers – New Urbanism, the Political Economy of the Hudson River Valley and a Walking Tour Case Study

• Elizabeth Hutchinson – The Hudson River School of Art

• Michelle Land/Lee Paddock/Alex Dunn – An Environmental History of Law in The Hudson Valley

In progress: (Many preliminary presentations and lectures are posted)

• Tim Kenna – Visualizing estuarine circulation

• Ted Eismeier – Political Economy of the HV

• Margie Turrin/Karl Kehde – Community Planning/Brownfield Redevelopment in the HV

• Susan Fox Rogers – Free Writing

• Roger Panetta – Panoramas

• Howard Horowitz – Land Use in the Hudson Highlands

• Lucy Johnson – Early Man Decision Making Grid linked to a field guide of the historic uses of Denning’s Point

• Geoff Brackett – The Hudson River as a Literary Source

• Bruce Selleck – Using GPS and GIS for data collection and display

New play aims at scarcity of Native Americans in Hudson celebrations

To highlight the neglected Native American “view from the shore,” Pace University has commissioned a dramatization of the early encounters that conveys feelings on both sides.

PREMIERE THIS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17. MEDIA WELCOME. At the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in New York, 1 Bowling Green. Reception, 5:30-7:00 p.m., performance 7:00-8:00 p.m.

Media should RSVP to Samuella Becker, 212-346-1637, cell 917-734-5172, sbecker2@pace.edu

MEDIA ALSO WELCOME AT PUBLIC PERFORMANCES LISTED BELOW. Please RSVP to the media contact at the relevant campus.

New play aims at scarcity of Native Americans in “Eurocentric” Hudson quadricentennial celebrations

Portrays fatal culture clashes, stresses of first contact

Pace University commissions work by Native American writer Joseph Bruchac

Invitational Premiere Sept 17 at Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, public performances Sept. 24-27 in Troy, New York City, Poughkeepsie

NEW YORK, NY, September 14, 2009 – “It is shocking to see how dreadfully little in this year’s celebrations even acknowledges the populations who watched the mutilated native drown in the Hudson’s tides.”

So says Geoffrey L. Brackett, the Provost of Pace University, speaking about this fall’s continuing quadricentennial celebrations of Henry Hudson’s voyage up the river that now bears his name.

The mutilated brave, his hand cut off by Hudson’s crew, was a member of the Native American tribes who greeted the explorers and traded with Hudson. Then came misunderstandings, mistrust, and fatal exchanges of arrows and gunfire.

To highlight the neglected Native American “view from the shore,” Pace University has commissioned a dramatization of the early encounters that conveys feelings on both sides.

“River of Tides” is written by the prolific Native American novelist, storyteller and poet Joseph Bruchac (Abenaki), who based it on events in the journal of Hudson’s first mate, Robert Juet.

An invitation-only premiere (media welcome) is being presented by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in New York, the George Gustav Heye Center, this Thursday evening, September 17. Reception 6:30-7, performance 7:00-8:00 p.m.

Three free performances will then be presented at locations along the route of Hudson’s journey: Thursday morning, September 24, at the Sage College campus in Troy, NY (in collaboration with Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute), Saturday evening, September 26, at Pace University’s downtown Manhattan campus, and Sunday afternoon, September 27, at Marist College in Poughkeepsie.

A “talkback” session with the director and actors will take place after each performance to air some of the perennial questions the play raises about encounters between strangers.

The diverse troupe of actors, including several Native Americans, is being directed by Ruis Woertendyke, an off-Broadway director who heads Pace’s department of performing arts.

Further information on locations and times is available from the institutions.

Pace and the museum will present a shorter version of the play to children in New York City public and private schools at the museum from October 6 through 9.

Obliterated from consciousness

“The Native voice is an essential part of our shared history,” says John Haworth (Cherokee), director of the National Museum of the American Indian in New York (NMAI). “We are delighted to be working with our friends Joe Bruchac and Pace University on this important project.”

The scarcity of native material in the NY400, Hudson 400 and Exploreny400 celebrations reflects a larger issue, namely the “obliteration from our societal consciousness” of the millions of peoples and dozens of tribes who occupied the Hudson Valley when the Half Moon arrived, according to Brackett, the Pace provost.

“We hope this work will help balance the Eurocentric emphasis of much of the celebration of Henry Hudson’s enormously important exploration,” he says.

The work’s characters portray culture shock afflicting natives and a fearful and patronizing crew, escalating into the deaths of one Englishman and 21 natives.

By the end, as Woertendyke puts it, “the ‘civilized’ are savages and the ‘savages’ are civilized.”

Children’s version

The version of the play for elementary-school children, and a teacher’s guide, are being developed by the NMAI and the Pace University School of Education. To register for school performances, educators should contact Ada Torres at the museum at 212-514-3705.

Performance Schedule (all performances are free and followed by a talkback session with the director and cast)

Thursday, September 24, Troy, NY, 10:30 AM, Bush Memorial Hall, Russell Sage College, 45 Ferry St. This performance precedes a public symposium on “The Upper Hudson River Valley: Then and Now” with RPI and Sage Colleges professors.

Saturday, September 26, New York, NY, 5 pm, Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, Pace University downtown Manhattan campus, 3 Spruce Street (East of Park Row, near the corner of Gold Street). Reservations suggested at www.SmartTix.com or 212-868-4444.

Sunday, September 27, Poughkeepsie, NY, 2 pm, Marist College Nelly Goletti Theatre, Student Center. Contact Hudson River Valley Institute, 845-575-3052, Andrew.villani@marist.edu

Tuesday-Friday, October 6-9, New York, NY, adaptation for elementary schools, National Museum of the American Indian in New York. To register for school performances educators should contact Ada Torres at 212-514-3705.

Cast

The diverse cast includes several Native American actors, including the actor and storyteller Joe Cross, from the Caddo tribe of Oklahoma, a veteran of network television and off-Broadway and regional theater. The British television and stage actor Jonathan Le Billon will create the role of Hudson’s first mate and journal-keeper Juet. Several cast members are working graduates of the Pace acting program.

Musical accompaniment for the performance will come from The Spirit of the Mountain Drummers and Singers, from the Ramapo Nation.

Playwright

Joseph Bruchac is a nationally acclaimed Native American novelist, playwright, storyteller and poet of Abenaki descent. His “Dawn Land” historical novels have been described as “the first attempt to reconstruct in fiction the daily life of the indigenous tribes of America prior to the coming of the Europeans.”

He is known for books about such Native American figures as Crazy Horse, Jim Thorpe, Squanto, and the Navajo Marines of World War II, and for his edited collections of Indian myths and legends. His poems, articles and stories have appeared in over 500 publications, from the National Geographic, Parabola and Smithsonian Magazine to the American Poetry Review, Cricket and Aboriginal Voices. He has written more than 70 books for adults and children, including “Keepers of the Earth” (co-authored with Michael Caduto), “Tell Me a Tale,” “When the Chenoo Howls” (co-authored with his son, James), his autobiography, “Bowman’s Store.” His highly praised anthologies of contemporary poetry and fiction include “Songs from this Earth on Turtle’s Back,” and “Breaking Silence,” winner of an American Book Award.

Director

From off-Broadway to campus theaters, Ruis Woertendyke has directed more than 100 plays, ranging from Euripides to Chekhov, O’Neill to Albee, and Handke to Artaud. He developed the BFA Acting program at Pace University and chairs the Performing Arts Department. His own plays have been seen at La Mama and the Samuel French One-Act Festival in NYC, in the Great Plains Theatre Conference in Omaha, Nebraska, and at the California Institute of the Arts.

Woertendyke adapted and performed Anton Chekhov’s “On the Harmfulness of Tobacco” for off-off Broadway performances in New York City and New Jersey, played Arturo Ui at the Hartman Theater in Hartford and Aaron Burr at La Mama. His voice can be heard on Sesame Street and on several children’s DVD’s. He has written more than forty articles of dramatic criticism for The Educational Theatre Journal and for The Villager and the Phoenix.

Media Contacts:

Pace University—Samuella Becker, 212-346-1637, cell 917-734-5172, sbecker2@pace.edu

National Museum of the American Indian—Ann Marie Sekeres, 212-514-3823, sekeresa@si.edu

Sage Colleges – Ardelle Hirsch, 518-244-4593, hirsca@sage.edu

RPI — Jessica Otitigbe, 518-276-6050, otitij@rpi.edu

Marist College—Tim Massey, 845-575-3174

Professors from 31 Colleges and Universities to Use River as Classroom

A literal boatload of environmentally-minded professors, including faculty members from more than half of the 44 member colleges and universities of the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities, will spend three weeks roughing it and learning from each other this summer on the Hudson River and in an Adirondack field camp. Through River Summer 2006, faculty members as well as middle and high school teachers will learn about the development of the Hudson and its watershed, while preparing curriculum units for their courses.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts:
Cara Halstead Cea or Bobbi Woller, Public Information, Pace University, 914-773-3312, bwoller@pace.edu or chalstead@pace.edu
Michelle Land, Program Coordinator, Pace Academy for the Environment
914-773-3738, mland@pace.edu

Note: Media will have access to the R/V Seawolf at various points on the Hudson River between July 6 and July 29. Media are also invited to meet faculty as they teach on land along the way. A schedule is available. A list of member institutions is at the end of this release and contact information for representatives is available upon request.

BY BOAT AND ON FOOT, PROFESSORS FROM 31 COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES TO USE HUDSON RIVER AS CLASSROOM AND LAB

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, June 29, 2006 — A literal boatload of environmentally-minded professors, including faculty members from more than half of the 44 member colleges and universities of the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities, will spend three weeks roughing it and learning from each other this summer on the Hudson River and in an Adirondack field camp. Through River Summer 2006, faculty members as well as middle and high school teachers will learn about the development of the Hudson and its watershed, while preparing curriculum units for their courses.

This year’s program will run from Thursday, July 6 through Saturday, July 29. On the 6th, the participants will arrive at 5:00pm at the 79th Street Boat Basin in Manhattan to board the R/V Seawolf, a research vessel operated by the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

The program. River Summer was pilot tested last year. In this year’s expanded program, participants will undertake a multitude of studies, focusing on the interconnectedness of many disciplines. Projects include water sampling, sediment coring, archaeology, biodiversity, wastewater, policies and laws surrounding the river, geology, history, and culture. New elements of the program include:
• At the end of River Summer 2006, for the first time faculty members will have multiple, ready-made curriculum components that can be integrated into regular coursework.
• Program coordinators are now collaborating with middle and high school educators who will be on the boat, including a seventh grade teacher from a “sister watershed” (the Delaware Watershed in PA). Other participating schools include Pearl River High School, Pearl River, NY, Radnor Middle School, Wayne, PA, and the Calhoun School in Manhattan.
• Representatives from the Liberty Science Center in Jersey City, NJ, who are developing new educational programs with a focus on rivers and estuaries, will be participating.
• New working relationships have been established with urban planning groups such as those of Newburgh and Beacon, NY. The City Planner for Newburgh and a representative working on the Sustainable Master Plan for Beacon will meet with the group.
• Undergraduate students will be involved in two components, geology and archaeology, with students teaching the latter. The geology students are from SUNY Ulster County Community College and archaeology/forensic chemistry student participants are from various community colleges – some from out of state. More information about this component of the program can be found at:http://hhmivc.vassar.edu/HHMI/out_er_info.htm#er%20program%20description
• Activities will be archived this year through filming and pod-casts to make them available to a wider community, including for use in classrooms.
• Educators near rivers nationwide have now expressed an interest in learning more about the River Summer program including those in Alabama, Texas, Arizona, California, Maine, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Minnesota, and the Delaware/Maryland/D.C. area (sister watersheds).

Multi-campus coalition, growing financial support. Formed over the last two years under the leadership of the Pace Academy for the Environment (PAE), the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities (ECHVCU) consists of 44 institutions throughout the Hudson watershed that have gathered for teaching, research and educational projects they could not do separately. Its members are pledged to a new era of cooperation through contribution of the skills and talents of faculty from diverse disciplines and institutions across the region.

Pace University is secretariat for the Environmental Consortium with its office situated in the PAE. John Cronin, who was the nation’s first Riverkeeper on the Hudson and is a Scholar in Residence at Pace University, directs PAE. Michelle Land, Program Coordinator of PAE, was appointed director of the Environmental Consortium in 2004. The PAE works closely with Stephanie Pfirman, Barnard College, who envisioned River Summer, as well as Tim Kenna and Margie Turrin, Columbia’s Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, who direct and coordinate River Summer.

This year, the Mellon Foundation has pledged its support for River Summer with a $200,000 two-year grant, and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation awarded the Consortium $30,000. Additional support for the program is provided by The Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries.

The mission of River Summer 2006 is to explore innovative methods of teaching and learning, using hands-on approaches from the perspective of multiple disciplines. “Through participation in this program, we will create an inter-institutional and interdisciplinary cadre of faculty with knowledge of the Hudson and each other,” said Pfirman.

The faculty members will progress through modules covering the New York Harbor, Lower, Mid, and Upper Hudson and the Adirondacks. Other program topics include studying Riverscope instrumentation for near-real time data collection, the new political economy of the Hudson River valley, GPS and orienteering exercises, acoustic surveying in New York Harbor, and writing about the Hudson.

Unique role of higher education. “Institutions of higher education are uniquely suited to help solve environmental issues and have an obligation to do so,” said Cronin. “Universities occupy a distinct place in society, advancing the understanding of the human and natural world through investigation and teaching across all disciplines, and encouraging discourse, debate and critical thinking to serve the public good. This program has the potential to take environmental education to a new level, not just in the Hudson watershed, but by developing curriculum ideas that can be used everywhere.”

Consortium Membership. (www.environmentalconsortium.org) The current members are Bard College, Barnard College, Colgate University, Columbia University, CUNY Queens College, Dominican College, Fordham University, Hamilton College, Iona College, Manhattan College, Manhattanville College, Marist College, Marymount College of Fordham University, Marymount Manhattan College, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, Mercy College, Mount Saint Mary College, College of Mount Saint Vincent, The College of New Rochelle, Pace University, Polytechnic University, Ramapo College of New Jersey, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, The Sage Colleges, The College of Saint Rose, Saint Thomas Aquinas College, Sarah Lawrence College, Siena College, Skidmore College, SUNY University at Albany, SUNY Columbia-Greene Community College, SUNY Dutchess Community College, SUNY Maritime College, SUNY New Paltz, SUNY, North Country Community College, SUNY Orange County Community College, SUNY Purchase College, SUNY Rockland Community College, SUNY Schenectady County Community College, SUNY Stony Brook, SUNY Ulster County Community College, SUNY Westchester Community College, Union College, Vassar College.

Founded in 1906, Pace University educates achievers who are engaged with critical issues both locally and globally. Known for its outcome-oriented environment that prepares students to succeed in a wide-range of professions, Pace has three campuses, including New York City (downtown and lower Manhattan), Westchester (Pleasantville, Briarcliff, and the White Plains Graduate Center), and the Pace School of Law in White Plains. A private metropolitan university, Pace enrolls more than 14,000 students in undergraduate, masters, and doctoral programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Ivan G. Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, and School of Education. Visit Pace University at www.pace.edu.

New Coalition to Announce Coordinated Agenda for Environmental Education and Public Service

College students will soon have the opportunity to take “classes” by kayak when an innovative “River Summer Semester” launches on the Hudson River.

Contact
Christopher T. Cory, Director of Public Information, Pace University
212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu
Michele Land, Pace Academy for the Environment
914-773-3738 or mland@pace.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY
Editors: Sessions are closed to the public, open to reporters/producers.

Consortium leaders will issue a statement at 2:00 PM Saturday, October 30.
The statement can be emailed in midafternoon that day to interested desks and reporters. Please let us know if you want it.
It also will be posted on the coalition’s website, www.EnvironmentalConsortium.org.

Trading classrooms for kayaks?
NEW COALITION OF 33 HUDSON VALLEY COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES
TO ANNOUNCE COORDINATED AGENDA
FOR ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC SERVICE

Collaborative event will be “most important environmental/academic conference
ever held in the region” and set national model

Pleasantville, NY, October 26, 2004 – College students will soon have the opportunity to take “classes” by kayak when an innovative “River Summer Semester” launches on the Hudson River.

A group of colleges and universities that are collaborating to incubate the project will refine the curriculum in a conference Friday and Saturday, October 29-30, in Poughkeepsie at Marist College.

The group is the new Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities. Formed in February, it now includes 33 of the valley’s 60 colleges and universities. Their representatives will be planning new ways to improve the environment through cooperative teaching, research and service.

Consortium members include institutions close to the Hudson’s headwaters like Rensselaer Polytechnic in Troy, those near where the river mixes with sea water like Columbia, eight units of the State University of New York, small private colleges like Vassar and religious schools like Fordham.

Undergraduate research. The meeting will be the “most important environmental/academic conference ever held in the region,” said John Cronin, who directs Pace University’s Academy for the Environment and was the nation’s first Riverkeeper. In the last two years the Pace Academy has lead the creation of the new coalition and continues to play the key organizational role, under the direction of Michelle Land, a graduate of Pace Law School.

Presentations and “posters” by participants will provide an overview of undergraduate environmental programs already in place throughout the Valley. National and statewide perspective will come from experts at Oklahoma State University, Williams College, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

Field stations and mentors. The “River Summer Semester” being crafted will be an interdisciplinary, intercampus combination of field work, class work, and work in communities. As students make their way down the Hudson from its headwaters in the Adirondacks to Manhattan, they will travel by foot, train and kayak, changing locations each week.

Other planned multi-campus courses and research projects will use the Hudson Valley as “an extended laboratory and classroom,” Cronin says. By joining resources, schools can accomplish more than any single institution. For example, the Consortium envisions a shared research vessel and field stations. Students will learn by sharing professors from other institutions than their own .

Pataki connection. Already Pace, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Columbia and the New York State Rivers and Estuaries Center on the Hudson are partners on “Riverscope,” a $1 million continuous, real-time monitoring system for the Hudson. A coalition website, www.environmentalconsortium.org , is helping professors and administrators exchange ideas.

Speakers at the consortium’s founding conference in February included Governor George E. Pataki, who announced the formation of an independent but related Higher Education Advisory Council on the Hudson headed by Pace President David A. Caputo. The group pledged cooperation with the new Rivers and Estuaries Center, for which Cronin wears a second hat as Managing Director.

Campuses are the ideal candidates. “Higher education must become more engaged in the environment,” Cronin insists.

“Colleges and universities are the only institutions with the dual purposes of being multi-disciplinary and serving society. They have the critical and intellectual capacity to marshal the knowledge and skills that environmental issues and environmental education require.”

The group hopes to set a model for other regions. “We believe the outcomes will have wide-ranging effects on environmental agendas for many college and universities,” Cronin says.

He adds: “The Hudson River Valley is an environmental bellwether. Environmental activities here predated Earth Day in 1970, and the Hudson has been the locus of pioneering case law and urban and rural environmental victories. Pace and other regional institutions are in the midst of an environmental culture of national and global significance.”

Membership. The current members of the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges & Universities are Bard College; Barnard College; Columbia University; CUNY – Queens College; Dominican College; Fordham University; Iona College; Manhattan College; Manhattanville College; Marist College; Marymount College of Fordham University; Mount Saint Mary College; the College of Mount Saint Vincent; The College of New Rochelle; Pace University; Polytechnic University; Ramapo College of New Jersey; Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; The Sage Colleges; The College of Saint Rose; Saint Thomas Aquinas College; Sarah Lawrence College; Sienna College; the State University of New York campuses at New Paltz, Purchase, Stony Brook and Albany; the SUNY community colleges of Westchester, Columbia-Greene, Rockland, and Ulster County; Union College and Vassar College.

The Pace Academy’s mission deepens a commitment to environmental studies that the university has made since the 1980s. The School of Law’s environmental law program, for instance, including the Environmental Litigation Clinic, founded by Cronin and now co-directed by Robert F. Kennedy Jr. is ranked third-best in the nation by U.S. News & World Report.

As a private metropolitan university, Pace has a growing national reputation for offering students opportunity, teaching and learning based on research, civic involvement and measurable outcomes. It is one of the ten founders of Project Pericles, developing education that encourages lifelong participation in democratic processes. Pace has seven campuses, including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. Approximately 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu.

Higher Education Takes on the Environment

February 26, 2004 – Twenty-five colleges, including Marymount College of Fordham University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Columbia University, Vassar College, Bard College, Sarah Lawrence College and Pace University, will announce the official formation of Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges & Universities. The consortium is dedicated to improving the environment of the Hudson River Valley and will hold its first conference, February 27-28, Friday and Saturday in Tarrytown. The consortium was created in conjunction with Pace University’s Academy for the Environment, headed by the first Hudson Riverkeeper, John Cronin.

Contact:
Mary Horgan, Pace University, 914-923-2798, cell: 914-424-3845, mhorgan@pace.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY

HIGHER EDUCATION TAKES ON THE ENVIRONMENT

CHALLENGES OF THE HUDSON RIVER VALLEY TO BE EXPLORED AT CONFERENCE ON FUTURE

WHEN: February 27-28, Friday and Saturday

WHERE: Dolce Tarrytown House, East Sunnyside Lane, Tarrytown, NY

WHO:
Governor George E. Pataki
Congresswoman Nita Lowey
Dr. A. Karim Ahmed, Director, International Programs, Secretary- Treasurer of National Council for Science and the Environment
John Cronin, Director of the Pace Academy for the Environment

PLEASANTVILLE, NY — February 26, 2004 – Twenty-five colleges, including Marymount College of Fordham University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Columbia University, Vassar College, Bard College, Sarah Lawrence College and Pace University, will announce the official formation of Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges & Universities. The consortium is dedicated to improving the environment of the Hudson River Valley and will hold its first conference, February 27-28, Friday and Saturday in Tarrytown. The consortium was created in conjunction with Pace University’s Academy for the Environment, headed by the first Hudson Riverkeeper, John Cronin.

Council of Higher Education Leaders. Governor Pataki plans to announce the creation of a Council of Higher Education Leaders to help guide the Governor’s Rivers and Estuaries Center in best serving the needs of colleges and universities while fostering enlightened environmental policy.

The Center which will break ground in Beacon, NY this spring, was housed at Pace during its planning and development stages. David A. Caputo, President of Pace, has agreed to chair the new council.

“Higher education must become more engaged in the environment,” says Cronin. “Colleges and universities are the only institutions with the dual purposes of being multi-disciplinary and serving society, so they are the ideal candidates to marshal the knowledge and skills to deal with the complex issues of dealing with the environment. This coalition, and the interest in the Hudson by our political leaders, is an extremely encouraging sign.”

Media are welcome to attend the conference. Please register with Michelle Land at 914-473-0950.

Pace Scholar to Appear on PBS Documentary

John Cronin, Pace Resident Scholar in Environmental Studies, former Hudson
Riverkeeper, co-author of The Riverkeepers, documentary filmmaker, advocate for the Hudson and former commercial fisherman to be featured in PBS documentary on the Hudson River.

Who: John Cronin, Pace Resident Scholar in Environmental Studies, former Hudson
Riverkeeper, co-author of The Riverkeepers, documentary filmmaker, advocate for the Hudson and former commercial fisherman to be featured in PBS documentary on the Hudson River.

What: AMERICA’S FIRST RIVER: BILL MOYERS ON THE HUDSON

When: April 23 and April 24 from 9:00 to 11:00 p.m. (ET) on PBS (check local listings)

To reach John Cronin for expert comment on the making of the documentary and to learn more about the Hudson River contact: Mary Horgan at (914) 923-2798, email: mhorgan@pace.edu.
or Donald Singletary at (212) 346-1637, email: dsingletary@pace.edu.

John Cronin Biographical Information

Since 2000 Cronin has been the Resident Scholar in Environmental Studies at Pace University. He founded the Pace Institute for Environmental and Regional Studies to focus the talents and expertise of the university community on the environmental challenges facing the Hudson River and neighboring residents. Cronin also serves on the founding staff of Governor George Pataki’s Rivers and Estuaries Center on the Hudson, a global institute for environmental research and education. In addition, he is the president of the Hudson Fisheries Trust, established to preserve the maritime history and lore of the Hudson River’s commercial fishing families.

John Cronin has earned a reputation as one of America’s preeminent environmentalists. The Knight-Ridder Newspapers praised him as a “hero in one of the great success stories of the modern environmental movement,” People magazine described him as “equal parts detective, scientist and public advocate,” and the Wall Street Journal has called him “a unique presence on America’s major waterways.”

Named a Hero for the Planet by TIME magazine in 1999 for his work as America’s, and the Hudson’s, first full-time Riverkeeper, he was responsible for bringing to justice more than one hundred polluters and environmental lawbreakers. He co-founded the Water Keeper Alliance, which now represents more than 90 “Keeper” programs on waterways in four countries.
Cronin is an author, an award-winning documentary filmmaker and former commercial fishermen. He has been the subject of two books and numerous documentaries and profiles, co-authored the book The Riverkeepers, with Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., and has been a frequent contributor on environmental policy to The New York Times. Along with “Gorillas in the Mist” producer Robert Nixon he produced and wrote “The Last Rivermen” which the Motion Picture Academy Foundation named one of the outstanding documentary films of 1991.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.